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Dasht
06-24-2006, 12:18 PM
Is there a "Central Jersey" accent? I notice a discernable accent from North and South Jersey residents, but I don't notice a Central Jersey accent.

For instance, from either North of South (I'm not sure which one), I notice that "talk" is pronounced "tawk", emphasis on the "aw". In Central Jersey, I notice "talk" is pronounced simply as "tock." Any particular reason for this discrepancy? Any person who has lived in Central Jersey all his/her life who puts emphasis on the "aww" in talk?

Jersey Warren
06-24-2006, 03:42 PM
Is there a "Central Jersey" accent? I notice a discernable accent from North and South Jersey residents, but I don't notice a Central Jersey accent.

For instance, from either North of South (I'm not sure which one), I notice that "talk" is pronounced "tawk", emphasis on the "aw". In Central Jersey, I notice "talk" is pronounced simply as "tock." Any particular reason for this discrepancy? Any person who has lived in Central Jersey all his/her life who puts emphasis on the "aww" in talk?

I can't shed much light on the Central New Jersey accent, because I was born and lived the first 22 years of my life in Bergen County, in the Northeast corner of the state. People there use the "aw" sound very much: cAWfee, tAWk, wAWk, bAWght, cAWght, etc. We also tend to deemphasize our long A sounds so that tail, pail, and sail come out more like teahll, peahll, and seahll.

The rest of my family moved from Northern New Jersey to the Shore area, which has a mixed influence from both Northern and Central New Jersey. My youngest brother talks (tAWks!) much different than I do (or did).

I can tell you that Northeastern New Jerseyans call a sandwich on an Italian roll a hero, whereas those near Philadelphia call them hoagies and the rest of the state calls them subs.

davegering
06-25-2006, 07:52 AM
I am from Central Jersey I grew up in Old Bridge. If anything my accent leans towards the North Part of Jersey.
Here is another Jersey Quiz I found. http://www.gotoquiz.com/how_new_jersey_are_you

DebbieSans
06-25-2006, 10:45 AM
I was born and raised up in Bergen County and have lived in central Jersey for the past 12 years. The only change in accent I've noticed is how I pronounce words like "coffee"...I used to say "cawfee", and now I say it more like "cahfee". I especially notice this when my stepdaughter visits...she only moved away from Bergen county two years ago and still accents the "aw" big time.

Debbie

usv8lover
06-25-2006, 08:39 PM
I was raised in Colonia, New Jersey (south of Rahway, North of Woodbridge).
No one there had that accent which seems to be more prevalent the closer you get to New Yawk City.

Wendy

DebbieSans
06-25-2006, 09:54 PM
Yep, that's true. The town where I lived in Bergen County was only about 20 minutes from the city.

Deb

JerseyDevil
06-25-2006, 11:18 PM
I was raised in Colonia, New Jersey (south of Rahway, North of Woodbridge).
No one there had that accent which seems to be more prevalent the closer you get to New Yawk City.

As I always try telling people - the so-called "New Jersey" accent is really a Naw Yawk accent which extends across the river. Also, much of the accent is influneced by Italians - which are a very big ethnic group in NJ.

usv8lover
06-26-2006, 07:52 AM
I can tell you that Northeastern New Jerseyans call a sandwich on an Italian roll a hero, whereas those near Philadelphia call them hoagies and the rest of the state calls them subs.

In Colonia we had the sub shop. Everyone called them subs.
In the Princeton, NJ are and Philly they are hoagies.
I always wondered why what you call a sandwhich is regional...Kind of strange.

Then you have soda vs. pop...Is "pop" old school?

Wendy

Nvme
06-28-2006, 12:35 PM
I'm in north Jersey and we call the heros or subs and never a hoagie.

I think the " pop " is old school also.

Jersey Warren
06-28-2006, 02:31 PM
I first encountered "pop" (for soda) in Wheeling, West Virginia. That term seems prevalent in the Midwest, from the Ohio Valley west of Pittsburgh/Wheeling and westward to at least Chicago.

The "old school" New Englanders used to call soda "tonic," but that term is dying out in favor of soda.

One thing I missed after leaving New Jersey was birch beer, especially when served from a large barrel at a rural roadside stand.

Would you believe that someone actually started a website for the purpose of plotting where people say pop or soda or tonic?

Here it is:

http://www.popvssoda.com/

Dasht
06-28-2006, 10:20 PM
When saying words like "dreaming" or "talking", do you say the "g"? Or do you say "dreamin" and "talkin"

JerseyDevil
06-29-2006, 01:04 AM
Dasht - I merged your two threads.

When saying words like "dreaming" or "talking", do you say the "g"? Or do you say "dreamin" and "talkin"
I say dreaming and talking. dreamin and talkin is more like the south than New Jersey, although the New York accent cuts off the last of those words too. When I lived out in Indiana - my family was constantly told how we articulated our words fully and properly. The only complaint I ever heard had nothing to do with an accent, but with the speed we talked. We would be told to constantly slow down because they couldn't understand what we were saying because of the speed. For the most part - the New Jersey accent is a stereotype which has been fully excagerated by the media, comedians and late night talk show people. If you want to hear what most people think is a New Jersey accent, then you have to go into Brookyn NY.

Jersey Warren
06-29-2006, 02:42 PM
If I want to offer a celebrity example of someone who has a real New Jersey accent (at least as my family speaks) I usually cite Alan Alda. Although he was born in New York, he lived for years in New Jersey. To me, he sounds like someone from New Jersey. This is interesting tidbit from Alda's biography:

"He commuted from LA to his home in New Jersey every weekend for 11 years while starring in "M*A*S*H" (1972). His wife and daughters lived in NJ, and he did not want to uproot the family to LA, especially because he did not know how long the show would last."

JerseyDevil
06-29-2006, 04:25 PM
"He commuted from LA to his home in New Jersey every weekend for 11 years while starring in "M*A*S*H" (1972). His wife and daughters lived in NJ, and he did not want to uproot the family to LA, especially because he did not know how long the show would last."
He also loved NJ and didn't want to move out to LA. He made it part of his contract to star in MASH. I often tell people about Alan Alda. There are so many celebrities who either live or originate from New Jersey, it would make people's heads spin. Basiclaly - you can't see a movie without having one of the stars be from NJ. I just found out that Oprah Winfrey at the Jersey Shore in Lavallette. Although she's not from NJ and doesn't live here - many stars have vacation homes in NJ. King of Morraco had a home in NJ as did Janqualine Kennedy Onnasis. Former King of Spain lived in NJ - Joseph Bonaparte - Napolean's brother. Anyway - this is really off subject, but it does show you how little people know about NJ, because most people would not expect stars to be buying vacation homes or living in NJ.