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Thread: CORZINE TAXES!!!!!!!

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovenj
    Mr Corzine should be commended for the great work he is doing for NJ. He has stabalized our economy and brought our property tax down by 20%. Their should be a statue of Mr Corzine in every School in NJ to show students who saved NJ. Mr Jon Corzine
    ilovenj, You are being sarcastict right ? Please pay attention to the news. Corzine has not brought down our taxes 20%. No property tax relief bill has been signed into law at this time and the unions, town mayors, and others will not let any relief come at the expense of their benefits or losing power. When we are paying twice the national average for property taxes, 20% will not make any difference. We will only get a $800.00 tax credit. We on average pay $6,000 per year. My Uncle pays $12,000 a year (for WHAT)? Is 20% going to help? If that 20% goes into effect, taxes will have already gone up to a point where that 20% will only get us down to where we are now. Corzines most recent approval rating was 42%. People in this state are starting to question if any relief will ever come. If the economy was so great in N.J. why is our unemployment rate higher than the national average when before he took office it was lower? Why did he raise the sales tax 16%? Why are people moving out of N.J. at an alarming rate? In my opinion he may already be close to losing the next election if he runs. I for one will not vote for the Democrats in Nov.! Under their so-called leadership the state is sinking deeper and deeper into a hole and they do not care! They dont want a comptroller to have to much power because then he could tell us where our tax money is going. Is that fair to us? If you look at the front page of the Star-Ledger this past Thursday a headline is " Legislators slice another reform from pension bill". The Democrats are not helping this state at all. No reform is taking place under these people. The unions in this state are only looking out for themselves and as I said will NOT give up anything for the state. Corzine is all talk and is proving it every week he is in office. It is becoming a bigger joke every day. And the only reason Farber left was because of public pressure, Corzine admitted he did not ask her to leave. As far as a statue of Corzine at schools, those statues would end up being brought down like Saddams statue in Bagdad! Have a good day and a pleasant tomorrow!
    Last edited by NJPRIDE; 01-27-2007 at 11:29 AM.
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  2. #102
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    Question Corzine taxes

    Hi NJPride, I read on South Jersey.com that Corzine was lowering the property taxes 20%. Is that something that did not go through or Corzine didn't follow through? I would like to know if it is true or not. Marianita

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianita
    Hi NJPride, I read on South Jersey.com that Corzine was lowering the property taxes 20%. Is that something that did not go through or Corzine didn't follow through? I would like to know if it is true or not. Marianita
    Not true yet. ( I think he has stated that he wants to lower property taxes by 20%)

    If it becomes reality, it will be interesting to see if (a) Spending decreases to keep in line with reduced revenue (b) will fees/taxes increase elsewhere to overshadow the 2-% decrease in property taxes
    Sincerely,
    Anthony


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  4. #104
    New Jersey Ambassador Admin & Founder JerseyDevil's Avatar
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    Corzines Property Tax relief is a joke. Everyone can read and comment more about it on the Property Tax Relief thread. He's in bed with the unions, so nothing is going to happen. Every special interest has their hand in the NJ Benefits Cookie Jar and no one is going to budge. Unions don't want to give up their inflated pensions, the politicians don't want to give up their multiple office holdings, the municipalities don't want to merge, etc. New Jersey will have property tax relief win pigs fly!

    BTW - I have to agree with NJPride. Either ILoveNJ is being sarcastic or I would have to say that he must be a Corzine helper who goes on messageboards to try to defend Corzine's actions. It's not unusual. Corporations do it all the time.
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  5. #105
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    Question Corzine taxes

    Hi Mithrandir, Thankyou for clearing this matter up. Now I remember reading that Corzine wanted to cut property taxes by 20%. I had asked my son if he felt that would be a significant amount as it seemed to me very little in the grand scheme of things. Tell me if I am right or wrong but property is expensive in New Jersey. Isnt 20% very little to be of much help to a home owner? And do you think that Corzine will tax something else to make up for the 20% reduction in property taxes? With a huge deficit as it is it may amount to just moving money around with nothing gained. What do you think? Marianita

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianita
    Hi Mithrandir, Thankyou for clearing this matter up. Now I remember reading that Corzine wanted to cut property taxes by 20%. I had asked my son if he felt that would be a significant amount as it seemed to me very little in the grand scheme of things. Tell me if I am right or wrong but property is expensive in New Jersey. Isnt 20% very little to be of much help to a home owner? And do you think that Corzine will tax something else to make up for the 20% reduction in property taxes? With a huge deficit as it is it may amount to just moving money around with nothing gained. What do you think? Marianita
    20% reduction of property taxes is a step in the right direction.

    20% of $1,000 is $200. 20% of $10,000 is $2,000.

    The problem is what will they do elsewhere in the revenue collection/gov't opperation. If they just increase "taxes/fees" to compensate for the 20% reduction, then it will not make much of a difference.

    The gov't will need to reduce spending. This means that the gov't will need to make difficult choices about how and where they spend the peoples money. As said elsewhere, the people in gov't are either unwilling or unable to reduce spending.
    Sincerely,
    Anthony


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  7. #107
    New Jerseyan ilovenj's Avatar
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    Default N.J. is great

    Im glad you agree that we in N.J. should pay taxes to support the greatest state in America. I hope Mr Corzine raises our sales tax to 8%. Im proud to pay N.J. for the great state it is. Our Politicains get multiple pensions because they do multiple jobs. Sounds fair to me.

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    Default Corzine taxes

    Hi Mithrandir,
    I see where a 20% tax cut would be fine. The problem is spending. There would not be such a huge deficit if the people's money was wisely spent. I really feel that cutting funds for universities is wrong. Infact that is where more money should be alloted. The people should have a choice as to where and how their money should be spent. It could be that the people in government just do not know anymore how to reduce spending as it has gotton out of control. Marianita

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    Question

    Well, Everyone should pay their taxes. My son said the taxes are high but it is worth it because he is happy there. But he did say the taxes are too high. Why on earth would you want Corzine to raise the sales taxes to 8%? What would be done with the tax increase? Now that would be interesting to see. Marianita

  10. #110
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    Default Mr.Corzine Rocks!!!!!

    Remember, the people of N.J. voted Mr. Corzine as our Governor. We must have faith in our decision. We pay more then twice the national average because is N.J. is twice as better then any state. I support Mr. Corzine and his ethics. We have the best unions in N.J. and if they think we should pay more taxes to support them, then I don't see the problem. We have the hardest working Government in the nation and all they get is 2 measly part time pensions and people complain about paying a little tax. If you love N.J., then be proud to pay your property tax.

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    Default Corzine taxes

    Hi ilovenj, I never thought of it quite that way. I would say I am proud to do whatever the law says we must do. Jesus paid taxes too. But you are talking to someone who pays alot of taxes as I have properties. I also work full part and have a part time job. When I get moved to NJ to live I will pay my taxes there also as I always obey the law. The IRS loves people like me. lol. But I know of no one who loves to pay taxes. There is not much choice in the matter. And I do love NJ. But when it gets right down to it, although I pay taxes and will in NJ I would rather have the money for Cherry Hill Mall. That is one reason I work so much. Marianita

  12. #112
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    Default Thank you Marianita

    Thank you Marianita for 100% agreeing with me. If you choose, I said choose to live in N.J., the then you should support the state with paying your share of taxes. I feel pride when I pay my sales tax. The state taxed my health club and I pay it with pride. I am proud of N.J. and its legislature. I look forward in future taxes. I know when I pay, I support N.J. If Corzine does not give tax relief, at least I have the satisfaction knowing that money helps the state.

  13. #113
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    You know - ILoveNJ - You can pay more in taxes if YOU wish. I'm sure since you think that paying high taxes are so great and a sign of love for the state you would have no problem giving the inept state government more of YOUR money. Most people in the legislature are tied to special interest groups and it is a fact that NJ has one of the most corrupt governments in the country. high taxes are not a sign of loving the state. As for the unions - all they are is a large corporation. I would rather support a store or business that are NON-union than those money grubbers who would rather bankrupt and hold the state hostage. Unions are waste anymore - except for supporting the mafia and paying for those nice vacation homes in the Caribbean for the union bosses.

    If the legislature loved the state, if the governor loved the state - then they would be doing things that actually supported the state, instead of giving oour tax money to sports teams who carry NY on their uniforms or building billion dollar tunnels to send our jobs over to NY. They would be working to attract businesses to our great cities, like Newark and Jersey City.
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  14. #114
    New Jerseyan ilovenj's Avatar
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    Default Thank you

    Im glad you also agree with me. N.J. Rocks. Mr. Corzine Rocks. N.J. Goverment Rocks. In 1985, Mr. Kean gave us a motto " N.J. and you, perfect together" Mr. Corzine should endorse " Pay your taxes with pride" . That works for me.

  15. #115
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    Default N.J. loves Mr.Corzine

    We in N.J. don't want to lose Mr.Corzine. You want proof?
    Read :

    http://wcbstv.com/politics/local_story_341140803.html

    A Quote:

    "A Corzine spokesman said Thursday that the poll reflected the fact that New Jerseyans were pleased the job the governor was doing and didn't want him to go. "

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilovenj
    Im glad you also agree with me. N.J. Rocks. Mr. Corzine Rocks. N.J. Goverment Rocks. In 1985, Mr. Kean gave us a motto " N.J. and you, perfect together" Mr. Corzine should endorse " Pay your taxes with pride" . That works for me.
    ilovenj,
    I think you are speaking with tongue firmly in your cheek.
    ================================================== =======
    Regardless of the money that people pay to gov't, it is important that gov't spends our money wisely. We need to get the best value for each dollar that we spend.

    If people in gov't cannot spend our money wisely, then it is time to vote new people in who will do a better job of spending our money responsibly.

    I think Corzine's idea of a controller (sp?) that can audit various parts of
    gov't spending (at all levels) is a good idea.

    There needs to be accountability in how gov't spends our money.
    Sincerely,
    Anthony


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  17. #117
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    Default Corzine taxes

    Hi ilovenj, I say. Since you have to pay the taxes anyway you may as will have a good attitude about it. I am willing to bet that the IRS is just as pleased as you are. '
    Now I do not as yet pay taxes in NJ but I sure help the economy with my spending when I am over there.
    Corzine just might get around to raising the sales tax again but I think we are safe for awhile. I also agree with Mithrandir that government spending can be controlled with audits. As you must be well aware, New Jersey has an enormous deficit from spending.It boggles the mind. I realize that the deficit was already there when Corzine took over. I do not know if McGreevy made any headway with it or not. It is funny that there is not much being said about it these days, almost like out of sight out of mind. Marianita

  18. #118
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    Default Great News: Mr.Corzine does it again

    Press Roundup Corzine Shows True Colors
    Great editorial from the Asbury Park Press on Jan. 29, 2007

    If you think for one minute that Governor Corzine or that bunch under the gold dome cares one bit about you and your family, you are out of your mind. They are shameless and soulless.

    The latest example: Corzine's new list of board and commission appointments. It is chock full of hacks and people with a vested interest in perpetuating the status quo: government that serves elected officials, developers, labor unions, and others who feed at the public trough -- at the expense of taxpayers and good public policy.

    In a startling display of contempt for taxpayers, the appointments list includes nominations that would fill two county tax boards -- prized patronage plums -- beyond levels that would be imposed under proposed legislation. Lawmakers are trying to downsize county tax boards after they unnecessarily expanded them -- solely for political reasons -- two years ago. Corzine knows that. He obviously doesn't care.

    One of the four tax board appointees, Philip Thigpen, is chairman of the Essex County Democratic Committee. Another, Kevin P. Egan, is the brother of Middlesex County Assemblyman Joseph Egan. Business as usual.

    Other appointments on the list further cement Corzine's reputation for being joined at the hip with unions and developers:

    Raymond Pocino, arguably the most powerful union president in New Jersey in his role as vice president and eastern region manager of the Laborers' Union, was appointed to the New Jersey Turnpike Authority. That poses an automatic conflict of interest.

    Edithe Fulton of Toms River, past president of the New Jersey Education Association, was appointed to the state Board of Education -- the first former NJEA president to be named in recent memory.

    Red Bank attorney Ed McKenna, a protege of recently jailed Democratic power broker John Lynch, was appointed to the state Planning Commission.

    We had hoped Corzine would be different. We had hoped he would keep at bay the special interests that have helped make New Jersey unaffordable and have blocked reform. We hoped his poor judgment in installing Zulima Farber as attorney general was an aberration. These latest sorry appointments prove it was nothing of the kind. Corzine is one of them.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    How Plans for Tax Reform Were Pecked to Pieces:
    Five Moments Illustrate NJ Leaders' Inability to Aid Homeowners
    This is an in depth story from The Star-Ledger with quite a self explanatory title and subtitle. Highlights:

    It was six months ago today when Governor Jon Corzine and state leaders pledged to "get serious" about reforming the system that led to runaway property taxes.

    Corzine convened a historic legislative session, challenging lawmakers to attack the "sacred cows" that paralyzed tax relief. Legislators formed four committees, held dozens of public hearings and pounded out 98 proposals that filled more than 500 pages.

    The goal was simple: Reduce most property taxes 20 percent. Make it possible by cutting bloated pensions and benefits; consolidating some of New Jersey's 1,182 governments and school districts; capping yearly local tax increases at 4 percent; retooling the school aid formula; and establishing a state watchdog against wasteful government.

    But the proposals have taken a unusual route, even by Trenton standards.

    Instead of facing public scrutiny and debate in legislative committee hearings, they were hustled into Room L-202. Also called the Senate Majority Caucus Room, it contains a 36-foot conference table surrounded by brown leather chairs under a trio of recessed skylights. There is a sideboard where chicken and pasta from one of Trenton's top Italian restaurants are usually simmering in chafing dishes.

    In that room, 22 Democrats, under pressure in an election year, whittled, molded, and reshaped the bills for the Senate floor.

    What has emerged from that room in recent weeks is a reform package that looks vastly different from the one that went in.

    School district consolidation? Gone. A ban on pensions for part-timers? Forget it. An all-powerful comptroller? Hardly.

    Property tax reform is not dead. But even some party stalwarts say the process has all but ensured that New Jerseyans won't see the dramatic change they were promised.

    "Somewhere along the way, we lost our heart," Sen. John Adler (D-Camden), who chaired one of the four special committees, said last week. "On almost every reform effort we've deferred to special interests, and every time we've done that, we've hurt the public interest. We'll end up with higher property taxes, more homeowners leaving New Jersey, more businesses leaving the state, and a bigger crisis next year."

    There is no single point where the plan jumped the tracks. But a few key moments in the past seven weeks illustrate how and why reform has stalled.


    How Plans for Tax Reform Were Pecked to Pieces:
    Five Moments Illustrate NJ Leaders' Inability to Aid Homeowners
    This is an in depth story from The Star-Ledger with quite a self explanatory title and subtitle. Highlights:

    It was six months ago today when Governor Jon Corzine and state leaders pledged to "get serious" about reforming the system that led to runaway property taxes.

    Corzine convened a historic legislative session, challenging lawmakers to attack the "sacred cows" that paralyzed tax relief. Legislators formed four committees, held dozens of public hearings and pounded out 98 proposals that filled more than 500 pages.

    The goal was simple: Reduce most property taxes 20 percent. Make it possible by cutting bloated pensions and benefits; consolidating some of New Jersey's 1,182 governments and school districts; capping yearly local tax increases at 4 percent; retooling the school aid formula; and establishing a state watchdog against wasteful government.

    But the proposals have taken a unusual route, even by Trenton standards.

    Instead of facing public scrutiny and debate in legislative committee hearings, they were hustled into Room L-202. Also called the Senate Majority Caucus Room, it contains a 36-foot conference table surrounded by brown leather chairs under a trio of recessed skylights. There is a sideboard where chicken and pasta from one of Trenton's top Italian restaurants are usually simmering in chafing dishes.

    In that room, 22 Democrats, under pressure in an election year, whittled, molded, and reshaped the bills for the Senate floor.

    What has emerged from that room in recent weeks is a reform package that looks vastly different from the one that went in.

    School district consolidation? Gone. A ban on pensions for part-timers? Forget it. An all-powerful comptroller? Hardly.

    Property tax reform is not dead. But even some party stalwarts say the process has all but ensured that New Jerseyans won't see the dramatic change they were promised.

    "Somewhere along the way, we lost our heart," Sen. John Adler (D-Camden), who chaired one of the four special committees, said last week. "On almost every reform effort we've deferred to special interests, and every time we've done that, we've hurt the public interest. We'll end up with higher property taxes, more homeowners leaving New Jersey, more businesses leaving the state, and a bigger crisis next year."

    There is no single point where the plan jumped the tracks. But a few key moments in the past seven weeks illustrate how and why reform has stalled.

    http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index....750.xml&coll=1
    Last edited by ilovenj; 01-31-2007 at 11:16 AM.

  19. #119
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    ILoveNJ - I see that we were correct - HEAVY sarcasm on your part. So tell us how you REALLY feel about Corzine and his taxes?

    BTW - New Jersey can learn a lot from Switzerland and how low taxes can benefit our state. Not that our tax happy politicians would understand - but maybe if New Jerseyans start waking up, otherwise we will be a very poor state. This article was on BBC.com...

    Swiss low-tax policy irks EU
    By Imogen Foulkes
    BBC News, Bern


    Switzerland's decentralised taxation system is causing irritation among its European Union neighbours.

    The row was triggered by the decision, late last year, of the French rock star Johnny Hallyday to leave France and take up residence in the Swiss Alpine resort of Gstaad.

    Hallyday, who has complained publicly about the high taxes in France, will now pay tax not on his multi-million-dollar income, but on the value of the fairly modest chalet he has built himself in Gstaad.

    All he has to do in return is promise to live in the chalet for at least six months of each year.

    In France, where Hallyday is a national icon, there is anger. Advisers to the French presidential candidate Segolene Royal have accused Switzerland of "looting" its neighbours.

    Many high-earning celebrities, among them Charles Aznavour, Michael Schumacher and Tina Turner already live in Switzerland for tax reasons, and it is rumoured that the British pop star James Blunt will be the next to arrive.

    'Unfair subsidies'
    But aside from the irritation over the loss of celebrity tax income, Switzerland's neighbours have a more serious concern.

    Swiss cantons are allowed to set their own taxes and many are now engaging in an internal corporate tax-cutting competition.

    Canton Obwalden, in central Switzerland, slashed its corporate tax rate to just 6.6% at the start of 2006; it attracted 376 new companies in just 11 months.

    The European Commission has warned that this may constitute an unfair subsidy under the European Free Trade Agreement.

    "Talk to any tax expert," said Michael Reiterer, the commission's new ambassador to Switzerland.

    "This is recognised as a subsidy. And there we think Switzerland should think a bit whether behaviour which is clearly outlawed in the EU is the best policy to follow in such a close relationship between two partners."

    It is true that foreign businesses are beating a path to Switzerland's door, primarily to Zurich.

    Its overall tax rate of 21% is not the lowest in Europe, but still far lower than Switzerland's immediate neighbours Germany, France, Italy and Austria.

    Zurich 'grateful'
    Google, Kraft and IBM have all chosen Zurich as their European headquarters. Google is set to expand its Zurich office this year from around 300 staff to 1,600, making it the biggest Google office outside the United States.

    Stefan Kux, head of economic development for Zurich, is not the least bit worried by the complaints from Brussels, in fact he sees them as quite positive.

    "We are profiting from the mistakes of our neighbours," he explained. "They are making economic promotion for us for free, everyone now knows that Switzerland has an excellent tax system, so I'm very grateful."

    Switzerland is not in the European Union, nevertheless it does need good trade relations with the EU, and has spent 10 long years negotiating a set of complicated bilateral deals.

    No-one now wants a row with Brussels, but within the Swiss government there is little patience with Europe's objections over tax.

    "The Swiss position is on very safe ground," insisted Adrian Sollberger, spokesman for Switzerland's office of European policy.

    "We do not have an agreement to harmonise taxes, none whatsoever, so by definition there cannot be any infringement of any agreement between Switzerland and the EU."

    Quality of life
    Many in Switzerland suspect that the complaints are inspired by a more basic emotion than any real legal concerns; jealousy that the little country which refused to join the European Union should now be doing so well.

    Stefan Kux points out that Zurich, which regularly tops international quality of life surveys, has far more to offer than competitive tax rates.

    "We are Big Apple big city and at the same time Long Island lifestyle," he said. "It's a very small city, we have a lot of multinational companies, but in five minutes you are in the countryside.

    "You can't find that in London, or Frankfurt or Shanghai. And I think this mixture of the mountains and the business, good quality of life, I think that's the uniqueness of Switzerland."

    That point of view is supported by Randy Knaflic, head of human resources for Google in Zurich.

    "It is true that the corporate tax, and the personal tax rates, are big advantages," he admits. "Especially when you're recruiting a computer scientist who's been paying 40 or 50% tax in one of the neighbouring countries."

    "But the comparison I make is living nine years in New York City," he continued. "In New York I had a wonderful apartment, but in the morning I'd wake up and look out the window and wave to my neighbour. Here I wake up and look out and I see the Alps."

    But Brussels' quarrel is not with Switzerland's quality of life but with its tax system, and there the EU has made it clear it expects some compromise.

    So far, the Swiss government will not budge; ministers say they view an attack on the tax system as an attack on Swiss sovereignty.

    The row is sure to simmer on. Meanwhile the businesses and the celebrities just keep on coming.
    New Jersey needs to attract businesses, provide jobs locally, instead of people commuting into NY and Philadelphia.

    New Jersey is basically the France of America - high taxes and strong unions.
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  20. #120
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    Default Corzine taxes

    Hi ilovenj, Do not feel too bad because you did not know all these things. I myself have been keeping up with NJ news as well as my own plus working and all. The only way I have managed to keep up is to check the news every day. I am doing that for 2 states. lol. Take care. Marianita

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