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View Full Version : What is the "Jersey Shore"?



JerseyDevil
07-12-2006, 02:39 PM
I didn't think I would really have to post this, but I was wondering if anyone else had to explain to someone - what the "Jersey Shore" is?

A couple of weeks ago I was talking to my cousin - who lives at the Jersey Shore - Beachwood - and I said something about the Jersey Shore. He said - why do people call it the Jersey Shore - there is no "Jersey Shore" it's going to the beach. I then proceeded to explain to him that the beach was merely the sandy section where you layout and enjoy the "beach". The Jersey Shore is the general area, that not only includes the beach, but also outlying towns. Now I would say that the "Jersey Shore" region includes every EAST of the parkway. If you are going to a Lakewood BlueClaws game, you are not going down the shore. Also, it is even a bit more complicated than that I think, because if you say you are "going down the shore" then you are implying that you will be doing some shore specific activity, whether it's swimming, fishing, boating, etc. of course you could be going to see a play at Surflight Theater in Beach Haven, and you would of couse still be going "down the shore". However, if you are going to just be going to the Ocean County Mall, although you would technically be going "down the Shore", you really wouldn't be doing anything shore specific thereand therefore I woudln't really consider it going "down the shore".

Anyway - for the time being, those are my thoughts on the magnificent "Jersey Shore" which runs 127 miles from Sandy Hook to Cape May Point. :) Does anyone else have any thoughts? BTW - in Oregon, it's going to the coast.

DebbieSans
07-12-2006, 04:12 PM
Hey JD...you explained it beautifully!

Debbie

NJPRIDE
07-12-2006, 08:59 PM
My wife and I are going Down The Shore on Sat. we will be heading to A.C. to see The Pier at Caesars , Mr. Peanut , and get a meal . But before arriving in the new A.C. we have to stop in Spring Lake .:D

Jersey Warren
07-17-2006, 01:24 PM
I think this may depend on your perspective and where you are when you say it. Growing up in Bergen County, we generally regarded anything south of the Raritan River on the Parkway or Route 9 as "the Shore."

When my family moved to Toms River, they considered themselves as living "down the Shore" and when we went to visit them, we always said we were going "down the Shore." The mascot of the Toms River North team is the Mariners. The Parkway is a good general dividing line between shore and non-shore communities in South Jersey, but it may be a little too close to the coast to be regarded as absolute. My family lived a couple of miles West of the Parkway and they still regarded themselves as shore people.

If I had to define "down the shore" I would say any place in Monmouth, Ocean, Atlantic or Cape May counties that is within a half hour's drive (with no traffic) from the actual shoreline. But, as with all definitions, that is completely arbitrary.

P.S. People in Massachusetts also disagree as to where Cape Cod ("the Cape") starts. I always considered the Cape Cod Canal as being the start of the Cape, but some people extend it on the mainland a far north as Plymouth.

davegering
07-20-2006, 04:26 PM
I agree with both dwscriptions of the Jersey Shore. My parents live in Manahawkin which is about 5 miles from LBI. I consider it the shore becauce I am doing Beach Stuff when I go down there most of the time. But when I go down at Christmas time I dont say Im going down the shore i say I am going to my parents. In the summer I say im going down the shore to visist my parents.


Next quwstion is what is the differenc between a SHOBIE and a BENNIE????

JerseyDevil
07-20-2006, 07:47 PM
Next quwstion is what is the differenc between a SHOBIE and a BENNIE????
Well both shoebie and benny are both deragatory terms for a Jersey Shore tourist. Shoebie is a more southern NJ term - and supposedly came about because tourists used to bring their lunch in a shoe box. A Benny is basically an acronym for Bergen, Essex, Newark, New York. A Benny to me is someone who comes to the Jersey Shore and then leaves their trash on the beach and really doesn't care about the cleanliness of the place. It really annoys me when I see people pick up their beach stuff and leave their trash there. When high tide comes it ends up going into the ocean.

BTW - my cousins the one time tried to claim I was a Benny, but since I grew up at the beach - I disagree. I am now living back in Toms River. I am now in my apartment for all those who might be interested. Moved the last of the stuff today. Moving sucks - I hate it.

beatman10
07-20-2006, 08:25 PM
and shoobies, also. "Bennies" came down the shore and paid for their vacations with 100 dollar bills, thus Ben Franklins or "bennies" for short. "Shoobies" could be spotted going into the water with shoes on because they didn't want to hurt their tender feet on the shells. These are just some of the other things people will tell how "benny" and "shoobie" came to be. Pretty much most people (including myself) who live at the shore started off as a benny or shoobie. You do every now and then meet some natives whose families have been there since colonial days! I really don't mind the majority of tourists, though. Most of them are working stiffs like me who just want to enjoy themselves for a few days. But you do get a few out of staters(and you know what 2 states they are) who come down here and act like they are better than us and how "NJ would be nothing without them".

NJPRIDE
07-21-2006, 07:23 PM
I dont care what those knuckleheads " down the shore " call me I just laugh at their ignorance . They dont own the shore like I dont own the beauty in Northwest Jersey . It is for all to share no matter what state they came from , come and enjoy and leave your money !

Pookiebluez
07-28-2006, 02:06 AM
Ahhh! The Jersey Shore! The enigma of the Garden State. (Well, maybe not). To me, "down the shore" Always ment Ocean, Atlantic, and Cape May county. I know, that's not the whole "shore", but that's how I always saw it! :) Seaside Heights, Atlantic City, and Cape May. (BTW, did you guys know that Ocean County, is considered a part of the NYC metro area? I didn't know that. :rolleyes: )

MITHRANDIR
07-30-2006, 01:41 PM
(BTW, did you guys know that Ocean County, is considered a part of the NYC metro area? I didn't know that. :rolleyes: )

Depends on who is doing the defining. ;)

If you go by Cable TV Northern Ocean County is a dividing line between PHL and NYC metro markets.

Geographically, Ocean County is about equidistant from PHL and NYC.
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I generally consider Monmouth, Ocean, Atlantic, Cape May, and parts of Burlington Counties to be part of the Jersey Shore Region.

I think the 1/2 hour driving distance (or aprox. 15 miles {24km}) from the ocean is a good as any arbitrary dividing line as any.

MITHRANDIR
07-30-2006, 02:14 PM
They dont own the shore like I dont own the beauty in Northwest Jersey. It is for all to share no matter what state they came from , come and enjoy and leave your money !

Well said! The beauty of NJ is for all to enjoy.

Roadbldr '59
08-20-2006, 03:22 PM
I didn't think I would really have to post this, but I was wondering if anyone else had to explain to someone - what the "Jersey Shore" is?

A couple of weeks ago I was talking to my cousin - who lives at the Jersey Shore - Beachwood - and I said something about the Jersey Shore. He said - why do people call it the Jersey Shore - there is no "Jersey Shore" it's going to the beach. I then proceeded to explain to him that the beach was merely the sandy section where you layout and enjoy the "beach". The Jersey Shore is the general area, that not only includes the beach, but also outlying towns. Now I would say that the "Jersey Shore" region includes every EAST of the parkway. If you are going to a Lakewood BlueClaws game, you are not going down the shore. Also, it is even a bit more complicated than that I think, because if you say you are "going down the shore" then you are implying that you will be doing some shore specific activity, whether it's swimming, fishing, boating, etc. of course you could be going to see a play at Surflight Theater in Beach Haven, and you would of couse still be going "down the shore". However, if you are going to just be going to the Ocean County Mall, although you would technically be going "down the Shore", you really wouldn't be doing anything shore specific thereand therefore I woudln't really consider it going "down the shore".

Anyway - for the time being, those are my thoughts on the magnificent "Jersey Shore" which runs 127 miles from Sandy Hook to Cape May Point. :) Does anyone else have any thoughts? BTW - in Oregon, it's going to the coast.

Funny you should mention Oregon... I live in Vancouver, Washington now, just across the river from Portland. I drive to the Oregon Coast all the time, in fact I was just there last weekend. The drive over Route 26 Going To The Coast is the rough equivalent of driving Down The Shore from North Jersey on Route 35, our preferred way down to Belmar when I was a kid (and is still whenever I come home). Though the terrain is much different...farmland, mountains and forest instead of quaint beach towns like Navesink and Red Bank... the feeling of anticipation is much the same as you get closer and closer to the beach. Perhaps it's something to do with how the smell of the air changes from smoggy and urban to salty-sweet.

I like the Oregon Coast... but it still ain't the Jersey Shore.