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Thread: NJ State Senate Exodus

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    Recent Resident Impeach Corzine's Avatar
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    Default NJ State Senate Exodus

    11 State Senators have retired/resigned this year and we're still over two months away from June's primary date. There are 40 members of the Upper House in New Jersey so, the exodus thus far accounts for more than 25% of the esteemed governmental body. Surely this must be an unprecedented pre-primary defection to the public sector, right? Good luck answering that question.

    Staffers with more than 30 years experience in Trenton, current lawmakers, political science professors and journalists couldn't come up with the correct response. The legislature's librarian who is currently writing a book on New Jersey history didn't have the answer either but he had a reason; nobody has ever thought to keep records on legislators who retire or resign before a primary or general election. One thing is for sure according to these insiders; there will be more new faces in the State Senate come January than there have been at any time since the first post-Watergate election.

    Incumbent politicians have a huge advantage come Election Day, So when you have so many you sort of say, what's going on? Poor health for some members, the possibility of very tough primary battles and up and coming politicians who may be a little impatient are all factors in the large amount of retirement announcements and, In the last five years or so, New Jersey, the media, people themselves have put ethics much higher on their agenda and some legislators would fit into that category of, maybe I don't want any more of those questions being asked.

    I also think that we're seeing a new generation of young political leadership that has every right to say that they want to play a role. The downside of that is we will not have the collective wisdom and experience of people that have been there for a long time. Fresh ideas from new voices can be a positive, It's also good for New Jersey because some of the old ways of doing things are being questioned.

    8 Republican State Senators have announced they will not seek re-election. They are Bob Littell from Sussex County, Bill Gormley from Atlantic County, Martha Bark from Burlington County, Leonard Connors from Ocean County, Joe Palaia from Monmouth County, Walter Kavanaugh from Somerset County, Bob Martin from Morris County and Hank McNamara from Bergen County. If one more GOP member drops out it will mean exactly half of the Republican Senate caucus is not returning.

    3 Democratic State Senators have officially thrown in the towel. They are, Wayne Bryant from Camden County, the once-powerful Budget Committee chairman who is currently the focus of a US Attorney criminal probe, Bernie Kenny from Hudson County, the current Democratic Senate Leader and Joe Doria, also from Hudson County.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Impeach Corzine
    11 State Senators have retired/resigned this year and we're still over two months away from June's primary date. There are 40 members of the Upper House in New Jersey so, the exodus thus far accounts for more than 25% of the esteemed governmental body. Surely this must be an unprecedented pre-primary defection to the public sector, right? Good luck answering that question.

    Staffers with more than 30 years experience in Trenton, current lawmakers, political science professors and journalists couldn't come up with the correct response. The legislature's librarian who is currently writing a book on New Jersey history didn't have the answer either but he had a reason; nobody has ever thought to keep records on legislators who retire or resign before a primary or general election. One thing is for sure according to these insiders; there will be more new faces in the State Senate come January than there have been at any time since the first post-Watergate election.

    Incumbent politicians have a huge advantage come Election Day, So when you have so many you sort of say, what's going on? Poor health for some members, the possibility of very tough primary battles and up and coming politicians who may be a little impatient are all factors in the large amount of retirement announcements and, In the last five years or so, New Jersey, the media, people themselves have put ethics much higher on their agenda and some legislators would fit into that category of, maybe I don't want any more of those questions being asked.

    I also think that we're seeing a new generation of young political leadership that has every right to say that they want to play a role. The downside of that is we will not have the collective wisdom and experience of people that have been there for a long time. Fresh ideas from new voices can be a positive, It's also good for New Jersey because some of the old ways of doing things are being questioned.

    8 Republican State Senators have announced they will not seek re-election. They are Bob Littell from Sussex County, Bill Gormley from Atlantic County, Martha Bark from Burlington County, Leonard Connors from Ocean County, Joe Palaia from Monmouth County, Walter Kavanaugh from Somerset County, Bob Martin from Morris County and Hank McNamara from Bergen County. If one more GOP member drops out it will mean exactly half of the Republican Senate caucus is not returning.

    3 Democratic State Senators have officially thrown in the towel. They are, Wayne Bryant from Camden County, the once-powerful Budget Committee chairman who is currently the focus of a US Attorney criminal probe, Bernie Kenny from Hudson County, the current Democratic Senate Leader and Joe Doria, also from Hudson County.
    I find it interesting that more Republicans are stepping down than Democrats... I would have expected the other way around. This, considering that the legendary corruption in New Jersey politics has historically been more associated with the Democratic Party than the GOP. I have the impression that many Garden State Republicans are in the Party for precisely that reason, that many of them would, if they lived in other states, be moderate-to-conservative Democrats.

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