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davegering
01-26-2006, 12:20 PM
Just saw on the news that Corzines advisers are telling him to raise taxes on Gasoline,Cable TV and to include Clothing on the 6 percent sales tax to help balance the budget. Lets hope it is not so. The clothing tax would hurt businesses in NJ because people travel from NY and Penn. to go to our malls and shops to save on the tax.

JerseyDevil
01-26-2006, 09:51 PM
I'm really not that surprised. It's the easy way out. Instead of streamlining government, and working on what is causing NJ to spend more and more money, they just tax the citizens or businesses. I wsh that if I got into finacial trouble, I could just charge more to make up the difference. That is basically what is going on - NJ is charging MORE to live here, even though it is not running efficiently. For all practical purposes, government is the true monopoly - the only thing is that we are the oneswho voted for these people to be in office. If New Jerseyans don't like being taxed to death - why do we keep voting in the same type of politicians over and over again.

BTW - I have heard, even by people within the government, that Corzine has his sights ste on tghe presidency and that he is just going to put NJ on cruise control until the elections. So that's just great, another 2 years of a do nothing governor. :roll:

MITHRANDIR
01-27-2006, 06:38 PM
Instead of streamlining government, and working on what is causing NJ to spend more and more money, they just tax the citizens or businesses. I wsh that if I got into finacial trouble, I could just charge more to make up the difference. That is basically what is going on - NJ is charging MORE to live here, even though it is not running efficiently.
. . .
So that's just great, another 2 years of a do nothing governor.:roll:

Doing nothing may be preferable to doing harm to our state. :eek:

I also wish that gov't would try to be more efficient at what it does before it decides that more money is needed to run gov't.

Government may also come to the conclusion that certain jobs are not gov't's responsibility.

davegering,

I have heard similar reports about Corzine as well. If a tax is put on clothing, it would encourage me to do shoping in MD or VA when I visit family down there. (IIRC, sales tax on clothing in MD and VA is 5% and 4.5% repectively)

5% is not much, but it does add up when added to other proposed tax increases.

Gannet News - Courierpostonline (http://www.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060108/NEWS01/601080369/1006/ARCHIVES)



"This is finally the day of reckoning," said James W. Hughes, a Rutgers University dean and expert on the state economy. "In the past three years we've maintained our standard of living the old-fashioned way by borrowing and living off core assets."




"We don't have a revenue problem in the state of New Jersey; we have an expenditure problem," McCormac said. "We collect more money per capita than any state in the country. The problem is we spend it all."

JerseyDevil
03-22-2006, 10:07 PM
Well MR Taxman has taken office. I suppose none of us really expected much less than for Corzine to further tax New Jerseyans. I will have some comments regarding this, but one thing I find interesting is that as a businessman - he didn't change anything to make NJ more attractive to businesses after McGreevey made NJ one of the worst states to have a business in. Businesses are leaving NJ, and with them, their tax dollars and the jobs they provide. By further taxing them, all the do is just move somewhere else.

I also have to laugh whenever I see Katz, who he had the affair with, get on TV praising Corzine. Is it really any surprise that Corzine will be cutting government personnel, but supposedly anyone in the union is safe?

Well anyway, anyone who would like to watch the budget address they can view it on NJN - 2006 Corzine Budget Address (http://www.njn.net/newspublicaffairs/coverage/budgetmessage06.html)

BTW - as was pointed out, people are going to feel the hit in higher property taxes, even though Corzine gave a "small" rebate increase. He froze benefits to towns and cities, so they will pass that onto their local citizens through higher property taxes.

I like how the Trentonian reader said that Corzine was preparing to Floriorize the state's taxpayers. Well if that is truly the case, well then i suppose it will be only a matter of time when New Jerseyans start having the Impeach Corzine bumper stickers like they did with Florio. New Jerseyans have to start demanding more from our politicitions.

By the way - one of the ways they could help the budget, even modestly is to call off the deal with the New YORK Red Bulls for their stadium and then also, kill the Giants and Jets deal. We are giving too much away with those deals in comparison to what we get out. Hell - we don't even get any money from all the ticket sales of any events that take place in the new statdium like we currently do. But hey, our politicians seem to be NY puppets, so what else is new.

According to the Trentonian, Corzine is increasing taxes by $1.5 billion, while at the same time INCREASING spending by $2.6 billion.

Marianita
03-28-2006, 07:21 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, The only thing that can be said in Corzines behalf is that the tax problem and deficit was already there when he came into office. He quite simply does not know how to deal with it.Imagine the property taxes going higher then they already are? Or taxing clothing which is quite ridiculous as people come from different places to buy it and save money? What Corzine needs to do is find out where the money is going and why is it spent as soon as it comes in. I was anxious to see how he would manage but it did not take me long to figure out that he seems to not know where to begin. He could make the state of New Jersey too costly for anyone to live in. He needs to get busy and find a way to lower property taxes. Isn't that what he promised to do anyway? That was the first thing he said when he came into office. Marianita

JerseyDevil
03-28-2006, 07:34 PM
I'm not surprised he doesn't know where to begin - he's too busy protecting his cronies and the unions.

As for why the money is spent as soon as it comes in - that's easy - NJ has a huge bureacracy with everyone having their hand out. Instead of finding ways to bring more taxes in from the outside - Corzine is just taxing the people in the state so the people who can afford it will just leave. of course all this does is leave the burden on the poorer residents who can't leave the state. Then while businesses leave the state because of the anti-business policies, unemployment rises, causing even more poverty and lower tax base.

Do I believe corzine will have a positive affect on the state - no I don't. I was hoping that as a business person he would find ways to bring in businesses and promote NJ. But as I've seen, he is just tax and spend - he just shifted the spending around. Government employees are being cut back - whch isn't an issue - but he managed to protect the UNION employees.

Oh wel we'll see what he does in four years. So far he looks like another Florio.

As for the property tax - he's already reneged on that promise. He isn't restoring the full rebate like he promised and on top of that he CUT funding to townships - so now in order for those townships not to have a deficit they will have to RAISE property taxes, because now they aren't getting the money from the state.

NJPRIDE
03-28-2006, 08:47 PM
All I can say is the politicians in Trenton better be REAL carefull because they know their cans are on the line ! And using the word can is being nice , but I will not be too nice if they continue to screw up with OUR money !

JerseyDevil
03-28-2006, 09:12 PM
All I can say is the politicians in Trenton better be REAL carefull because they know their cans are on the line ! And using the word can is being nice , but I will not be too nice if they continue to screw up with OUR money !
Nothing is going to change unless New Jerseyans actually wake up. Do you realize that property taxes been issue since the late 1800's? I'm not sure how much of an issue - if it central campaign issue or what, but this is ridiculous that 100 years later people are complaining about the same thing. Even after 30 years, something should have been done, more than just that ridiculous rebate program that just causes paper work, and thus causes money to be spent to manage.

Marianita
03-28-2006, 11:37 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, New Jersey pride, You won't believe this one. I read in the Times that Corzine is going to spend four million dollars to preserve historical landmarks and parks for future generations. This is all well and good if there is money to do it with but the state of New Jersey does not have it to spare. I wonder where the money is going to come from for this and why it cannot wait until other issues are dealt with. There are immediate concerns and Corzine is sidestepping them. Preserving landmarks can wait until the right time. I cannot believe I read this. From the article I get the impression that there is no money for this sort of thing. That does not sound like a man who is interested in lowering property taxes. Marianita

Marianita
04-27-2006, 06:09 PM
Jersey Devil, Jersey Warren, check this out.. I read it today in the Bridgeton news. Tell me what you think.
Corzine is cutting these things: 1.5 million to cut the ''clean elections pilot program'' whatever that is. lol. He is cutting 1.5 million on the ''Battleship NJ museum'', 1.5 million on faith based charities iniaitive'', place a levy on registering cars costing more then $45,00 or less then 19 miles to the gallon. He is cutting 10 million from the snow removal fund, also cuts totalling more then 150 million for public 4 yr colleges and universities. and last but not least, he is looking to end the practice of state road crews to clean up ''road kill.'' Rather interesting don't you think? I wonder who gets to clean up the road kill. Apparently there is a 4.5 billion $$ deficit which sounds like alot of money to me but he is cutting some valuable programs. Universities are of utmost importance. What are your feelings on this? It causes me concern. Marianita:mad:

JerseyDevil
04-27-2006, 06:25 PM
You lef tout that he still is giving $85 million to build the former MetroStars - now known as the New YORK Red Bulls their stadium. He also gave the Giants and Jets naming right to the ENTIRE Meadowlands sports complex, yet New Jersey will see none of that money.

Also, government employees are being cut, but not the union workers. [insert comment here on Katz and Corzine's relationship] ;)

I think it's more o the same - tax and spend. He didn't cut spending, spending actually increased I believe by 1.5 billion dollars. He also is looking at selling the NJ toll roads. :roll:

Marianita
04-28-2006, 07:29 PM
My goodness but the Bridgeton news left that part out. 85,000,00 is alot of loot and NJ will see none of it? It is a disgrace. Is Corzine from New York or what? I believe that the deficit will just increase and nothing will be gained. I I just read on South Jersey news that Corzine is thinking of revising an old 1949 law to make it possible for people to pump their own gas and maybe saving .6 a gallon. Big deal. Like that is going to help alot. It may help a little but New Jerseans are not used to pumping their own gas and besides it will put gas station attendents out of a job. Why have attendents if they do not pump gas? What a shame. I am wondering where all this will lead to. Marianita:mad:

JerseyDevil
04-28-2006, 07:56 PM
My goodness but the Bridgeton news left that part out. 85,000,00 is alot of loot and NJ will see none of it? It is a disgrace. Is Corzine from New York or what?

The team will be playing in NJ - but is called the NY Red Bulls. They have no association with NY, they chose the name because they feel NJ is an embarrassment and NY has more cache. This is why I am working on the the DropNY.com website. We pay the money, NY gets all the recognition and even more people are made to believe that Nj is just a surbub of NY and Philadelphia.



I believe that the deficit will just increase and nothing will be gained. I I just read on South Jersey news that Corzine is thinking of revising an old 1949 law to make it possible for people to pump their own gas and maybe saving .6 a gallon. Big deal. Like that is going to help alot. It may help a little but New Jerseans are not used to pumping their own gas and besides it will put gas station attendents out of a job. Why have attendents if they do not pump gas? What a shame. I am wondering where all this will lead to. Marianita:mad:
As I said in the past - I don't use the term "South" Jersey, espicially capitalize. There is no South Jersey or North Jersey, only New Jersey. I prefer the terms northern New Jersey or southern New Jersey. :)

As for the self serve, it is amazing that NO news media has pointed out that the ONLY way having self serve gas stations can bring about a reduction in gas cost is by gas stations to fire all their gas station attendants. The cost of full service is SOLELY in the wages of the gas station attendant. :roll:

Corzine is grasping at straws. He has no plans, he has no vision and all he sees is basically tax and spend.

Marianita
04-29-2006, 10:14 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, It takes a govenor with a plan and as you said vision. Corzine lacks the experience so it seems to deal with a huge deficit. He wants to cut in many areas and spend in others which accomplishes absolutely nothing except to remain a deficit. If he put gas station attendents out of a job they will apply for unemployment. That is one example of his lacking vision. He has to think of what the end result will be. Maybe he is loaded with money but not everyone else is. And to cut for colleges and universities is downright stupid. People need their education. Nothing on this earth is going to get any cheaper, you can bet on that. Common sense will tell you that all he is doing is moving money around, taking from here to give to there. Now what does that accomplish. I do not trust his methods of governing because I do not think he knows what he is doing. Looks like New Jersey is too much of a challenge for him. I hope he shapes up and does a good job in that lovely state. Marianita:mad:

Marianita
04-29-2006, 11:23 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, I just read in the Times that Corzines popularity has really plummeted. McGreevey fared alot better. Now Corzine wants to raise the state taxes which is a major part of his losing popularity. In his case it is just tax this and tax that, raise the state tax to 7 % if I am correct on that. Ofcourse people are aware that Corzine inherited the deficit and did not cause it but he does not have the faintest idea what to do with the deficit. He is making the New Jersey residents upset. The property taxes are so high already and for him to tax everything else including valuable programs is a bit much. I wonder where this will all lead. It would seem if he has to make cuts to do it gradually and to be careful of what programs he cuts. Now take road kill for example. Imagine cutting that? Someone has to clean it up. Lord help us all. Marianita

drabin
07-05-2006, 11:20 AM
While Corzine blames the legislature, his approach is to further cripple revenue in the state by driving business and consumers out. He should be imperached for malfeasance!! Join the Chorus!!

Meanwhile let's decrease big state expenses and get back to reality with a budget that can work!!

Marianita
07-05-2006, 07:31 PM
Corzine needs to go as Dave said. He is going to ruin the economy. Obviously he does not know what to do now that the situation is clearly out of control. tax this. tax that. That's all he knows. It looks as if we are facing a real crisis. I feel that the people of New Jersey should have a say on where the money goes and how it is to be used. I believe it is 1 million dollars a day being lost on lottery tickets.So people are going to Philly to purchase them. Increasing taxes is not really the answer but less spending might. The money is sure going somewhere. Marianita:mad:

lordmarc
07-12-2006, 04:45 PM
What is sad is that Politicians in New Jersey have multiple pensions. If anyone serves one year on any N.J. Assembly, that person gets benefits for life. Our taxes are up because we need to support these people. Last weeks FAKE shut down of the state show, was to insult the people in excepting the tax increase. One question, how do we, the people benefit from Corzines taxes? The national interest rates went up so Real Estate is DEAD in N.J. right now. If you want to feel good, remember we help support multiple pensions and life long benefits for N.J. Politicians. I find ways to avoid the tax increase that I don't want to afford. I recently quit the NYSC, which is being taxed under Corzines plan and joined the YMCA, A non prophet organization, which cannot be taxed. I will do more shopping on Ebay, and Wal-marts. I believe in Unions, Unfortunately, I cant afford to support them. I need to save money elsewhere to pay Corzines taxes. I have to shop at Non Union Stores like Wal-marts because they are cheaper then any store in any Mall. He taxing tanning solons, but he has not taxed the sun, a natural tanning salon, but I'm sure a Solar tax is going to be next for Corzine and then a gravity tax. . I hate these decisions, but Mr Corzine help me make them with his actions. I just wish Corzine would explain how N.J. benefits having him as Governor. He raised my taxes and his home rebate plan is a joke. Taxes will rise $1000 next year and he will give us $250 back. Its like doubling the price at a store and having a 25% sale on everything. I love that he calls it a penny increase, its a 16% increase on every dollar. I also wish NJ would declare July 29 and 30 National Stay home and BBQ day. We also need to stop justifying $3.00 a gallon gas.

I beat up Dawn Guzzo
07-12-2006, 06:45 PM
I agree with lordmarc, he states that the state shut down was a sham!!! It WAS!!! Corzine's whole purpose was to raise the taxes by 1% and by shutting down the state (AT THE COST OF STATE RESIDENTS) residents of NJ would be happy to pay any increase as long as the state was running again!!! It was a stale mate and NJ residents were the victims. What should actually happen is to, of course, vote out the HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES and LEGISLATURE members, this is to show the power's that be 2 things- 1) NJ residents won't stand for guerilla tacticts by HOR & LEG members, 2) Forces the HOR & LEG member to live by the laws that they enacted.:lmao: :eek:

NJPRIDE
07-12-2006, 09:06 PM
I suggest that we dont just talk about getting rid of the S.O.Bs in Trenton but DO IT ! I WILL NOT VOTE DEMOCRAT IN NOVEMBER . I will keep this promise !

Marianita
07-13-2006, 12:00 AM
Hi Lordmarc, It is quite possible that Corzine was aware that the people would agree to the tax increase just to get the shut down over with. It is also possible that he did it in desperation because he quite simply does not know what to do. The tax increase will not make a notable difference in property taxes. It is not enough money. Now he made a comment that the spending would have to be stopped and he is the one doing the spending. He said he is prepared for some fallout and I am betting he is. He may get recalled. Why is that these people have benefits for life anyway? The tax payers have to pay for that. The problems are so searious now with the deficit and the property taxes that it will take someone who knows how to handle it to fix it. Increasing the sales tax will cost the people more, not less. You can bet that clothing will be taxed. Everything will be taxed because Corzine will see to it. The man needs to go. He is ruining the state with his tendency to tax everything. He has had some strange ideas from cutting from universities to having people pump their own gas to eliminating crews to clean up road kill.The spending goes on and on. I hope he is not reelected in Nov. Lets get him out. Marianita:mad:

I beat up Dawn Guzzo
07-13-2006, 01:35 AM
Technically, the blame is on every resident of NJ who votes Democrat, I am an Independent, but the difference between Democrat & Republican is: Democrats spend money and Republicans don't. NO political party is better than the other except the Democrats SPEND, SPEND, SPEND.. and who pays for it... why the people who elected the joker. If the residents don't want any more taxes STOP VOTING DEMOCRAT it's that simple. Impeachment of Corizine is a good thing....... but most importantly vote OUT the House of Representatives and Legislature....... by the way.... most members of the House and Legislature are employed by a major company, the monies they earn as a political member is extra (not their only income) THEY ARE FAT CATS ON THE BACK OF EACH AND EVERY RESIDENT... know how to stop it... VOTE THEM OUT. November is a good month because you get to remove each and every house member. what you do is know who is currently in the house and legislature, KNOW THERE NAMES... 2nd go to the voting booths and don't vote for them, vote for the other party.... then the people will be giving a message!!! and of course when it's time to elect a new govenor do 2 things... vote REPUBLICAN and don't vote for Corizine....

ilovenj
07-13-2006, 01:00 PM
You crybabies make me sick. You choose to live in New Jersey and refuse to pay the price. We live in the best state and have the best Governor. Mr. Corzine has to fix our budget and he has pulled off a miracle. People in New Jersey should be grateful to have a leader like Mr. Corzine. If our Politicians have more then one pension, then I say they deserve it. They make good laws and arrange quality of life for us in New Jersey. I for one support Mr. Corzines tax plans and will fully support it. I'm proud to be from New Jersey and proud to say I have voted for Mr. Corzine and will pay happily his tax increases to help my state. Mr. Corzine has my full support, I salute him in his decisions to fix our budget. I guess we all have to pay a penny more to fix our state. Its our home, We should pay with feel honored that we as a group are fixing our budget.

JerseyDevil
07-13-2006, 04:21 PM
I'm proud to be from NJ too and love this state - but let's look at who got NJ into this mess - the politicians. So instead of them paying for it and reducing spending - they lay the burden on New Jersey tax payers.

As for Crozine fixing the budget mess - he only "fixed it" if you want to call it that - for this one year. He increased spending which REQUIRED him to put the tax in place. If government funding was frozen or cut - then we wouldn't have been socked with the raise in taxes. NJ is one of the most taxed state in the nation - yet we get very little for our money. The politicans have to go - including Corzine. Next year, or a few years from now - the politicians will be singing the same tune about the budget. There have been many many promises of - if we raise this or that tax right now - we will solve the budget forevert. I swear, you must really have blinders on if you think that Corzine actually fixed it this time. You are the exact type of voter that I say is the problem with the NJ government. You elect them, don't hold them accountable and then praise them when they taxc us for their mismangement and over spending.

lordmarc
07-13-2006, 05:24 PM
I agree with I beat up Dawn Guzzo. I think we in N.J. need to vote out the Democrats.I beat up Dawn Guzzo states "Democrats spend money and Republicans don't. NO political party is better than the other except the Democrats SPEND, SPEND, SPEND.. and who pays for it... why the people who elected the joker. If the residents don't want any more taxes STOP VOTING DEMOCRAT it's that simple. Impeachment of Corizine is a good thing....... but most importantly vote OUT the House of Representatives and Legislature....... by the way.... most members of the House and Legislature are employed by a major company, the monies they earn as a political member is extra (not their only income) THEY ARE FAT CATS ON THE BACK OF EACH AND EVERY RESIDENT... know how to stop it... VOTE THEM OUT."
I beat up Dawn Guzzo says it all in the one paragraph. I know in November I will vote out Democrats in N.J. If Democrats win again, then N.J. residents votes for taxes. Taxes that are used to take care of N.J. currupt politicans. As for ilovenj, Your Mr Corzine willl one day make the Mafia pay, that our taxes support, taxes on the cocaine you must be snorting, passing the taxes on to you.

lordmarc
07-13-2006, 08:27 PM
Lets all also remember Corzine was a N.J. State Senator. A Senator goes to a Governer the same way Admiral goes to a Captain. He sat above the Governer. I laugh when Corzine acts suprised about N.J. Budget problems. Instead he raises our taxes to suppport his currupt State Assembly friends. he shuts the Government down ( Except the Tollbooths) and looks like a hero when he reopens it only on his terms. Remember N.J., he was our Senator for 5 years. Yet he is suprised about our budget. He just increased revenue to make sure the Multiple Pensions can continue to go through. Im sure everyone on the State Assembly got a raise. Thanks to Corzine, We the people pay more so his people make more. The true meaning of a Ponzi is life in N.J. Read what a Ponzi Scheme is and comapre to Corzine and his tax plans Its amazing that N.J. was cought in the original Ponzi Scheme

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ponzi

JerseyDevil
07-13-2006, 08:33 PM
Lordmarc - although I agree with you on Corzine's recent tax raising and so forth - I have to correct you on his position. He was not as NJ State Senator, he was a US Senator and hence his role is to represent NJ interests at the federal level and had nothing to do with the state government until his election to governor. That being said, you must ask yourself why NJ gives the most of any state to the federal government, but gets the least amount of money in return.

Jon Corzine - Vote Smart (http://www.vote-smart.org/bio.php?can_id=MNJ58252)

JerseyDevil
07-13-2006, 08:37 PM
You crybabies make me sick. You choose to live in New Jersey and refuse to pay the price. We live in the best state and have the best Governor. Mr. Corzine has to fix our budget and he has pulled off a miracle. People in New Jersey should be grateful to have a leader like Mr. Corzine. If our Politicians have more then one pension, then I say they deserve it. They make good laws and arrange quality of life for us in New Jersey. I for one support Mr. Corzines tax plans and will fully support it. I'm proud to be from New Jersey and proud to say I have voted for Mr. Corzine and will pay happily his tax increases to help my state. Mr. Corzine has my full support, I salute him in his decisions to fix our budget. I guess we all have to pay a penny more to fix our state. Its our home, We should pay with feel honored that we as a group are fixing our budget.
After reading this again - I have to ask if this is all said with deep sarcasm, for surely you can NOT truly feel this way about what Corzine has done. :p

lordmarc
07-13-2006, 08:49 PM
I wont argue, you could be right. But I cut this from Wikipedia

"Entry into politics
Leaving Goldman Sachs in January 1999, Corzine campaigned for one of New Jersey's Senate seats after Frank Lautenberg announced his retirement. Corzine was elected to the Senate by a narrow margin over his Republican opponent Bob Franks in November 2000 and was sworn into the Senate in January 2001. He spent $62,802,999 on his campaign, the most expensive Senate campaign in US history - over $35 million of this was spent on the primary election alone, where he ran against former Governor James Florio."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_corzine

I know Im right about Corzines Ponzi Scheme, We pay , get nothing new for our tax dollars and his buddies get multiple pensions

JerseyDevil
07-13-2006, 09:09 PM
I wont argue, you could be right. But I cut this from Wikipedia

Lordmarc - I'm not arguing about the Ponzi Scheme. I'm actually not that familar with that. I was just saying that he was a US Senator. BTW - his relationship with Katz speaks volumes also. She was his mistress and he protects the unions at all costs.

ilovenj
07-14-2006, 12:12 PM
Im glad most of you agree with me. Its refreshing to know Mr.Corzine has experience in NJ politics as a senater. this should make everyone more relieved to pay his much needed sales tax tomorrow. I look forward to my first purchase with the 7% sales tax. It gives me a feeling of teamwork. I feel like I am fixing the NJ budget problems. I salute all the democrats in NJ who make this a wonderful place to live. I know they will win over the republicans this and every November. You people want to continue your high quality life in NJ then stop complaining about a penny tax. Pay it with pride
:lol:

I beat up Dawn Guzzo
07-14-2006, 03:32 PM
ilove nj is ignorant, to declare himself as right and that everyone agrees with him is just as childish as the fact he can't spell nor does he know his math. Let's all help ilove nj, so he can understand reality of his beloved Governor Corizine, ready now... let's take the first step:
Corizine, Holding a state hostage with mafia-like antics such as turning off the state until he gets his way (in regards to Corizine it was the 1% sales tax raise -- which by the way is more than the penny the ilove nj will so proudly pay today) cost residents several millions of dollars that needs to be repaid is a serious tactic, mafia - guerilla like tactic, that should have been deployed if and only if there truly was a deadlock - NOT because he didn't get his way because he wanted a 1% sales tax!!!! First it was an abuse of power, Second it was unnecessary, Three it served its purpose - to put the scare in the residents to show what his power can do, sort of like something a Mafia Wiseguy might do. Corizine is happy to have ilovenj and people just like him because it will keep him in office and will allow Corizine to have perfect working drones like ilovenj to pay his oulandish taxes!!

NJPRIDE
07-14-2006, 10:24 PM
I do not care what stats anyone gives me about corzine and his cronnies in Trenton , they (dems) must go in Nov. They made N.J. a national disgrace and must pay! I will keep a promise unlike politicians , I WILL NOT vote for any democrat in Nov. and that includes menendez! KEAN and Republicans all the way!:D

lordmarc
07-15-2006, 12:03 PM
Well we got Furor Corzine's tax today. I agree with" I beat up Dawn Guzzo". Furor Corzine held our State Hostage to get his tax increase to pay off his Mafia friends and Multiple Pensions. This November, ALL DEMOCRATS MUST GO. "I beat up Dawn Guzzo" makes the most sense here. If we continue to allow these Democrats to rule our state , then we the people will live under dictatorship. We need to stop fighting the wrong terrorists in this country. Its time to take back our Country from the real American threat. Mafia Politicians who are crippling the American Economy. Its time for me to pay Furor Corzines taxes. Verizon must go and Vonage is coming soon to my house hold. I have to cut back and Furor Corzine has made decisions that I must pay so multiple pensions can continue. Companies like Verizon must go, Shopping malls must go, hello Wal-Mart. I already said Goodbye to the NYSC and joined YMCA. Thank you Furor Corzine, I hope your evil assembly enjoy the benefits of NJ, We paid for it with our blood, I should say, you STOLE our blood to support your multiple pensions. I'm banging my Chest and saying " Hi Corzine".

I beat up Dawn Guzzo
07-15-2006, 10:15 PM
:) Sig Heil Corizine, the new Furor!! (Too bad he can't commit suicide in a bunker, such is reality) :p but......... The great residents of NJ, especially lordmarc will agree, that to start an IMPEACHMENT of Corizine is, the only alternative. Corizine has wronged the residents of NJ, he has turned off the state which by the way caused many hardworking people to lose lots of money and caused a huge deficit by the millions which could have gone to state services or charities or.... raised the salaries of hard working state-city-county employees who only recieve ONE pention, raised sales tax, protects unions (which is mob related), allows multiple pentions to his cronies, hires family in positions they are not qualified for, and had an affair. Anyone, who works in the U.S. did one or all of these things would be terminated from their jobs, so why not terminate Corizine? It only makes sense. I agree with lordmarc, he is a furor, he thinks he is the ultimate power and he uses scare tactics on the good hardworking people of NJ. I for one feel that a petition should be started IMMEDIATELY to IMPEACH this crooked, unlawful man.

lordmarc
07-16-2006, 01:00 AM
:mad: Corzine has stolen food money from the people of N.J. so he can give N.J. Assemby workers more pension money, I mean multiple pensions. People are so close to Bankrupsy and trusted Corzine to help the people of N.J. What does he do, he hurt everyone in N.J. by his taxes for the sole purpose of paying multiple pensions to the real terrorists of N.J., Our Mafia Government. He is making us pay more so he can pay multiple pensions. Only one member of our State Assembly gave up ap pension. Mr. Cody, its your turn and others to give back our money and stop being greedy .You people are no better then the terrorists. You attack our Constitution with your greed for multiple pensions. In the Bible, it states "That its easier for a camel to enter the eye of a needle then it is for a rich man to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. As "I beat up Dawn Guzzo says "Sig Heil Corizine" :mad:

NJPRIDE
07-16-2006, 01:09 AM
All I can say is I hope everyone remembers what the dems did to us at voting time in Nov. We all have to vote them OUT! Remember people, remember!

lordmarc
07-16-2006, 01:15 AM
Are Democrats the answer to these problems? They feel the best way to cure cancer is to kill the patient. Im sure I beat up Dawn Guzzo would agree.


This is what the Democrats have done for us, and they get multiple pensions.

NEW JERSEY STANDARD OF LIVING:
New Jersey has the highest auto insurance rates in the nation.
New Jersey has the highest property taxes in the nation.
New Jersey has the highest cigarette tax in the nation.
New Jersey has the second highest statewide housing costs in the nation: 73% above the national average!
New Jersey has the third highest cost of doing business in the nation.
New Jersey has the fourth highest health insurance costs in the nation.
New Jersey has the fifth highest amount of tax-supported debt in the nation.
New Jersey's overall cost of living is 32% above the national average. Why pay such a premium to live in New Jersey when you could live in a place that is both nice and has a reasonable cost of living?
New Jersey collects income taxes, sales taxes, property taxes, sin taxes, casino taxes, tourism taxes, and highway tolls, yet the state has massive budget problems. Where the hell is all of that money going? At least I know where it is coming from: your pockets!
New Jersey ranks first in the nation in per-pupil spending, but its students' only achieve average reading and math scores.
New Jersey is the most densely populated and overcrowded state in the nation. Hope you like standing in long lines and sitting in traffic jams.
The Jersey shore (don't say beaches) is vastly overrated. First, you have to fight your way through traffic jams and toll booths. Next, you have to pay for parking. Then you have to pay for beach tags to use a public beach! Finally, the ocean will be murky, freezing cold, or filled with jellyfish.
Atlantic City will always be a cut-rate resort compared to Las Vegas.

lordmarc
07-16-2006, 01:19 AM
Lawmaker giving up multiple pensions
Posted by the Asbury Park Press on 05/22/06
BY KIM BROWN
GANNETT NEW JERSEY
Assemblyman Christopher "Kip" Bateman, R-Somerset, is putting his money where his mouth is.

An Assembly member since 1994, he recently gave up pensions for serving as municipal prosecutor in the boroughs of Peapack-Gladstone and Bound Brook and is in the process of giving up a third pension for holding the same position in Bridgewater.

He discussed the issue last week at a meeting with editors of the Courier News, Bridgewater.

"I hope in a small way this will help. It's not going to change anything overnight, but if we continue to talk about it, it will change," he said. "There's a lot of reasons I'm in government, but I don't want people thinking I'm in it to get a big, fat pension. That's not why I'm in it."

Although he is giving up three pensions, he is still entitled to one for serving in the Legislature. In addition, Bateman is an attorney with DiFrancesco, Bateman, Coley, Yospin, Kunzman, Davis & Lehrer. The Warren firm represents a number of towns and planning boards.

For a legislator to earn multiple pensions is not unusual. At least one-third of legislators have more than one state-funded pension, Bateman estimated. The process is known as tacking: Politicians "tack" several part-time jobs together to create a huge pension.

A Gannett New Jersey review of pension data from 2002, completed last year, showed that at least $238 million was paid in salaries to 9,500 individuals holding 24,700 government jobs. That represents 3 percent of the entire payroll in local, county and state government, excluding police, firefighters and teachers.

Two bills co-sponsored by Bateman aim to end the practice of tacking and the drain it creates on the state budget.

The first, A-696, would require a legislator with more than one job in the Public Employees' Retirement System to choose one position for which they would receive pension credit. A second bill, A-119, would apply to anyone in the state retirement system. People hired after the bill becomes law would have to choose one position as the basis of their pension.

Despite words of support from several legislators, both bills have been stalled for several years.

While the private sector has sharply cut pension and health insurance benefits, the state has gone the opposite way. The Legislature voted with uncommon bipartisan cooperation to enhance benefits in June 2001 for its members after the pension fund's assets already had been dwindling.

Any substantive change in the law would require legislators to take on public employees, a major voting block. Last year, New Jersey had about 514,000 employees contributing to the pension fund, 210,000 retired employees receiving pensions and 358,000 active and retired workers receiving health benefits.

With a projected $4.5 billion budget deficit, Bateman believes that time has come.

"Down the road it will cost me thousands of dollars, but we need to show the public where we stand," he said." "We need to do something to change the system."

http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060522/NEWS/605220317/1001/rss

lordmarc
07-16-2006, 01:43 AM
A Democrat went parachute jumping. He leapt out of the plane, felt the rush of the wind and saw the ground getting closer. After a few seconds he reached for the rip cord to open his parachute. Just then an angel flew by and said he him, "If you love the Lord don't pull that rip cord." The Democrat was very religious, so he took his hand away from the rip cord, saying, "Yes sir, I do love the Lord. A few seconds later, the ground was a lot closer and his body began to be really tense. Once again, he reached for the rip cord--and the angel flew by again, saying, "If you love the Lord don't pull that rip cord." The Democrat's faith was strong and he took his hand away again. A few seconds later--splat!--the Democrat hit the earth and was killed instantly. And as the angel flew away he said to himself, "I don't know how I got to be an angel when I hate Democrats so much."

I beat up Dawn Guzzo
07-17-2006, 05:54 PM
:eek: The joke is cute, but I have also heard it a different way, but it is all the same:D :D :D With all the information that is out about Corizine and all that he has done, it stands to reason he should be impeached. Don't forget when voting a new REPUBLICAN governor, though I am sure by minipulation and counting on the fact that people forget, Corizine will go to extended lenghts to paint a picture of his excellent governorship (ilovenj is most likely nodding his head and chanting YES! YES! YES! but he is hoplessly a drone to Corizine:lmao: ) hoping the public will forget his costly fiasco's to the NJ residents. BUT MAKE IT A POINT NOT TO FORGET!!! DON'T FORGET TO VOTE OUT ALL THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVE AND LEGISLATURE WHO ASSISTED CORIZINE ON HIS COSTLY VENURE!!! NJ residents can get the message across by their powerful vote and not allowed themselves to be swayed by fancy speeches, false promises, and the hope that most residents will forget that Corizine turned off the state and cost millions of dollars, some people their jobs, and padded the bank accounts for all political cronies.

lordmarc
07-19-2006, 11:31 AM
Corzine: Ban dual pensions
Home News Tribune Online 05/15/05
By JASON METHOD
GANNETT NEW JERSEY
Democratic gubernatorial candidate U.S. Sen. Jon S. Corzine said public officials should be banned from collecting large state pensions simply because they worked several part-time jobs.

"Senator Corzine believes the state pension system has been abused, and taxpayers can't afford it anymore," spokeswoman Ivette Mendez said. "He says it's time to stop this pension-padding and double-dipping."

Corzine's comments came after Republican gubernatorial hopefuls this week called for changes to the state pension system. Several candidates, including businessman Todd Caliguire, Assemblyman Paul DiGaetano, and Morris County Freeholder John Murphy, called for an end to the practice of tacking, or using part-time jobs to enhance pensions.

The tacking practice, other pension abuses and billions of dollars in pension fund losses, were outlined in a series in the Asbury Park Press and six other Gannett New Jersey newspapers titled, "New Jersey's Pension Peril: How it will Cost you Billions."

GOP gubernatorial candidate and former Jersey City Mayor Bret Schundler called for converting the pension system to 401(k)-type accounts.

The state's pensions became an issue this year after Acting Gov. Codey said the government was billions of dollars in debt mostly because of rising healthcare and pension-benefit costs.

There were an estimated 9,500 public employees in New Jersey holding two or more jobs in 2002, according to a Gannett New Jersey review of employment data. The multiple job holders, or tackers, took home a collective $238 million in pay.

A 2004 state Treasury department audit report found that employees who boosted their final pensions by adding part-time jobs cost the state at least $6.5 million more a year in retirement benefits.



If tacking were banned, it would affect officials like Assemblyman Robert J. Smith II, D-Gloucester, who has cobbled together six part-time jobs as a municipal prosecutor. He will be paid a total of $133,592 this year in public salaries and stands to collect a $60,000 annual pension even if he works only one part-time job for the next 10 years.

Mendez said Corzine also believes the state needs to add more money to the pension system. The system has not been fully funded since 1991, and the state still owes $5.5 billion in contributions.

"Both (political) parties have shirked away from putting adequate money into the pension system as we go," Mendez said. "It's dishonest — to workers and to taxpayers — when pension obligations aren't funded. The state needs a big dose of honesty about our pension system."

Codey, also a Democrat, did not respond to a request for comment. State Treasurer John E. McCormac has been pressing to diversify the pension's multi-billion dollar portfolio by investing part of it in hedge funds and real estate. Diversification may come with higher risk but also could provide a much higher return on the state's money, McCormac said. Most of the fund is invested in stocks and bonds.

State Assembly speaker Albio Sires said in a statement that he was awaiting the results of a commission formed by Codey to study the matter.

David P. Rebovich, a political science professor at Rider University, said politicians are loath to address pension costs.

"Democrats especially, and some Republicans, count heavily on support from teachers, county and municipal workers," Rebovich said. "They want to avoid the issue. With property taxes cited as the top issue by a majority of New Jerseyans, they still want to avoid that. So they have little incentive to touch this."

There are more than 500,000 active members in the state's various pension systems and more than 200,000 retirees. The funds have $70.5 billion in assets and pay out about $4 billion a year in benefits.

Most state and local employees have to contribution about 5 percent of their salaries to the pension system. Judges contribute about 3 percent, and contributions from law enforcement officers range from 7.5 percent to 8.5 percent.

The state will make a $195 million contribution to the pension system this fiscal year, far short of the $1.4 billion it owes.

Rebovich said his most optimistic hope is that the state budget crisis and pension costs become a part of the gubernatorial and Assembly campaigns this year to signal that candidates "recognize this is an important issue" and it "stays on the public agenda."

State Sen. Leonard T. Connors Jr., R-Ocean, said he believes retirement plans for future state hires should be made to self-directed 401(k)-type accounts "until we get this back on track." 401(k) plans are mostly funded through employee contributions and do not offer healthcare benefits at retirement.

Connors said he also favors using a 10-year average of the highest pay on which to base an income, instead of the current three-year average. He also said he would not be opposed to prohibiting tacking.

State Senate Minority Leader Leonard Lance, R-Hunterdon, said he would support legislation that would increase the minimum salary necessary to qualify for a state pension from $1,500 to a "significantly higher figure."

He said he purposely paid two of his own aides a salary of $1,400 each so they wouldn't accrue credits in the pension system.

Assemblyman Peter J. Biondi, R-Somerset, said his "simple" solution to pension boosting would be to "Eliminate the availability of a state pension to part-timers."

Biondi, vice chairman of the Joint Legislative Committee on Ethical Standards, also suggested that state pension tackers be allowed to choose only one full-time job to contribute to their pensions.

"I think we can't afford to do this on the backs of taxpayers any longer," Biondi said.

Other lawmakers echoed similar thoughts.

State Sen. Barbara Buono, D-Middlesex, said she does expects opposition to changing the system.

"There're always stakeholders who feel they are at risk of losing something which is held near and dear to them," she said. "Simply because you anticipate there's going to be opposition doesn't mean you pull back from a policy position that you feel has merit to it."

Buono said the time is ripe for reform.

"The public cynicism is at such a boiling point. We really need to re-evaluate the way the entire pension and retirement system works for elected officials, it's really been abused," she said.

William G. Dressel, executive director of the New Jersey State League of Municipalities, said pension and benefits costs for local police, firefighters and municipal workers is helping to keep property taxes among the highest in the nation.

"In many cases, it's too late (for reform)," Dressel said. "The police and fire system is one of the richest that exist in the nation. The teachers system is one of the most generous. It's indicative of the powerful interest groups they represent."

Municipalities must pay a contribution for municipal workers, which affects property taxes, while more state money contributed to teacher pensions means less is available for property tax relief, Dressel said.

Lynn Maher, spokeswoman for the state's teachers union, the New Jersey Education Association, said the problems with the teachers' pension are caused by the state not fully contributing to the fund.

"The state needs to make its contribution," Maher said. "It committed to doing that, and it's the only fair and decent thing to do."

Contributing: Gannett New Jersey staff writer Peter N. Spencer and Home News Tribune staff writer Ken Tarbous

http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050515/NEWS03/505150472&SearchID=73208373662310

lordmarc
07-21-2006, 07:42 PM
[:) http://www.stopthetaxman.org/

Voice of New Jersey
07-24-2006, 12:03 PM
I cant understand why you people cry, especally lordmarc. New Jerey is a state that was in trouble and Corzine had to do something. He is fixing our problems so we the people can enjoy our lives in the greatest, I said greatest state in the country. If you cant afford to live here, THEN GET OUT, I SAID TO GET OUT!!!. Governer Corzine allready made his mark in life and decided to be our Governer. He made the big decisions to save New Jersy. I , as a New Jerset resident speak for all of New Jersey, We stand behind Governer Corzine and we will do our part in saving New Jersey from bankrupsy. Thank you Governer Corzine for making a difference and caring for the people of New Jersey. You are the best, I said you are the best!!!
Remember in November to vote Democrat. Lets finish the job and get rid of the trouble making Republicans.

I beat up Dawn Guzzo
07-24-2006, 01:03 PM
:eek: People are not CRYING, they are voicing their displeasure regarding a Governor who pitches temper tantrums and turns off the state to get his way for a 1% tax hike, NOW... this tax hike is going to fund the multiple pensions that many fat cats receive so they can continue to live high on the hog thanks to the tax paying drones like voiceofnj & ilovenj!!! NJ has been made a joke thanks to Corizine and have caused countless good people to move from NJ because of their greed. And, Corizine never fixed anything, he has continued with the same practices as all the DEMOCRATS before him, bleed the great citizens of NJ dry until they have nothing left. Lordmarc has provided factual information and has shared very good insight on the problems with Corizine and the Democrats, it seems to me, and to most who have written their opinions, that most agree with Lordmarc, and most are not crying, the only 2 people who have been critical and antagonistic on this messageboard have been ilovenj and voiceofnj, who are both pro Corizine and have the mentality of drones, technically they are kissing Corizine's ass and wish for us to do the same, but... they need to grow up.... Lordmarc provided facts, indisputable facts, but.. voiceofnj & ilovenj, they just spouted off.. akin to junionr high little boys, with nothing to back up their claims!!! I support Lordmarc, and I will not vote Democratic, the past 30 years plus the Democrats have destroyed NJ with their fat cat life style, greed, and nepatism. BRAVO, Lordmarc, you and all the others who have politely shared your views (with the exception of voiceofnj & ilovenj) I support you!!!!

JerseyDevil
07-24-2006, 02:45 PM
I have to respond to this post. This is just too funny to pass up.

New Jerey is a state that was in trouble and Corzine had to do something.

let's see - and WHO got NJ into the mess? besides NJ constantly electing incompetent governors - such as Florio and need I mention McGreevey - who is repsonsible for the spending of OUR tax money?


He is fixing our problems so we the people can enjoy our lives in the greatest, I said greatest state in the country.

I agree it's the greatest state in the country, but it sure as hel isn't the greatest state because of our inept government. If you disagree and think that the NJ government is so great - then why is NJ LOSING both population and businesses? Our politicians are destroying this state.


If you cant afford to live here, THEN GET OUT, I SAID TO GET OUT!!!.

It has nothing to do with affording to live in the state or not. It has to do with how the NJ state government SQUANDERS the hard earned money of the citizens of New Jersey and then when they need more - they just dig deeper into our pockets. We can go through a whole list of problems in NJ - such as our roads full of potholes, bridges in disrepair, maybe you have seen many of the road signs that are so faded you can't even read them, our historic sites which are closed, etc.


Governer Corzine allready made his mark in life and decided to be our Governer. He made the big decisions to save New Jersy. I , as a New Jerset resident speak for all of New Jersey, We stand behind Governer Corzine and we will do our part in saving New Jersey from bankrupsy.

Now this is where I thought was the most laughable statement of all.:lmao: Please sit down while I explain this to you - YOU are ONE citizen - you do NOT speak for all of NJ. I am a New Jerseyan and I know for damn sure by your statements that you do NOT speak for me. Corzine didn't save NJ from bankrupcy, he merely passed this years budget (all that is required for a balanced budget is that the expendatures equal the income). I'd like to know what big decisions he made to save NJ, besides the usual tax and SPEND? He supports the Hudson rail tunnel which just pushes more of our money toward NY. He supported the Giants, Jets and the Red Bull deals - all NJ teams which refuse to acknowledge - as you say - the great state of NJ as their home state, yet He GAVE them millions and millions of dollars. Why do we continue to foot the bill for these ungrateful teams? Killing the Jets deal - would have saved the state over 100 million dollars (the state of NJ is BUYING them their practice field for them), killing the red Bulls arena - would have saved us $85 million, killing the Giants deal period - would have saved us hundreds of millions of dollars - especially if we didn't FORGVE them their debt they carried with the state. Our politicians don't represent NJ - they represent NY and their cronies and special interest groups.


Thank you Governer Corzine for making a difference and caring for the people of New Jersey. You are the best, I said you are the best!!!
Remember in November to vote Democrat. Lets finish the job and get rid of the trouble making Republicans.
Now - I must say that your whole diatribe must all be satire. Surely you can't be serious here. When the hell will NJ learn that the democrats are the ones that keep digging deeper into our pockets? When will NJ wake up and see thet NJ - with supposed representatives in US Congress (Corzine having been one) gives the MOST to th federal government - but gets the least in return? It's time for a change in government - we should be fighting for smaller government, we should be demanding that our politicians work at attracting businesses and jobs to NJ - instead of bowing to NY and sending all the jobs over there and causing NJ to be merely a commuter state. Enough is enough.

As I said - YOU DO NOT SPEAK FOR ME! Out with Corzine and OUT with the democratic legislators in November (too bad we have to wait 4 years for Corzine to get kicked out). Sadly - knowing New Jerseyans - Crozine will be back just like the flu is every year. New Jersey has a serious problem and it's time to clean house.

I beat up Dawn Guzzo
07-24-2006, 03:56 PM
You don't speak for me either, as you will find out, voice of NJ, no one agrees with your infantile ramblings, democrats have caused the state of NJ millions of dollars, and have hurt NJ, in no way have they helped NJ. A change of parties is what needed to promote NJ to prosper.

lordmarc
07-24-2006, 04:56 PM
http://www.almink.com/humor/njsucks.html


NEW JERSEY STANDARD OF LIVING:
New Jersey has the highest auto insurance rates in the nation.
New Jersey has the highest property taxes in the nation.
New Jersey has the highest cigarette tax in the nation.
New Jersey has the second highest statewide housing costs in the nation: 73% above the national average!
New Jersey has the third highest cost of doing business in the nation.
New Jersey has the fourth highest health insurance costs in the nation.
New Jersey has the fifth highest amount of tax-supported debt in the nation.
New Jersey's overall cost of living is 32% above the national average. Why pay such a premium to live in New Jersey when you could live in a place that is both nice and has a reasonable cost of living?
New Jersey collects income taxes, sales taxes, property taxes, sin taxes, casino taxes, tourism taxes, and highway tolls, yet the state has massive budget problems. Where the hell is all of that money going? At least I know where it is coming from: your pockets!
New Jersey ranks first in the nation in per-pupil spending, but its students' only achieve average reading and math scores.
New Jersey is the most densely populated and overcrowded state in the nation. Hope you like standing in long lines and sitting in traffic jams.
The Jersey shore (don't say beaches) is vastly overrated. First, you have to fight your way through traffic jams and toll booths. Next, you have to pay for parking. Then you have to pay for beach tags to use a public beach! Finally, the ocean will be murky, freezing cold, or filled with jellyfish.
Atlantic City will always be a cut-rate resort compared to Las Vegas.
NEW JERSEY TRANSPORTATION:
New Jersey drivers were ranked the 3rd worst in the nation by Overdrive, a truckers' magazine. How damning of an indictment can you get?
New Jersey drivers were ranked the 3rd dumbest in the nation by the GMAC Insurance National Driver's Test--a test that measures basic knowledge about traffic laws and safety.
If the New Jersey DMV will give drivers' licenses to terrorists, it is not surprising that they will also give licenses to people who are behind-the-wheel terrorists.
You have to pay outrageous tolls to ride on many of New Jersey's highways, all of which were built at least 40 years ago. How many friggin times do these roads need to be paid for?
Whenever it snows, don't expect the roads to be clear again until the snow melts.
New Jersey is the only state that was stupid enough to lose $469 million dollars on a toll collection system! To pay for that mess, New Jersey now charges $1 a month for the "privilege" of using its E-ZPass. Send it back now and get a new E-ZPass with no monthly fee from DRBA.
New Jersey's roads were not designed by qualified transportation engineers, but by retards. Consider the following:
There are many places on New Jersey highways where you can exit, but not get back on.
There are many places on New Jersey highways where you can exit to go north on a road, but not south on that same road (or vice versa).
There are many places on New Jersey highways where you can exit to go east on a road, but not west on that same road (or vice versa).
There are many places on New Jersey highways where lanes just end without any warning.
To make a left turn, you either have to use a jughandle or make a right at the next street and go around the whole damn block.
It is more important to have a useless grass median than a left turn lane.
When navigating a traffic circle, there seems to be only one rule: there are no rules!
NEW JERSEY LAWS/CRIME:
New Jersey has the most dangerous city in America: Camden, NJ.
New Jersey's answer to its high crime rates is stricter regulations, not stricter punishments.
New Jersey cops need to concentrate less on speeding ticket quotas and more on the high crime rates.
New Jersey has now banned the use of handheld cell phones while driving. However, reckless driving without a cell phone will never be discouraged.
New Jersey has strict gun ownership laws. Not surprisingly, most of the guns are owned and used by criminals.
You are not allowed to pump your own gas because New Jersey's government deems a gas pump to be too dangerous for its citizens to operate. However, it takes three times as long for a "trained" minimum-wage attendant to pump your gas than if you had pumped it yourself.
You are also considered a criminal if you set off a firecracker (even a sparkler!) or throw a soda can in the wrong trash bin.
You can't buy beer in a convenience store, yet New Jersey does nothing about its residents who drive even worse than drunk drivers!
NEW JERSEY POLITICS:
Every year, New Jersey's stupid voters keep electing the same crooked, tax-and-spend politicians to that big incestuous bed of state government corruption.
New Jersey owns the distinction of having the first gay governor, Jim McGreasy. But unfortunately, New Jersey also owns the distinction of having the first corrupt gay governor. And need I remind everyone that the stupid New Jersey voters elected this sleazebag in a 15-point landslide?
New Jersey residents receive less federal funding per dollar of federal taxes paid than any other state. So not only are New Jersey's politicians crooked, but they are also ineffective.
The New Jersey Supreme Court is the most activist state court in the nation (well, maybe after Massachusetts!) For example, the court allowed Frank Lautenberg to replace Robert Torricelli as a senate nominee in 2002, even though state law clearly says that a party can replace a statewide nominee on the ballot only if the person drops out at least 51 days before the election. (Now the next time I have jury duty, I guess I can totally ignore the law and rule however I wish.)
Of course, New Jersey further embarrasses itself when its stupid voters play right along and elect that old fossil Lautenberg to replace bribetaking Senator Torricelli.
NEW JERSEY ENVIRONMENT:
New Jersey has the most toxic waste sites in the nation.
New Jersey has the second worst air quality in the nation.
New Jersey is "The Garden State" all right--complete with mosquitoes, gnats, fleas, ticks, biting flies, and chiggers.
New Jersey is a dreary state that sorely lacks natural beauty, that is, unless you have a thing for pine trees, garbage dumps, sound walls, or urban sprawl.
NEW JERSEY APOLOGISTS:
When asked why they like New Jersey, many New Jersey apologists will answer, "I like the change of seasons." NEWS FLASH: Almost all of the states experience a change of seasons, you morons!
New Jersey apologists like to boast of their close proximity to many cultural and recreational opportunities. NEWS FLASH: Location is hardly a benefit that is exclusive to New Jersey residents. There are many other places in this country with plenty of things to do. Leave the New Jersey cocoon periodically and see for yourself.
New Jersey apologists like to say, "Don't knock New Jersey until you've lived here." Well, I guess that would make it even easier!
New Jersey apologists like to say, "If you don't like New Jersey, then leave." Well, if such people like me are leaving New Jersey, then why are things getting worse?
New Jersey apologists like to boast that New Jersey is the home state of Bruce Springsteen and Jon Bon Jovi. However, these two has-beens are so washed up that they couldn't even rock the vote!

lordmarc
07-24-2006, 05:01 PM
Its time For Furor Corzine to tax the criminals, then again, its asking him to tax his own Assembly with the Multiple Pensions. I really feel good paying more so he can continue the Multiple Pension Payouts.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6555449

Camden, N.J., named most-dangerous city
Detroit relinquishes title just days after NBA melee
TRENTON, N.J. - Camden has been named the nation’s most-dangerous city, snatching the top spot from Detroit, according to a company’s annual ranking based on crime statistics.

Officials in Camden, which was ranked third last year, downplayed the dubious designation Sunday, saying many steps have already been taken to reduce crime in the city.

“We must give our people jobs, training and opportunity,” said City Councilman Ali Sloan-El, ( Who gets a multiple pension) who pointed out that Camden’s poverty is an important contributing factor to its high crime rate.

lordmarc
07-24-2006, 05:38 PM
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=14628592&BRD=1697&PAG=461&dept_id=44551&rfi=6

http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051110/NEWS03/511100356/1041

http://www.nysun.com/article/18124

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1456848/posts

JerseyDevil
07-24-2006, 06:16 PM
lordmarc - i do disagree with a lot of your listings. I agree about corzine and stuff - but I have been to forty states and lived in 6 of them and NJ is by far the best in terms of things to do and beaches.

there are so many stereotypical things in that list - it's not even funny. Look at pollution - where is NJ located? It's EAST - east of Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Indiana and Kentucky - the states that have the most coal plants. Now where does their pollution go? Does it stay over those states? hell no - it follows the frigging jet stream - right into NJ. 1/3 of NJ's pollution is cuased by out of state and a 1/3 of car pollution is from out of state drivers. NJ has the toughest water standards in the country - California - it's swim as your own risk. Another - take auto insurance - yeah - NJ has the highest, but if you look at EASTERN/SOUTHERN NY state - they're insurance is only a couple of dollars cheaper - as is massachuesetts. The whole northeast has high auto insurance rates - it comes with having 25% of the US population linving here with high traffic volumes. The only reason PA and NY are cheaper is because they are big states with a lot of uninhabited areas in their western sections.

You have to look further than just the mere numbers. It's great saying that NJ has the "most" toxic waste sites in the country. Several years ago I was interested in studying this "fact" a little deeper, and while we may have the most - ours were actually SMALLER insize and had less pollution than most other states.

That list is most a bunch of stereootypical nonsense. BTW - the one thing that really pisses me off about this list is the comment about the lack of natural beauty. It had to obviously be complied by a New Yorker. I like how it ony mentions the pine barrens - which are quite beautiful, but then there is also the Delaware Water gap, the mountains of the northwest and the scenic and PROTECTED beauty of the Jersey Shore.

Hopefully this will be my finally edit and addition here - but concerning beach tags - do you realize that most beaches in other states are NOT life guard protected? That they do NOT clean them? And who do you expect to have pay for the upkeep of the NJ beaches? soley NJ taxpayers - or the millions of out of staters - mostly made up of New Yorkers and Pennsylvanians - many of who leave their trash on the beach? Well personally - I think the people who use the beach should pay for the upkeep. I would institute a three teir price level though - people sho live in the community - get the beach for free, New Jerseyan pay a certain amount and then non-New Jerseyans pay ful cost. :)

lordmarc
07-24-2006, 07:44 PM
I did not write that, I posted the weblink. I'm just angry because thanks to Corzine, N.J. is no longer a long term answer for living here. I know I'm right because I do Refinances for a living and I know for a fact that at least 75% people's salaries ( Usually 2 incomes) goes to repay their loan and taxes. Corzine only made it harder and Corzine offers nothing, ( for the voice of NJ) I SAID NOTHING!! for his increases. How does quality of life go up in N.J., thanks to Corzine? If Corzine wants to help, he would resign and go tax corn growers in Nebraska. I'm sure soon he will tax people who have a fire hydrant on their street. Why not a gravity tax? We are all using N.J. gravity and he should tax it. If their was a way he could turn it off like a utility, he would of enforced one by now. Well at least we have the comfort knowing Multiple Pensions will continue to be paid out.

JerseyDevil
07-24-2006, 09:22 PM
Lordmarc - I know you didn't write it. I'm just saying that a lot of it is just stereotypical nonsense in there. I want to make that clear to people since this is a tourism website, although really the political discussions are what gets people going. I seriously do hope that you do not believe all the things written in there either.

I moved back to NJ because of my love for the state. Me starting up this website and trying to develop this into a viabl business - was because of my love for NJ. Believe me though - after being back here and able to see the politics - I do NOT love the NJ government. It has to change - but that will only take New Jerseyans who are fed up enough to make LASTING change. As I said - I feel too many New Jerseyans vote on feel good national issues - and not on what will make NJ a better state. I know I sound like a broken record with this - but it is a valid example - I am completely shocked that so many New Jerseyans don't care that we have teams who do not acknowledge our state as their home. If it was any other state - there would be huge outcries. But then again - all the states I have been to have something NJ sorely lacks - and that is a sense of self pride. This carries over to the government. No one cares that politicians support things that benefit NY more than NJ (and to a lesser extent Philadelphia over NJ). As I said - instead of building up our cities, and attracting businesses, our politicians are too busy planning on how to get the Hudson tunnel built so NY can get the businesses and build up their tax base. We have to start expecting our politicians to fight for us. We have to start saying that NJ is #1. People have to stop voting for people based on national moods.

lordmarc
07-26-2006, 12:46 AM
How do you stop a Democrat from robbing your house?
put up a help-wanted sign.

Why do Democrats re-fry their beans?
Have you seen a Democrat do anything right the first time?

Why are Democrats so short?
When they're young, their parents say, "When you get bigger you have to get a good job."


How many Democrats does it take to screw in a light bulb?
Doesn't matter, they're to short to reach the socket.

JerseyDevil
07-28-2006, 12:06 AM
Lordmarc - I do like your jokes - although I should be impartial here. :) Everyone has their political leanings and I seriously don't think the democrats are good at all for the state of NJ or for the country for that matter. I had initially felt I would try to stay out of the political discussions, but I am way too much of a political/news junkie for that.

lordmarc
07-28-2006, 12:28 PM
:mad: In November, I will vote 100% Republican. Al N.J. Democrats do is raise taxes and endorse multiple pensions. How does N.J. win with Corzine? He raised my taxes, but my quality of life has not increased. I have to switch to Vonage to save money, boycott all union stores so I can save money at Wal-Marts. the Democrats held NJ hostage until Corzine's multipension tax increases came in effect. If Corzine wants to help N.J., he would resign as Governor and leave. He lied to obtain the position. He could of easily fixed NJ problems. STOP PAYING MULTIPLE PENSIONS!!!!!!:mad:

lordmarc
07-28-2006, 12:30 PM
How do you delete duplicate posts?

JerseyDevil
07-28-2006, 12:45 PM
How do you delete duplicate posts?
I or an admin has to delete them. Which I will do for you. Don't worry about the double post. :)

lordmarc
08-02-2006, 11:21 AM
He never talks about cutting the MULTIPLE PENSIONS OF THE N.J. ASSEMBLY. He wants to attack just the basic State Workers

http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060802/NEWS/608020432/1001

lordmarc
08-02-2006, 12:46 PM
How much is Pennsylvania paying Corzine to have people move out of N.J.? Corzine is nothing but a terrorist against the people of N.J.


http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060802/OPINION01/608020438/1079

lordmarc
08-03-2006, 10:30 AM
:evil2: :mad: Make Corzine the Governor of Texas and let him do to Texas what he is doing to N.J. and not only will the Mexicans not cross the borders, The Mexican Police will be working double time keeping all the Texan's from illegally crossing their borders for a cheaper life style. N.J. is now minus about 58,000 people so far. Its hard to work and want to pay taxes for Corzine's multiple pension program for only his people. Good Work Fidel Corzine.

http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060803/NEWS/608030421/1001

lordmarc
08-05-2006, 03:13 PM
This is cute, but we all know this really happened behind closed doors. This would be accurate if the multiple pensions were mentioned.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmxvawvXB44

lordmarc
08-14-2006, 02:13 PM
http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060814/NEWS03/608140383/1041

JerseyDevil
08-14-2006, 05:17 PM
Lordmarc - can you do me a favor and post the article along with the link. Alos, please include some commentary. :) I don't want this to be a thread with just a bunch of links going to the Home News - there has to be some discussion. Also when the Home News takes the articles down, no one will know what was being pointed to or what you were trying to get at.

Marianita
08-14-2006, 08:04 PM
Hi lordmarc, Ofcourse Corzine and his buddies are not going to give up their pensions or even part of them. It is grossly unfair that they can collect them for years whether they work or not. I am anxious to see how the property taxes go. You know that only a portion of the sales tax increase goes to lowering property taxes. And there is alot of property in New Jersey. I look for Corzine to make his exit one of these days leaving the huge deficit behind and the property taxes the same as they are now. Marianita:mad:

lordmarc
08-15-2006, 01:48 AM
Will lawmakers cut funds for their own pensions?
Home News Tribune Online 08/14/06
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON — As New Jersey lawmakers move to slice the state's highest-in-the-nation property taxes, many wonder whether legislators will put their own publicly funded pensions under the knife to help cut taxes.



Skepticism at the Statehouse is high given that 50 legislators — accounting for about 42 percent of the Legislature — work more than one public job.

Those 50 lawmakers represent about 42 percent of the Legislature.

They include 12 of 40 senators and 38 of 80 Assembly members, statistics that recently prompted the Center for Public Integrity in Washington, D.C., to rank New Jersey as worst in the nation for politicians who hold more than one public job.

The special legislative committee charged with devising public worker benefits and pension reform recommendations to save taxpayers money is led by two legislators who also hold municipal jobs.

Sen. Nicholas Scutari, D-Union, earned about $54,604 last year as Linden's prosecutor, while Assemblywoman Nellie Pou, D-Passaic, earned $35,260 in 2005 as Paterson's assistant business administrator. They each also make $49,000 per year as state legislators.

When the committee held its first meeting Wednesday, neither Scutari nor Pou mentioned reforming pensions for elected officials, nor restricting pensions to one public job, when they read opening statements and questioned the state Treasury Department's top pension official.

After the hearing, each said those issues will probably be discussed.

"We're going to look at everything," said Scutari, a legislator for about two years who has worked for Linden for about 11 years.

Pou, a legislator for about nine year who has worked for Paterson for about 13 years, said the panel will start "with a clean slate."

"I honestly believe everything is on the table," Pou said. "I know you've heard that before, but in this case they've never been truer words."

According to financial disclosure reports filed this spring by state legislators, 49 earned income from more than one government job last year.

Since last year, Hunterdon County Freeholder Marcia Karrow joined the Assembly and Sen. Joseph Vitale became interim Woodbridge mayor, while Sen. Sharpe James, D-Essex, left office as Newark mayor on July 1.

Two legislators opposed to lawmakers holding more than one office resigned other elected seats when elected to the Legislature last year.

Assemblywoman Amy Handlin, R-Monmouth, resigned as a county freeholder, and Assemblywoman Jennifer Beck, R-Monmouth, resigned from the Red Bank council.

Through multiple government jobs, state legislators — and anyone else for that matter — boost pensions they will one day receive. Legislators cannot receive state pensions until they're retired and age 60.

Assemblyman Kevin O'Toole, R-Bergen, a member of the special benefits reform committee, said he supports basing pensions on one job and barring elected officials from getting pensions. He wants the committee to recommend such reforms.

"We too as legislators have to sacrifice, and we have to lead before we ask others to follow," O'Toole said.

In 38 states, holding more than one elected office is illegal, but New Jersey has 21 legislators who hold more than one elected post.

New Jersey Policy Perspective, which has released several influential policy reports, has for years lobbied to ban dual office-holding.

"Anyone who holds two offices is stopping someone else from holding one," NJPP President Jon Shure said. "If we care about participatory democracy, that's unacceptable."

Holding two elected offices is a felony in Indiana that carries a prison sentence of up to three years in prison.

JerseyDevil
08-15-2006, 01:25 PM
In 38 states, holding more than one elected office is illegal, but New Jersey has 21 legislators who hold more than one elected post.

New Jersey Policy Perspective, which has released several influential policy reports, has for years lobbied to ban dual office-holding.

"Anyone who holds two offices is stopping someone else from holding one," NJPP President Jon Shure said. "If we care about participatory democracy, that's unacceptable."

Holding two elected offices is a felony in Indiana that carries a prison sentence of up to three years in prison.
I was completely shocked when I found out that NJ allows people to hold more than one elected office. I found this out when I heard that Sharpe James not only mayor of Newark, but also in the state legislature. I think this is completely wrong. People were NOT supposed to be career politicians, they're supposed to be "normal" people who wish to support their communities. This is one of the problems with NJ - we have too many damn career politicians, who don't care anything about the citizens they represent, but only their political careers.

Yeah, people do vote people into office, but it's much harder to run against an incumbent. It's also much harder to keep track of what our politicians are doing in NJ. How many times does the Mayor of Newark, Trenton, Jersey City, etc, get on the evening news - which is controlled by NY and Philadelphia? How many times is the state legislature covered by these media outlets. Now that I have lived here again - I see that the majority of the problems come from the political environment of NJ and the absence of tv networks which cover OUR evening news, not some foreign state's.

lordmarc
08-15-2006, 04:47 PM
Tax hikes in N.J. rank tops in U.S.
Home News Tribune Online 08/15/06
By GREGORY J. VOLPE
GANNETT STATE BUREAU
gvolpe@app.com
TRENTON — New Jersey raised taxes more this year than any other state in the nation, according to a preliminary report released yesterday by the National Conference of State Legislatures.



Among 44 states that provided tax information to the nonpartisan research group for state legislatures, New Jersey was one of three that hiked taxes by more than 1 percent and the only one to increase them by more than 5 percent.

While New Jersey may be surpassed by Alaska as the tax-happiest state when the final report is released later this year, it was often cited in the report for tax hikes and stood in contrast to most of its peers that have surpluses and can cut taxes or raise funding to programs like education, health care or road projects.

"New Jersey has faced fiscal challenges at this point in time when other states aren't facing the same level of difficulty," said Corina Eckl, fiscal affairs director for the conference, who co-authored the new report.

New Jersey, stymied for more than five years by recurring deficits, was frequently cited in the report for cutting popular programs or raising taxes when other states saw a 25 percent cumulative increase in their year-end balances from fiscal 2005 to 2006.

In one section, New Jersey was cited along with Texas for decreasing higher-education funding. New Jersey topped that list with a 2.5 percent cut, when nationwide higher-education funding increased by 6.3 percent.

George Pruitt, chairman of the New Jersey Presidents' Council and president of Thomas Edison State College, said New Jersey's cuts mean higher costs and less access to higher education in New Jersey. Plus, he said, reduced funding will mean less research, leaving New Jersey at an economic disadvantage to other states.

"The public invests in public education because it's a public good, not an institutional good," Pruitt said. "The fact that New Jersey is disinvesting in higher education when the rest of the country is investing in higher education does not bode well for the future of the state if this trend continues."

Among the report's other findings:


New Jersey is one of four states slated to cut funding for corrections, but the 0.1 percent decrease is reflective of how many New Jersey departments are operating on flat or reduced budgets.

New Jersey was one of two states to raise its corporation and business tax by imposing a new surtax to raise $121 million; businesses are being allowed to take a long-deferred deduction, however, reducing the state's collections overall.

Among three states that raised cigarette taxes, New Jersey had the smallest increase at 17.5 cents per pack, compared to $1 and 60-cent hikes in Texas and Vermont, respectively.
The conference needed more information about New Jersey's Medicaid funding before including it in the study. Nationally, this funding increased by 6.3 percent. Treasury Department spokesman Mark Perkiss said New Jersey's funding will raise slightly from about $3.2 million to $3.5 million.

Gregory J. Volpe:

gvolpe@gannett.com

lordmarc
10-02-2006, 11:03 AM
Corzine's everything but gravity tax took place yesterday. Now he is backing Menendez. Why do N.J. love Democrats? Menendez is in the lead. Wake up N.J., why support Corzine? Its time to fight Osama Bin Corzine and get his man Menendez out. We in N.J. now have a parking meter tax, and we continue to support Democrats? If it did not rain so much in N.J., I bet we would have a Solar tax. Remember, we are paying for their multiple pensions. If Menendez wins, then N.J. needs to get more taxes. When your homes go into Foreclosure, because it cant sell, like the millions that are on the market, (Try to drive down a street without a house for sale). Maybe then a wake up call will come. Don't pay your voted in taxes and your house is history. Then the Democrats will thank you by putting a surge charge on your back taxes. Then again, lets vote Menendez in, Lets give him another pension. Why not, he only has about 4. Corzine should raise more taxes so he can have 5.

JerseyDevil
10-02-2006, 11:54 AM
Lordmarc - You know why New Jerseyans continue to vote democrat even though nothing has gottne better?

1) people vote down party lines generally and even though NJ is almost evenly split it is starting to lean more heavily toward democrats.
2) We have no broadcast media to keep an eye on our politicians like Pennsylvania and NY has. Eyewitness news hardly carries any NJ news, unless it's a shooting in Newark or some scandal like McGreevey.

It's interesting to note that there was a poll recently done abotu whether people were upset by the new taxes and the majority said they weren't. Some of the comments made by people who were interviewed stated that it was needed to combat the budget deficit. Well the reason we have a budget deficit is because businesses are leaving, the poiiticians are making NJ into more and more of a commuter state where are residents work OUT of state instead of working in state and providing more tax revenue, not to mention that Corzine INCREASED the budget by over a BILLION dollars. They concern themselves with funding of stem cell research instead of working to make NJ a better place to live. I have nothing against stem cell research, I have a problem with the government funding it though. We give millions of dollars to sports teams that do not promote the state, but instead promote NY. Yet no one is outraged, there are no demonstrations that I know of going on in Trenton. There is a mass exidus of people though LEAVING the state however and voting with their feet. The only reason NJ is keeping it's population stable is because of immigrants. While the middle class tax base leaves the state, the less wealthy immigrant tax base moves in. NJ is anti-business and anti-middle class.

On NJN they had people representing various municipalities addressing the legislature. One made a very good point. The retiries are having to sell their homes because they can't live under the tax burden, so the people who move in are young and have kids. This increases the need for more schools, etc, which then increases the need for more property taxes. We are losing the balance that makes a state vibrant.

We need to stop building sprawl communities, where we need more roads, schools, etc. We need to be build and start revitalizing our cities (and not as bedroom communities either, but as economic powerhouses with their own corporations and businesses). The politicians seem to be blind though and only want to make as much money as they can on the backs of the New Jersey citizen. Our politicians are more concerned with paying millions out to the Giants, Jets and red Bulls, not to mention building that ridiculous rail tunnel into NY. We wouldn't need that if they worked on attracting businesses to NJ. Do you see all the building going on in Manhattan? That is all office space that will mostly house New JERSEY citizens! Those office buildings could be in New Jersey if our politicians got off their asses and actually did something!

Marianita
10-02-2006, 06:19 PM
Hi lordmarc, So now there is a meter tax? I tell ya, Corzine sure is good at taxing things. He is a very poor manager, moves money around and spends . All this at tax payers expence. He really needs to be voted out. I think the republicans could do better. Hopefully he will not get reelected nor Menendez. We will see. How much longer until the voting is done? Is it November? Nothing much has been accomplished thus far with Corzine except to tax our state more, whatever he can come up with. Marianita

JerseyDevil
10-02-2006, 09:04 PM
Corzine is in for another 3 years, unless some major scandal hits like McGreevey. But then of course we'll suffer through ANOTHER year with a "Acting" Governor and that would be again Richard Codey as of right now.

lordmarc
10-03-2006, 11:07 PM
Taxes driving people out of Jersey
Star Ledger ^ | 07.30.06 | KARIN PRICE MUELLER


Posted on 09/25/2006 9:37:25 PM PDT by Coleus


Some see it as an exodus. Others call it a mass migration. But it's really a financial flight. In interviews with dozens of New Jersey residents, financial advisers and estate planning attorneys, one thing becomes apparent: People are being taxed out of New Jersey. "I've always felt there's a level of taxation where people say, 'Enough is enough,'" said Curtis Dubay, an economist with the Tax Foundation, a Washington, D.C., nonpartisan tax research group. "If any state has pushed the line, it's New Jersey."

According to the foundation's 2006 State Business Tax Climate Index, New Jersey has the third highest tax load in the nation. For 2007, it's probably going to be worse, Dubay said. "I have little doubt that New Jersey will be the worst ranked state with regard to taxes," he said.

There's no question people are leaving. And, they have been for some time. Internal Revenue Service data shows each of New Jersey's 21 counties suffered a net population loss in 2004, the most recent year data is available. In that year, nearly 100,000 households left the state, taking with them $1 billion in personal income. They're leaving for more tax-friendly states such as Florida, Nevada and Delaware, IRS data shows. Here are the stories of five families of different financial means who have either left, or might leave, New Jersey:

THE COST OF LIVING

Former Princeton residents Don and Dawna Gallo call Golden, Colo., their home. "We loved New Jersey and we had no intention of leaving," said Dan Gallo, 45. "We wanted to stay and retire in the state, but when we looked at the costs of remaining in New Jersey, leaving was economically the right thing to do." The Gallos say taxes -- of all kinds -- were a huge reason for their move.

Marianita
10-03-2006, 11:29 PM
Hi lordmarc, That article in the Star Ledger tells it like it is. How can people go on paying those high taxes? They would have to be rich. It is ridiculous. Ofcourse the state will lose out with all these people leaving. As you recall Corzine promised to lower the taxes which ofcourse he has not done. There will continue to be an exodus until something is done. The elderly suffer too and are forced to get apartments. It will be interesting to get an update from the IRS as regards a current exodus from New Jersey. It is a shame but people are forced to make the move. Marianita

Marianita
10-03-2006, 11:38 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, We have 3 more years to put up with Corzine? That is a long time and alot can happen. So far he has not accomplished much and within 3 yrs more people will leave New Jersey because of the taxes. I wonder what he will find to tax next. He seems to be pretty good at it. Marianita

lynnou812
10-14-2006, 12:14 AM
I am so sick of these outrageous taxes in New Jersey...the scary part is that less then intelligent people keep voting for criminals who increase our taxes even after making promises that they will not raise taxes. Corzine needs to go and Kean must beat Menendez to send a message that the people of New Jersey are intelligent folks and won't stand being lied to anymore.

I am shocked an impeachment has not been sought against the Taxman.....like that of Florio....does anyone remember "Florio free in 93???"

I am ready to sign the petition to impeach....just need others who share the same concerns about New Jersey to sign on.

lynnou812
10-14-2006, 12:17 AM
Sorry everyone....I am from NJ(down the shore) but the original post calls me a tourist.

Marianita
10-14-2006, 05:20 PM
Hi lynnou812, That is okay that you are down as tourist. I am posted as a New Jersian and I am not from there but wish I were. I actually go there every year as it is my second home. But my heart is there. My new grandson is a genuine New Jersey citizen though. He was born on Sept 22 at Virtual Memorial Hosp in Mount Holly. My son lives in Marlton. Corzine needs to be removed. It probably takes alot of signatures though. He should be in the ''Guiness book of records'' for having thought up the most things to tax. He even came up with the bright idea of people pumping their own gas and got thousands of emails so had to disregard that idea. lol. The taxes are ridiculous in New Jersey. I read of a mass exodus that took place in 2004. The IRS said that 10,000 people left NJ because off the taxes. I believe I read it in New Jersey Monthly. The IRS does not have a current update but can you imagine anything so awful? People leave and it takes money from the state. There is no reason for the taxes to be so high and Corzine also likes to spend money as he chooses. If Menendez gets elected it will only make the tax situation worse. I know that Corzine can be removed as it happened here to a governor we had several yrs ago. Corzine has a way of moving money around and spending and does not know what to do about the tax situation. He is not very popular but he is still in office and for a long time yet if nothing is done. Marianita

JerseyDevil
10-14-2006, 05:25 PM
Just to let you know, in the FAQ it explains why some people have tourist and others say New Jerseyan, etc under their name... Why does it say "Tourist" under my name? (http://forum.aboutnewjersey.com/faq.php?faq=vb_user_maintain#faq_user_title)

lynnou812
10-14-2006, 09:51 PM
I was geared up last night and did not read that part too carefully. I saw from your post you are in Toms River.....I am in Lacey Twp.....so we are neighbors. I am so glad to have found others that are none to pleased with Corzine.

I will be out November 7th to vote for Kean....as well as everyone I know. We can only hope that the good people of this state do the same.

JerseyDevil
10-16-2006, 09:48 PM
lynnou812 - no problem. A lot of people who are new to the board mention the "tourist" under their name.

Coming soon to town near you - NEW TAXES!

Corzine has a new "bait and switch" plan up his sleave to combat property taxes. He's proposing allowing towns to issue their own sales tax to help them lower property taxes. So now instead of paying through what is called "property tax", people will just have to pay the same amount of money in what is called a "sales tax". Of course this will enable polticians to say - "see we lower propety taxes... nevermind that we raised all your other taxes." :roll: Of course people visiting the town will have to pay the tax too - but the majority paying it will be the residents. There is one thing about taxes, once the government takes your money, it is very very hard for you to get it back. There is always some pet project that they want done. I seriously doubt many of the towns that institute a sales tax would actually have it go toward reducing property taxes. Let's all remember, while the 7% sales tax increase was SUPPOSEDLY needed to balance the budget, Corzine INCREASED the budget by over a BILLION dollars!

lordmarc
10-23-2006, 08:44 PM
Let's reduce govt. costs instead of taxing more


Home News Tribune Online 10/23/06

Gov. Jon S. Corzine has expressed his support to allow local governments to impose their own sales tax as a means of increasing revenue to offset rising property taxes. This idea should be buried before it gets off the ground. All that would do is create another source of taxation. What N.J. taxpayers need are fewer taxes and more efficiency in government at all levels.


The mess we are in today did not happen overnight. It is a result of many years of poor decisions by both parties in Trenton. To name a few, the pension crisis was caused by allowing local governments to skip their payments over many years, multiple layers of governmental entities resulting in more than 500 municipalities and 600 school districts, not to mention special districts and independent authorities. In other words, there is a lot of duplication out there.

So instead of looking to increase revenues, how about giving first priority to reducing the cost of government by eliminating the duplication and by putting a stop to those people who abuse the system by padding their pensions and by making eleventh-hour "Christmas tree"' appropriations to their favorite causes.

There is much to be done and some tough decisions must be made. Adding new taxes is not part of the solution.

Charles C. Haus

SOUTH PLAINFIELD

http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2006610230410

lordmarc
11-15-2006, 04:47 PM
Well N.J., You wanted Menendez. That only endorsed Corzine's taxes. You got what you voted for. You will have to pay a toll , starting on Route 78. I laugh at all the people that vote Democrat in N.J. I know your Union makes you vote Democrat, but its the skilled white collar worker on the top of the Union Totem Poll that makes the money in N.J. You keep voting Democrat, They keep making the money that you spend, and get multiple pensions. You get to pay the taxes and tolls. Go Democrats!!!!!

http://www.news12.com/NJ/topstories/article?id=185215#"

" When Hell Freezes Over" " When Pigs Fly" " When N.J. Gets a Freeway"
Same Metaphor

Marianita
11-15-2006, 10:55 PM
Hi lordmarc, I say. It is most unfortunate that Menendez won. It was a close race indeed and I could not sleep on election night. I kept going to the computer. Well, I am not surprised that Menendez won as I had a feeling he would. But he and Corzine will together will be disaster for New Jersey when the taxes go up and Corzine finds more things to tax. I had truly hoped that Kean would win the election but it was all about money, Menendez had plenty of money,I believe 5 million dollars on hand and Kean only had half of that. It is too bad when it is all about money but that's politics. So we need to see what effect this election has on the state of New Jersey. I do not see how it can be any good. Marianita

lordmarc
11-16-2006, 11:04 AM
Is one of the hundred proposals to eliminate MULTIPLE PENSIONS FOR ALL STATE EMPLOYEES? Corzine needs to do N.J. a favor and follow Mcgreevy's example and resign.

Marianita
11-16-2006, 10:26 PM
Well, Lordmarc, I think not. Corzine is making money and it is doubtful that he will resign. He would have to be ousted. I am not sure why the people New Jersey keep him because he has proven that he does not know how to manage the budget deficit and has taxed everything he can think of. He has it made with the promise of a lifetime pension plus what is no doubt a large salary. Now he has Menendez to help him. It seemed that McGreevy did better. Marianita

lordmarc
11-17-2006, 11:28 AM
Unions supports Democrats, Democrats support raising and inventing taxes. Why does Democrats make it hard for me to afford to support Unions? They have to get Multiple Pensions.
Im 100% Wal-Marts, B'J.'s and Wegmans. If that angers Unions, Then thank your Democratic Goverment.

Marianita
11-17-2006, 12:03 PM
Hi lordmarc, Raising taxes will only cause a mass exodus from New Jersey. There is a limit as to how much people can be taxed. I read on NJ.com that there will be a 20% reduction in property taxes in New Jersey. I hope this helps but with Corzine thinking of new things to tax it may not make a significant difference. It is expensive living in New Jersey as it is. I am just thankful that my son has been successful there. It will be expensive for me when I get ready to move there. As long as we have people like Corzine ands Menendez we will be taxed for everything they can think of. There will be more to come. Marianita

MITHRANDIR
11-22-2006, 05:36 AM
Hi lordmarc, Raising taxes will only cause a mass exodus from New Jersey. There is a limit as to how much people can be taxed. I read on NJ.com that there will be a 20% reduction in property taxes in New Jersey. I hope this helps but with Corzine thinking of new things to tax it may not make a significant difference. It is expensive living in New Jersey as it is. I am just thankful that my son has been successful there. It will be expensive for me when I get ready to move there. As long as we have people like Corzine ands Menendez we will be taxed for everything they can think of. There will be more to come. Marianita

High taxes are only part of the problem.

High gov't spending (especially on things not needed for the public good {people can easily get into debates about what is the public good ;)}) is the other part of the problem. Gov't needs to live within its means and spend wisely the money that it does have available.

lordmarc
11-29-2006, 07:02 PM
State Unions are rallying about benefit cuts? I'm confused, they put the Democrats in power. I have seen " Firemen for Menendez" signs everywhere. Now that they have made their Democratic bed, they are rallying and saying " We'll remember in November" ? Talk about Hypocrites. Unions want Democrats, Union vote Democrats, Democrats now win and they are feeling betrayed? Remember what in November? Corzine raised every tax in creation and kept Multiple Pensions in effect for State Politicians. How did they remember this November? They voted in Corzine's buddy Menendez as Senator, fully endorsing Corzine. I'm happy that unions that support Democrats now feel the pinch of their decisions. You made your bed, now lay in it.

Unions Support Democrats, Democrats raise taxes, That means millions of people in N.J. cant support Unions. We have to shop at Wal-Mart. If that is the Union Plan, its working. Keep voting Democrat, Oh yeah, We'll remember in November.

lordmarc
11-30-2006, 12:01 PM
Dual positions will end
Edison to adopt ethics reform
Home News Tribune Online 11/30/06
By GINA VERGEL
STAFF WRITER
gvergel@thnt.com

EDISON — While state lawmakers toy with the idea of putting an end to dual-office holding, township officials yesterday announced plans to enact a law banning municipal employees from moonlighting and holding multiple positions.



Mayor Jun H. Choi said he would adopt the law and other ethics standards through executive order in the near future, joining Woodbridge as the only municipality in the county to forbid employees from taking jobs that would pose a conflict of interest.

"This is innovative stuff," Choi said. "You don't have that many models around."

Choi said the law, which would not pertain to off-duty police officers who choose to work part time, would also prohibit a municipal employee from taking a private job with a contractor working for the municipality.

The new standards would include a code of ethics that will apply to every full-time municipal employee in the executive and judiciary branches of township government. The measure would limit multiple-position holding and moonlighting, require employees to disclose outside employment and business interests, restrict conflicts of interest, establish post-employment restrictions and designate an Ethics Liaison Officer for the township. That officer, said Choi, will be named shortly.

"What it regulates is transparency," Choi said. "We're reviewing the details, but it is aimed at minimizing conflicts of interest and will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. We'll develop a review process to make sure it's a fair standard."

Employees will be subject to mandatory ethics training, the mayor said.

A seven-point executive order signed in September by then-interim Mayor of Woodbridge Joseph Vitale bans municipal employees from engaging in conflicts of interest; using their jobs to provide special benefits to themselves, family members and friends; and accepting money for their jobs aside from their paychecks.

In neighboring Highland Park, Borough Council officials are considering becoming the first municipality in the state to ban dual-office holding for elected positions.

That ordinance, introduced last month, would prohibit Highland Park elected officials from holding another elected office, whether at the county, state or federal level.

New Jersey has more state legislators holding two offices than any other state in the country, according to the Center for Public Integrity. The most common second office is at the municipal level.

Choi also signed a bill yesterday that encourages citizens to get involved in town government. Joined by members of Citizens' Campaign, which he called "advocates of open, honest and clean government," Choi signed the Open Appointments Ordinance, a law unanimously approved by the Township Council in October.

The law was recommended to the council by a Citizens' Campaign graduate intern and Edison resident, Ashley Burke.

Sponsored by Councilman Peter Barnes III and Councilman Tony Massaro, the ordinance will create a public directory of all nonsalary, appointed positions and establish an open application process for citizens seeking such positions. The directory and other information will be kept in the township clerk's office.

"This ordinance promotes openness in government and provides every citizen an opportunity to play a part in shaping public policy in Edison," said Burke, 23.

The Metuchen-based organization's founder, Harry Pozycki, said the directory will hold information about positions available on about 25 boards and commissions.

"Many residents think of government as having to run for mayor or the council. They don't realize there are hundreds of positions in the town they can hold, only needing to devote an hour or two per week," Pozycki said. "This is a way for the township to tap into one of its best resources — educated citizens."

Councilwoman Joan Kapitan, who attended the press conference along with Councilman Charles Tomaro, said the township, and its residents, had much to be proud of in adopting the ethics reforms.

"Congratulations to us," Kapitan said.

http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061130/NEWS/611300448/1001

lordmarc
12-02-2006, 01:18 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fqCS7Y_kME

lordmarc
12-04-2006, 01:40 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1p2Zt3JhG8

lordmarc
12-11-2006, 01:18 PM
http://www.news12.com/NJ/topstories/article?id=186667

If I was at the Rally, I would of made a statement to have the Legislature give up one of their many pensions. A Vote Menendez is a vote to endorce Corzine. You all should of seen this coming. They had no problem closing NJ down, they will have no problem cutting your pensions and giving them selves a raise. You should of voted for Ton Kean Jr. That would of sent a stronger message to the Democrats that ruin NJ and your futures. Your rally only gave them something to smile about.

ilovenj
01-25-2007, 10:19 PM
Mr. Corzine is doing a great job. I think New Jersey has a reason for high property tax? NJ has quality, I said quality services and I know the people of NJ are proud and feel proud when they write the tax checks. I fully endorse tolling all the highway's we take for granted. It helps NJ be strong. Corzine will give tax relief. The people need to be patient, but in the meantime, have pride that your tax money goes to support NJ.Corzine kept his promise by eliminating corruption in Trenton He fired that woman who paid off the police to free her jailbird boyfriend. . I believe that our great Legislature deserves the pensions they earned. They work hard to give us our quality life. I am proud to be NJ and proud, I said proud to pay my taxes to be apart of NJ. I will support Unions that vote Democrat. If they vote for a pension cut this November, that means they want to keep NJ strong. Amen

Marianita
01-25-2007, 10:46 PM
Hi ilovenj, There is much truth in what you say. I am all for paying my taxes. I however do not agree that there should be more toll booths. Toll booths are fine if everyone can afford them. I know the money is needed for different things. I have a lot of pride in New Jersey, more then you would imagine. The problem I see is that this beautiful state could be taxed to the limit. I realize Corzine is trying to lower taxes but will not do so by continual taxing this and that. I question the wisdom of Corzine shutting down New Jersey. I realize it was a last resort. At any rate I am well aware that New Jersey has quality. I am glad my son moved there 3 yrs ago. He has been content with his job and family life there. My new grandson was born there in Mt Holly 4 months ago. I say he is a very fortunate little guy to have been born there. I do respect your point of view. Marianita

ilovenj
01-26-2007, 09:56 PM
Thank you for agreeing with me. NJ is the best and we are proud to have the best taxes. When I pay my NJ tax, I feel an adrenilian of pride. When the Democrats win their seats in November, thanks to the Union votes, Pensions will be cut to help keep NJ running. I am proud of our Unions voting for a pension cut to help NJ. WIth this much pride, I am happy to call myself NJ.

Marianita
01-26-2007, 11:22 PM
You are so very welcome ilovenj. I am also proud to call my self NJ. There is something about the place. When I set my feet on NJ soil I am home. My son adjusted so quickly to NJ life that at his job they named him ''Jersey Rich''. Talk about pride in a place. When I am able to move there I am going to live in Mt Laural. Take care. Marianita

ilovenj
01-27-2007, 12:59 AM
Mr Corzine should be commended for the great work he is doing for NJ. He has stabalized our economy and brought our property tax down by 20%. Their should be a statue of Mr Corzine in every School in NJ to show students who saved NJ. Mr Jon Corzine

Marianita
01-27-2007, 10:31 AM
Hi ilovenj I say, there very well may be a statue. Unfortunately these things are done after one has departed this life. At any rate 20% is 20%. Marianita

NJPRIDE
01-27-2007, 10:45 AM
Mr Corzine should be commended for the great work he is doing for NJ. He has stabalized our economy and brought our property tax down by 20%. Their should be a statue of Mr Corzine in every School in NJ to show students who saved NJ. Mr Jon Corzine

ilovenj, You are being sarcastict right ? Please pay attention to the news. Corzine has not brought down our taxes 20%. No property tax relief bill has been signed into law at this time and the unions, town mayors, and others will not let any relief come at the expense of their benefits or losing power. When we are paying twice the national average for property taxes, 20% will not make any difference. We will only get a $800.00 tax credit. We on average pay $6,000 per year. My Uncle pays $12,000 a year (for WHAT)? Is 20% going to help? If that 20% goes into effect, taxes will have already gone up to a point where that 20% will only get us down to where we are now. Corzines most recent approval rating was 42%. People in this state are starting to question if any relief will ever come. If the economy was so great in N.J. why is our unemployment rate higher than the national average when before he took office it was lower? Why did he raise the sales tax 16%? Why are people moving out of N.J. at an alarming rate? In my opinion he may already be close to losing the next election if he runs. I for one will not vote for the Democrats in Nov.! Under their so-called leadership the state is sinking deeper and deeper into a hole and they do not care! They dont want a comptroller to have to much power because then he could tell us where our tax money is going. Is that fair to us? If you look at the front page of the Star-Ledger this past Thursday a headline is " Legislators slice another reform from pension bill". The Democrats are not helping this state at all. No reform is taking place under these people. The unions in this state are only looking out for themselves and as I said will NOT give up anything for the state. Corzine is all talk and is proving it every week he is in office. It is becoming a bigger joke every day. And the only reason Farber left was because of public pressure, Corzine admitted he did not ask her to leave. As far as a statue of Corzine at schools, those statues would end up being brought down like Saddams statue in Bagdad! Have a good day and a pleasant tomorrow!

Marianita
01-27-2007, 10:50 PM
Hi NJPride, I read on South Jersey.com that Corzine was lowering the property taxes 20%. Is that something that did not go through or Corzine didn't follow through? I would like to know if it is true or not. Marianita

MITHRANDIR
01-27-2007, 11:01 PM
Hi NJPride, I read on South Jersey.com that Corzine was lowering the property taxes 20%. Is that something that did not go through or Corzine didn't follow through? I would like to know if it is true or not. Marianita

Not true yet. ( I think he has stated that he wants to lower property taxes by 20%)

If it becomes reality, it will be interesting to see if (a) Spending decreases to keep in line with reduced revenue (b) will fees/taxes increase elsewhere to overshadow the 2-% decrease in property taxes

JerseyDevil
01-28-2007, 12:12 AM
Corzines Property Tax relief is a joke. Everyone can read and comment more about it on the Property Tax Relief thread (http://forum.aboutnewjersey.com/showthread.php?t=1211). He's in bed with the unions, so nothing is going to happen. Every special interest has their hand in the NJ Benefits Cookie Jar and no one is going to budge. Unions don't want to give up their inflated pensions, the politicians don't want to give up their multiple office holdings, the municipalities don't want to merge, etc. New Jersey will have property tax relief win pigs fly!

BTW - I have to agree with NJPride. Either ILoveNJ is being sarcastic or I would have to say that he must be a Corzine helper who goes on messageboards to try to defend Corzine's actions. It's not unusual. Corporations do it all the time.

Marianita
01-28-2007, 02:16 AM
Hi Mithrandir, Thankyou for clearing this matter up. Now I remember reading that Corzine wanted to cut property taxes by 20%. I had asked my son if he felt that would be a significant amount as it seemed to me very little in the grand scheme of things. Tell me if I am right or wrong but property is expensive in New Jersey. Isnt 20% very little to be of much help to a home owner? And do you think that Corzine will tax something else to make up for the 20% reduction in property taxes? With a huge deficit as it is it may amount to just moving money around with nothing gained. What do you think? Marianita

MITHRANDIR
01-28-2007, 01:36 PM
Hi Mithrandir, Thankyou for clearing this matter up. Now I remember reading that Corzine wanted to cut property taxes by 20%. I had asked my son if he felt that would be a significant amount as it seemed to me very little in the grand scheme of things. Tell me if I am right or wrong but property is expensive in New Jersey. Isnt 20% very little to be of much help to a home owner? And do you think that Corzine will tax something else to make up for the 20% reduction in property taxes? With a huge deficit as it is it may amount to just moving money around with nothing gained. What do you think? Marianita

20% reduction of property taxes is a step in the right direction.

20% of $1,000 is $200. 20% of $10,000 is $2,000.

The problem is what will they do elsewhere in the revenue collection/gov't opperation. If they just increase "taxes/fees" to compensate for the 20% reduction, then it will not make much of a difference.

The gov't will need to reduce spending. This means that the gov't will need to make difficult choices about how and where they spend the peoples money. As said elsewhere, the people in gov't are either unwilling or unable to reduce spending. :(

ilovenj
01-28-2007, 09:04 PM
Im glad you agree that we in N.J. should pay taxes to support the greatest state in America. I hope Mr Corzine raises our sales tax to 8%. Im proud to pay N.J. for the great state it is. Our Politicains get multiple pensions because they do multiple jobs. Sounds fair to me.

Marianita
01-28-2007, 10:02 PM
Hi Mithrandir,
I see where a 20% tax cut would be fine. The problem is spending. There would not be such a huge deficit if the people's money was wisely spent. I really feel that cutting funds for universities is wrong. Infact that is where more money should be alloted. The people should have a choice as to where and how their money should be spent. It could be that the people in government just do not know anymore how to reduce spending as it has gotton out of control. Marianita

Marianita
01-28-2007, 10:10 PM
Well, Everyone should pay their taxes. My son said the taxes are high but it is worth it because he is happy there. But he did say the taxes are too high. Why on earth would you want Corzine to raise the sales taxes to 8%? What would be done with the tax increase? Now that would be interesting to see. Marianita

ilovenj
01-29-2007, 03:28 PM
Remember, the people of N.J. voted Mr. Corzine as our Governor. We must have faith in our decision. We pay more then twice the national average because is N.J. is twice as better then any state. I support Mr. Corzine and his ethics. We have the best unions in N.J. and if they think we should pay more taxes to support them, then I don't see the problem. We have the hardest working Government in the nation and all they get is 2 measly part time pensions and people complain about paying a little tax. If you love N.J., then be proud to pay your property tax.

Marianita
01-29-2007, 09:38 PM
Hi ilovenj, I never thought of it quite that way. I would say I am proud to do whatever the law says we must do. Jesus paid taxes too. But you are talking to someone who pays alot of taxes as I have properties. I also work full part and have a part time job. When I get moved to NJ to live I will pay my taxes there also as I always obey the law. The IRS loves people like me. lol. But I know of no one who loves to pay taxes. There is not much choice in the matter. And I do love NJ. But when it gets right down to it, although I pay taxes and will in NJ I would rather have the money for Cherry Hill Mall. That is one reason I work so much. Marianita:lmao:

ilovenj
01-30-2007, 10:25 AM
Thank you Marianita for 100% agreeing with me. If you choose, I said choose to live in N.J., the then you should support the state with paying your share of taxes. I feel pride when I pay my sales tax. The state taxed my health club and I pay it with pride. I am proud of N.J. and its legislature. I look forward in future taxes. I know when I pay, I support N.J. If Corzine does not give tax relief, at least I have the satisfaction knowing that money helps the state.

JerseyDevil
01-30-2007, 12:03 PM
You know - ILoveNJ - You can pay more in taxes if YOU wish. I'm sure since you think that paying high taxes are so great and a sign of love for the state you would have no problem giving the inept state government more of YOUR money. Most people in the legislature are tied to special interest groups and it is a fact that NJ has one of the most corrupt governments in the country. high taxes are not a sign of loving the state. As for the unions - all they are is a large corporation. I would rather support a store or business that are NON-union than those money grubbers who would rather bankrupt and hold the state hostage. Unions are waste anymore - except for supporting the mafia and paying for those nice vacation homes in the Caribbean for the union bosses.

If the legislature loved the state, if the governor loved the state - then they would be doing things that actually supported the state, instead of giving oour tax money to sports teams who carry NY on their uniforms or building billion dollar tunnels to send our jobs over to NY. They would be working to attract businesses to our great cities, like Newark and Jersey City.

ilovenj
01-30-2007, 06:12 PM
Im glad you also agree with me. N.J. Rocks. Mr. Corzine Rocks. N.J. Goverment Rocks. In 1985, Mr. Kean gave us a motto " N.J. and you, perfect together" Mr. Corzine should endorse " Pay your taxes with pride" . That works for me.

ilovenj
01-30-2007, 08:13 PM
We in N.J. don't want to lose Mr.Corzine. You want proof?
Read :

http://wcbstv.com/politics/local_story_341140803.html

A Quote:

"A Corzine spokesman said Thursday that the poll reflected the fact that New Jerseyans were pleased the job the governor was doing and didn't want him to go. "

MITHRANDIR
01-30-2007, 09:38 PM
Im glad you also agree with me. N.J. Rocks. Mr. Corzine Rocks. N.J. Goverment Rocks. In 1985, Mr. Kean gave us a motto " N.J. and you, perfect together" Mr. Corzine should endorse " Pay your taxes with pride" . That works for me.

ilovenj,
I think you are speaking with tongue firmly in your cheek.
================================================== =======
Regardless of the money that people pay to gov't, it is important that gov't spends our money wisely. We need to get the best value for each dollar that we spend.

If people in gov't cannot spend our money wisely, then it is time to vote new people in who will do a better job of spending our money responsibly.

I think Corzine's idea of a controller (sp?) that can audit various parts of
gov't spending (at all levels) is a good idea.

There needs to be accountability in how gov't spends our money.

Marianita
01-30-2007, 11:36 PM
Hi ilovenj, I say. Since you have to pay the taxes anyway you may as will have a good attitude about it. I am willing to bet that the IRS is just as pleased as you are. '
Now I do not as yet pay taxes in NJ but I sure help the economy with my spending when I am over there.
Corzine just might get around to raising the sales tax again but I think we are safe for awhile. I also agree with Mithrandir that government spending can be controlled with audits. As you must be well aware, New Jersey has an enormous deficit from spending.It boggles the mind. I realize that the deficit was already there when Corzine took over. I do not know if McGreevy made any headway with it or not. It is funny that there is not much being said about it these days, almost like out of sight out of mind. Marianita:confused:

ilovenj
01-31-2007, 11:14 AM
Press Roundup Corzine Shows True Colors
Great editorial from the Asbury Park Press on Jan. 29, 2007

If you think for one minute that Governor Corzine or that bunch under the gold dome cares one bit about you and your family, you are out of your mind. They are shameless and soulless.

The latest example: Corzine's new list of board and commission appointments. It is chock full of hacks and people with a vested interest in perpetuating the status quo: government that serves elected officials, developers, labor unions, and others who feed at the public trough -- at the expense of taxpayers and good public policy.

In a startling display of contempt for taxpayers, the appointments list includes nominations that would fill two county tax boards -- prized patronage plums -- beyond levels that would be imposed under proposed legislation. Lawmakers are trying to downsize county tax boards after they unnecessarily expanded them -- solely for political reasons -- two years ago. Corzine knows that. He obviously doesn't care.

One of the four tax board appointees, Philip Thigpen, is chairman of the Essex County Democratic Committee. Another, Kevin P. Egan, is the brother of Middlesex County Assemblyman Joseph Egan. Business as usual.

Other appointments on the list further cement Corzine's reputation for being joined at the hip with unions and developers:

Raymond Pocino, arguably the most powerful union president in New Jersey in his role as vice president and eastern region manager of the Laborers' Union, was appointed to the New Jersey Turnpike Authority. That poses an automatic conflict of interest.

Edithe Fulton of Toms River, past president of the New Jersey Education Association, was appointed to the state Board of Education -- the first former NJEA president to be named in recent memory.

Red Bank attorney Ed McKenna, a protege of recently jailed Democratic power broker John Lynch, was appointed to the state Planning Commission.

We had hoped Corzine would be different. We had hoped he would keep at bay the special interests that have helped make New Jersey unaffordable and have blocked reform. We hoped his poor judgment in installing Zulima Farber as attorney general was an aberration. These latest sorry appointments prove it was nothing of the kind. Corzine is one of them.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

How Plans for Tax Reform Were Pecked to Pieces:
Five Moments Illustrate NJ Leaders' Inability to Aid Homeowners
This is an in depth story from The Star-Ledger with quite a self explanatory title and subtitle. Highlights:

It was six months ago today when Governor Jon Corzine and state leaders pledged to "get serious" about reforming the system that led to runaway property taxes.

Corzine convened a historic legislative session, challenging lawmakers to attack the "sacred cows" that paralyzed tax relief. Legislators formed four committees, held dozens of public hearings and pounded out 98 proposals that filled more than 500 pages.

The goal was simple: Reduce most property taxes 20 percent. Make it possible by cutting bloated pensions and benefits; consolidating some of New Jersey's 1,182 governments and school districts; capping yearly local tax increases at 4 percent; retooling the school aid formula; and establishing a state watchdog against wasteful government.

But the proposals have taken a unusual route, even by Trenton standards.

Instead of facing public scrutiny and debate in legislative committee hearings, they were hustled into Room L-202. Also called the Senate Majority Caucus Room, it contains a 36-foot conference table surrounded by brown leather chairs under a trio of recessed skylights. There is a sideboard where chicken and pasta from one of Trenton's top Italian restaurants are usually simmering in chafing dishes.

In that room, 22 Democrats, under pressure in an election year, whittled, molded, and reshaped the bills for the Senate floor.

What has emerged from that room in recent weeks is a reform package that looks vastly different from the one that went in.

School district consolidation? Gone. A ban on pensions for part-timers? Forget it. An all-powerful comptroller? Hardly.

Property tax reform is not dead. But even some party stalwarts say the process has all but ensured that New Jerseyans won't see the dramatic change they were promised.

"Somewhere along the way, we lost our heart," Sen. John Adler (D-Camden), who chaired one of the four special committees, said last week. "On almost every reform effort we've deferred to special interests, and every time we've done that, we've hurt the public interest. We'll end up with higher property taxes, more homeowners leaving New Jersey, more businesses leaving the state, and a bigger crisis next year."

There is no single point where the plan jumped the tracks. But a few key moments in the past seven weeks illustrate how and why reform has stalled.


How Plans for Tax Reform Were Pecked to Pieces:
Five Moments Illustrate NJ Leaders' Inability to Aid Homeowners
This is an in depth story from The Star-Ledger with quite a self explanatory title and subtitle. Highlights:

It was six months ago today when Governor Jon Corzine and state leaders pledged to "get serious" about reforming the system that led to runaway property taxes.

Corzine convened a historic legislative session, challenging lawmakers to attack the "sacred cows" that paralyzed tax relief. Legislators formed four committees, held dozens of public hearings and pounded out 98 proposals that filled more than 500 pages.

The goal was simple: Reduce most property taxes 20 percent. Make it possible by cutting bloated pensions and benefits; consolidating some of New Jersey's 1,182 governments and school districts; capping yearly local tax increases at 4 percent; retooling the school aid formula; and establishing a state watchdog against wasteful government.

But the proposals have taken a unusual route, even by Trenton standards.

Instead of facing public scrutiny and debate in legislative committee hearings, they were hustled into Room L-202. Also called the Senate Majority Caucus Room, it contains a 36-foot conference table surrounded by brown leather chairs under a trio of recessed skylights. There is a sideboard where chicken and pasta from one of Trenton's top Italian restaurants are usually simmering in chafing dishes.

In that room, 22 Democrats, under pressure in an election year, whittled, molded, and reshaped the bills for the Senate floor.

What has emerged from that room in recent weeks is a reform package that looks vastly different from the one that went in.

School district consolidation? Gone. A ban on pensions for part-timers? Forget it. An all-powerful comptroller? Hardly.

Property tax reform is not dead. But even some party stalwarts say the process has all but ensured that New Jerseyans won't see the dramatic change they were promised.

"Somewhere along the way, we lost our heart," Sen. John Adler (D-Camden), who chaired one of the four special committees, said last week. "On almost every reform effort we've deferred to special interests, and every time we've done that, we've hurt the public interest. We'll end up with higher property taxes, more homeowners leaving New Jersey, more businesses leaving the state, and a bigger crisis next year."

There is no single point where the plan jumped the tracks. But a few key moments in the past seven weeks illustrate how and why reform has stalled.

http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-11/116996351079750.xml&coll=1

JerseyDevil
01-31-2007, 04:01 PM
ILoveNJ - I see that we were correct - HEAVY sarcasm on your part. :D So tell us how you REALLY feel about Corzine and his taxes?

BTW - New Jersey can learn a lot from Switzerland and how low taxes can benefit our state. Not that our tax happy politicians would understand - but maybe if New Jerseyans start waking up, otherwise we will be a very poor state. This article was on BBC.com...



Swiss low-tax policy irks EU (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/6313671.stm)
By Imogen Foulkes
BBC News, Bern

Switzerland's decentralised taxation system is causing irritation among its European Union neighbours.

The row was triggered by the decision, late last year, of the French rock star Johnny Hallyday to leave France and take up residence in the Swiss Alpine resort of Gstaad.

Hallyday, who has complained publicly about the high taxes in France, will now pay tax not on his multi-million-dollar income, but on the value of the fairly modest chalet he has built himself in Gstaad.

All he has to do in return is promise to live in the chalet for at least six months of each year.

In France, where Hallyday is a national icon, there is anger. Advisers to the French presidential candidate Segolene Royal have accused Switzerland of "looting" its neighbours.

Many high-earning celebrities, among them Charles Aznavour, Michael Schumacher and Tina Turner already live in Switzerland for tax reasons, and it is rumoured that the British pop star James Blunt will be the next to arrive.

'Unfair subsidies'
But aside from the irritation over the loss of celebrity tax income, Switzerland's neighbours have a more serious concern.

Swiss cantons are allowed to set their own taxes and many are now engaging in an internal corporate tax-cutting competition.

Canton Obwalden, in central Switzerland, slashed its corporate tax rate to just 6.6% at the start of 2006; it attracted 376 new companies in just 11 months.

The European Commission has warned that this may constitute an unfair subsidy under the European Free Trade Agreement.

"Talk to any tax expert," said Michael Reiterer, the commission's new ambassador to Switzerland.

"This is recognised as a subsidy. And there we think Switzerland should think a bit whether behaviour which is clearly outlawed in the EU is the best policy to follow in such a close relationship between two partners."

It is true that foreign businesses are beating a path to Switzerland's door, primarily to Zurich.

Its overall tax rate of 21% is not the lowest in Europe, but still far lower than Switzerland's immediate neighbours Germany, France, Italy and Austria.

Zurich 'grateful'
Google, Kraft and IBM have all chosen Zurich as their European headquarters. Google is set to expand its Zurich office this year from around 300 staff to 1,600, making it the biggest Google office outside the United States.

Stefan Kux, head of economic development for Zurich, is not the least bit worried by the complaints from Brussels, in fact he sees them as quite positive.

"We are profiting from the mistakes of our neighbours," he explained. "They are making economic promotion for us for free, everyone now knows that Switzerland has an excellent tax system, so I'm very grateful."

Switzerland is not in the European Union, nevertheless it does need good trade relations with the EU, and has spent 10 long years negotiating a set of complicated bilateral deals.

No-one now wants a row with Brussels, but within the Swiss government there is little patience with Europe's objections over tax.

"The Swiss position is on very safe ground," insisted Adrian Sollberger, spokesman for Switzerland's office of European policy.

"We do not have an agreement to harmonise taxes, none whatsoever, so by definition there cannot be any infringement of any agreement between Switzerland and the EU."

Quality of life
Many in Switzerland suspect that the complaints are inspired by a more basic emotion than any real legal concerns; jealousy that the little country which refused to join the European Union should now be doing so well.

Stefan Kux points out that Zurich, which regularly tops international quality of life surveys, has far more to offer than competitive tax rates.

"We are Big Apple big city and at the same time Long Island lifestyle," he said. "It's a very small city, we have a lot of multinational companies, but in five minutes you are in the countryside.

"You can't find that in London, or Frankfurt or Shanghai. And I think this mixture of the mountains and the business, good quality of life, I think that's the uniqueness of Switzerland."

That point of view is supported by Randy Knaflic, head of human resources for Google in Zurich.

"It is true that the corporate tax, and the personal tax rates, are big advantages," he admits. "Especially when you're recruiting a computer scientist who's been paying 40 or 50% tax in one of the neighbouring countries."

"But the comparison I make is living nine years in New York City," he continued. "In New York I had a wonderful apartment, but in the morning I'd wake up and look out the window and wave to my neighbour. Here I wake up and look out and I see the Alps."

But Brussels' quarrel is not with Switzerland's quality of life but with its tax system, and there the EU has made it clear it expects some compromise.

So far, the Swiss government will not budge; ministers say they view an attack on the tax system as an attack on Swiss sovereignty.

The row is sure to simmer on. Meanwhile the businesses and the celebrities just keep on coming.


New Jersey needs to attract businesses, provide jobs locally, instead of people commuting into NY and Philadelphia.

New Jersey is basically the France of America - high taxes and strong unions.

Marianita
01-31-2007, 07:58 PM
Hi ilovenj, Do not feel too bad because you did not know all these things. I myself have been keeping up with NJ news as well as my own plus working and all. The only way I have managed to keep up is to check the news every day. I am doing that for 2 states. lol. Take care. Marianita:)

ilovenj
02-01-2007, 07:01 PM
The news statement was sarcastic, but the point is well made. Mr. Corzine is leading N.J. to a strong economy. I'm sure we will sell off the useless Turnpike that brings little revenue to N.J. If their are many layoffs, then the sacrifice of those Turnpike workers will be made. They are Union, they understand and fully support Democrats. If the Democrats make a decision that lays them off, I'm sure they will be proud that their sacrifice will make N.J. better. I'm hoping we can count on their votes in November to keep the Democrats in power.

Marianita
02-01-2007, 07:37 PM
Hi ilovenj, Am I to understand that you are referring to the toll booths on the turnpike? If so I cannot agree that sacrificing jobs is something to be proud about. Or did I misunderstand you? Marianita

ilovenj
02-01-2007, 10:49 PM
Yes, I'm sure that the Tollbooth Unions agree that N.J. comes first and the unions voted for Mr.Corzine, as I did. Then Mr. Corzine may feel that leasing the Turnpike and Parkway will help strengthen N.J. , Then I agree its a great idea. If Union jobs are sacrificed, then its for the best. The Unions trust the Democrats to make the right decisions. I trust the Democrats. They will be ok, as long as they live in N.J. and continue to vote Democrat. I'm sure the Executives though will keep their much deserved pensions. This will give comfort to the basic Turnpike and Parkway worker. The tollbooth worker can always get another State job. Go Unions, Go Democrats!!!

Marianita
02-01-2007, 11:18 PM
Hi ilovenj, I should hope that the toll workers can get other jobs. But don't you feel that now that the police are catching the ones who try to escape paying the tolls that money can be made from the tolls? It seems logical. The state of New Jersey needs the money. Marianita

ilovenj
02-02-2007, 09:32 PM
If the Toll workers cant find new jobs, then thats to bad. Their sacrifices will help N.J. strong. We are giving up nickles and dimes for a multi billion dollar lease. This helps pay N.J. the money it needs upfront. Our Politicans need to get N.J. on track. Unions understand they may have to be let go, but thats the price of wanting to be N.J. Democrats Rule!!!!

Remember, N.J. Democrats need, I said need your votes this November. Lets support them, Lets support a strong Democratic N.J.

Marianita
02-02-2007, 10:28 PM
Hi ilovenj, It is all very well to have a love of NJ and so do I but New Jersey is made up of people who have to work to keep the economy going. I am sure the toll workers can find other employment but it would be well to be a little compassionate too. New Jersey is made up of people and isn't that the issue here, the quality of life in New Jersey? I have strong feelings about people and care about everything and everyone. I suppose that if the unions were done away with, the workers would get plenty of notice anyway. My first reaction is what is going to happen to people as a result of some action taken? You know I want what is best for New Jersey. After all I have my son there. Marianita

NJPRIDE
02-02-2007, 11:32 PM
I myself will be voting REPUBLICAN in November. The Democrats have screwed up everything in Jersey and don't deserve my support! The unions are also destroying the state along with New Jerseys own Axis of Evil - Cody, Roberts, and Corzine. These BUMS MUST be shown the door. Their so-called property tax relief may be illegal according to our state constitution and is being looked into by the proper authorities. These jerks don't deserve any more of my money, they have already stolen and wasted enough!

Marianita
02-03-2007, 12:02 AM
Hi Nj Pride, I quite agree. I will vote Republican also, that is if I could vote there. The tax relief is no where in sight and the unions have got to go. What we need is someone who can manage money. The deficit has to be addressed as it is huge. If the situation continues as is more people will move away. Marianita

ilovenj
02-03-2007, 01:09 AM
I am very compassionate. The unions understand that N.J. is made up of Democrats that they vote in. If these powerful leaders believe selling our highways can save N.J., then so be it. Before you people vote for the laughable republicans, remember N.J. has a strong economy, Why ??? Democrats. Remember to vote with the unions, vote for the Democrats and be a winner.

JerseyDevil
02-03-2007, 01:23 AM
I am very compassionate. The unions understand that N.J. is made up of Democrats that they vote in. If these powerful leaders believe selling our highways can save N.J., then so be it. Before you people vote for the laughable republicans, remember N.J. has a strong economy, Why ??? Democrats. Remember to vote with the unions, vote for the Democrats and be a winner.
NJ has a strong economy? Is that why NJ is losing businesses because of the anti-business mentality of the democrats - namely McGreevy? It's the unions that hold NJ hostage and keep any reform from happening. Selling the Turnpike is a quick fix - which will bite us later on. The democrats told us that by them instituting the income tax that NJ was going to have it's property taxes lowered and once and for all it would solve the problem. So here we are again? Why??? It's time to get these good for nothing, in bed with the union democrats out of office!

ilovenj
02-03-2007, 10:44 AM
You vote in Republicans and N.J. will be laughed off of the United States. We will be bankrupt and are unions will be gone. Our Legislature will be in Chaos. We need people like Mr. Corzine. We need the Democrats. The unions need the Democrats. I'm sure when we all elect the Democrats, you will see that Mr. Corzine is in not in bed with them. Next January, The Democrats will make pension reforms for the thousands and thousands of union members by cutting their pensions to help make N.J. stronger. Our state legislatures will not have their pensions cut. Why should they, they work hard for N.J. If they get an extra pension, it must be because they deserve it. The unions are fully agreeing to help. PROOF: The unions will vote the Democrats in and will trust us to make the right decisions. If cutting their pensions help, then they agree. You like Rutgers, you agree that the football coaches get big raises while 800 instructors get laid off? Football is a hobby, so is reading Harry Potter books. More proof that we need the Democrats. I was proud last year when I saw the signs saying " Firemen for Menendez" .I saw Union members proudly putting signs sayling " Local xxx for Menendez" We all want Democrats. The unions understand. If the Turnpike workers lose their jobs, they should feel proud that they support Democrats, and trust their tough decisions. A decision for a stronger Democratic N.J.

ilovenj
02-03-2007, 10:58 AM
We in N.J. must stop shopping at Non union stores like Walmarts, Target , Wegmens and Sams club. We need to be at the Malls, we need to buy our food at Pathmark. We have to shop and should be spending our money to support the Unions that work in N.J. Now does everyone agree?

Marianita
02-03-2007, 11:16 AM
Hi ilovenj, If it is best to vote democrat why is the state of New Jersey in such a financial crisis? Why is the budget out of control? The property taxes are so high that people are leaving in great numbers. a mass exodus. Elderly are forced to sell out and live in apartments because they cannot afford the taxes. How did all this come about and what can the democrats do about it? The tolls do bring in revenue and they will bring in a lot more now that people can no longer slip through without paying their toll. As you may recall millions of dollars were lost because people neglected to pay the toll fees.It is easy to place the blame but what are we going to do help the situation? Our children and grandchildren are growing up there iin the beautiful garden state and we want a good quality of life for them. By the time my grandchildren are adults everything will be much more costly if you can imagine that. So what do you say? Marianita

ilovenj
02-03-2007, 11:26 AM
No one is leaving N.J. Look how crowded everything is everywhere in N.J.
The funny republicans want you to believe in an exodus. But get real, N.J. is crowded and full of people coming in. If their is an exodus, its people leaving their states to come into N.J. To make everyone happy, multiple state assembly jobs will end. OK, make everyone happy. I agree what the papers say, One assembly said " Having dual positions helps us understand the people better. Now that may end.

Go Democrats!! Keep up the great work!

Marianita
02-03-2007, 02:34 PM
Hi ilovenj, You are certainly right about that. There are a lot of people in New Jersey. I hope I can be one of them one day. Marianita

JerseyDevil
02-03-2007, 03:09 PM
No one is leaving N.J. Look how crowded everything is everywhere in N.J.

You seriously must be living under a rock. New Jersey is estimated to lose a representative in the House at the next census. This means New Jersey will lose another voice in Congress. People are leaving NJ, especially the middle class. ILoveNJ - I can't take you seriously.

As for the Unions being willing to make sacrifices - that is the most laughable thing I ever heard. Who the hell had thousands of people in Trenton whining and picketing because they would have to chip in for their health care benefits? Who is *****ing that they may have their pensions reduced?

Marianita
02-03-2007, 03:43 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, I did read about the mass exodus. I believe I read it in New Jersey Monthly. It is quite frightening don't you think? It is true that there are alot of people in New Jersey but maybe alot less then there were?I realize that people move into homes that are vacated by those who can't afford the hefty taxes. Marianita

NJPRIDE
02-03-2007, 05:55 PM
I myself in the past year have had a sister, her husband, and their son leave N.J. because they cant afford to live here. Next week my wife has a friend who with her husband is leaving N.J. for the same reason as my sister. They are all ending up in Penn. A local paper had an article last year about this mass exodus and it said eastern Penn. is now known as West Jersey.
As for you -ilovenj- I think you head is in the sand, or you are playing around with us all. I will vote REPUBLICAN in November! These unions and politicians must be dealt with and shown that they are not the boss but the people are!
New Jerseys Axis Of Evil, Cody, Roberts, and Corzine are NO good for us!

Marianita
02-03-2007, 06:52 PM
Hi NJ Pride, I was not aware that eastern Penn was now known as West Jersey. Does that mean that your sister will have a Jersey address? I am sorry that they had to move but that is just an example of how things are going. My son has been saving money for the last 3 years to buy a house. He makes a good salary but with the cost of living and his wife staying home to care for the kids it will take time. They live in a lovely complex and now they are wondering if they should not just stay there indefinitely. They know everyone and there is plenty of space. They have found houses they could buy now but my daughter-in-law wants a condo and my son wants his own yard to fix up. lol.They are happy there leasing, for now that is.
I am well aware of the mass exodus having read it in New Jersey Monthly and I read it somewhere else too.It is a shame when people are forced out of their homes with high taxes. Do you think Corzine will give that 20% tax decrease? Marianita

MITHRANDIR
02-03-2007, 07:34 PM
I will vote REPUBLICAN in November! These unions and politicians must be dealt with and shown that they are not the boss but the people are!
New Jerseys Axis Of Evil, Cody, Roberts, and Corzine are NO good for us!

Unfortunately, I am not sure the Republicans are much better than the Democrats.

People from both parties have taken us down this path of irresponsible spending and improper (IMO) running of the state.

I truly think that the state needs to examine what it is responsible for and let the private sector take care of what it is responsible for.

Unfunded mandates from the state have forced many local governments to increase local property taxes.

If this state cannot correct the problems of high property taxes, corruption and poor spending choices, then I think that more people will decide that it will be in their best interest to move to another state.

:( :(

Marianita
02-03-2007, 08:56 PM
Hi Mithrandir, I am sure that is the case. And I have always thought that Corzine and Cody and the rest of his buddies have no idea what to do about the taxes or the deficit. After all, where do you get millions of dollars to fix the budget? The taxes are ridiculous. I agree with what you say about the private sector taking care of what it is responsible for. But the spending choices have been poor ones, some of them and yes high taxes will force some of the people out. Marianita:(

ilovenj
02-03-2007, 09:35 PM
You people need facts

http://www.corzineforgovernor.com

http://www.corzineforgovernor.com/plans/moreaffordable/

http://www.etherzone.com/2005/bish091405.shtml

JerseyDevil
02-04-2007, 02:14 AM
You people need facts

http://www.corzineforgovernor.com

http://www.corzineforgovernor.com/plans/moreaffordable/

http://www.etherzone.com/2005/bish091405.shtml
The first are merely Corzine's own website. Not much truth with those. The last one however does bring out facts concerning Corzine, particularly as they apply to his relationship and dealings with Carla Katz.

Marianita - eastern PA is only referred to as West Jersey because so many New Jerseyans move there to avoid the high taxes of New Jersey, but still live close to it. Many New Jerseyans however are moving to North Carolina and Georgia.

As for Corzine giving the 20% tax decrease, it will only happen through bait and switch tactics. Taxes go down in one area, but are raised in another. Then they can claim 20% tax decrease, when actually it's just been moved to another area.

Marianita
02-04-2007, 10:50 AM
Hi Jersey Devil, I thought so but thought I would ask. I guess we just have to wait and see as regards the tax decrease.
Hi ilovenj, I believe this board is here to present different points of view. We have facts, lots of them and we all see things a bit differently. Anyway there is no reason we cannot have fun on this board. I know I do.:) Marianita

ilovenj
02-04-2007, 03:44 PM
Look at today's paper. We have property tax relief. I am so excited that this was made possible by our great Democrats. Remember in November. They will need our support then. They deserve it as they came through. Mr. Corzine truly rocks. Remember, the laughable Republicans tried to stop this and keep the taxes high.



http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070204/NEWS/702040486/1001



On the 8th day, God created Democrats

Marianita
02-04-2007, 04:37 PM
Hi ilovenj, How very wonderful. You have made my day. I will let my son in Marlton know right away. By the way God made Republicans too. :lmao:
Marianita

JerseyDevil
02-04-2007, 04:59 PM
Look at today's paper. We have property tax relief. I am so excited that this was made possible by our great Democrats. Remember in November. They will need our support then. They deserve it as they came through. Mr. Corzine truly rocks. Remember, the laughable Republicans tried to stop this and keep the taxes high.



http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070204/NEWS/702040486/1001


We don't have property tax relief yet, nor is there any guarantee that "raises" in the property will be kept at 4%. All that is declared was that it isn't unconstitutional to have graduated property tax relief. I'll wait to see, before uncorking the champagne. Also, I would like to see if the taxes will just be passed onto another area.



AG: Tax-cut plan legal (http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070204/NEWS/702040486/1001)
Bill heads to Senate
Home News Tribune Online 02/4/07
By TOM HESTER JR.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TRENTON — The Democratic plan to cut property taxes by 20 percent for most homeowners is constitutional, state Attorney General Stuart Rabner said Saturday, deflecting claims by Republicans that it would be illegal because it would base relief on household income.

The plan is set to receive final legislative approval in the state Senate on Monday.

Rabner found income can be considered in calculating relief from New Jersey's highest-in-the-nation property taxes.

"We conclude that the questioned provisions are constitutional," Rabner wrote in the opinion released Saturday afternoon by the Governor's Office.

The plan calls for a 20 percent property-tax cut for households earning up to $100,000, a 15 percent cut for those up to $150,000 and a 10 percent cut for those up to $250,000. It would help about 1.9 million of the state's 2 million households.

It would also cap annual property-tax increases at 4 percent. The tax has been increasing 7 percent per year, leading to property taxes that are twice the national average.

The plan is the centerpiece of a 6-month effort by Democrats to cut property taxes.

The bill's sponsors, Assemblymen John Burzichelli, D-Gloucester, and John McKeon, D-Essex, welcomed Rabner's finding, particularly with the Senate scheduled to consider the bill on Monday. If the Senate approves it, it can go to Gov. Jon S. Corzine for his signature.

"This legal opinion is a legal victory for New Jersey residents," Burzichelli said. "It means that the tax cut of up to 20 percent can go forward and lawmakers on both sides of the political aisle can provide support without trepidation."

He urged Republicans to support the plan and "stop listening to conservative lawyers."

The Assembly voted 71-8 Monday to approve the plan, with 24 Republicans supporting it, but on Tuesday Assembly Republicans alleged the plan violated state constitutional provisions that they argued required all property owners to be treated the same.

While they didn't file a lawsuit against the plan, they hinted one might be brought if Democrats either didn't revise it to provide the same relief to all homeowners or asked voters to amend the constitution to allow differing relief to homeowners.

Democrats, who control the Legislature, scoffed at the claim, citing another constitutional provision they said allowed them to set property-tax relief as they saw fit and emphasizing how they want to base relief on income because lower- and middle-income homeowners see more of their money go to property taxes than do wealthier homeowners.

Corzine asked Rabner for a formal opinion, and Rabner said legislative history demonstrates that the Legislature has "maximum flexibility to decide how to calculate such credits and rebates."

Tom Wilson, state Republican Party chairman, said Rabner's ruling wasn't a surprise and referred to a Republican plan to amend the constitution to guarantee a 30 percent property-tax cut for most homeowners and a 20 percent cut for others.

"It is a surprise that the governor and the Democrats refuse to make property-tax relief under this bill permanent by refusing to write this into the constitution," Wilson said. "They're once again kicking the can down the road and employing another election-year gimmick."

All 120 legislative seats are up in November. Democrats control the Assembly 49-31 and the Senate 22-18.

Republicans, in making their claim, relied in part on a 1976 opinion by William H. Hyland, who was attorney general from 1974 to 1978 under Gov. Brendan Byrne.

Hyland concluded that a plan to give senior citizens a property-tax break was unconstitutional because it wouldn't be enjoyed by all homeowners. After that opinion, voters approved amending the constitution to grant property-tax breaks to senior and disabled citizens.

Before Rabner released his opinion Saturday, Hyland told The Associated Press that Republican claims that the plan is unconstitutional needed investigation.

"That is a question that can't be dismissed too readily because it may violate constitutional protections on preferential treatment," Hyland said.

Hyland emphasized he wasn't declaring the Democratic plan unconstitutional, but was considering how the plan would deliver differing relief to homeowners.

"I think that does raise a constitutional question," he said.

But Rabner said lawmakers have "broad discretion" to decide tax relief and "the authority to calculate homestead-tax credits based on a property owner's income."

"Thus, the State Constitution does not preclude consideration of a property owner's income when calculating a tax credit for local property taxes on homesteads," Rabner said.

Marianita
02-04-2007, 05:23 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, Atleast have the champagne ready to open maybe by Monday. :cool: We shall see what happens. Marianita

JerseyDevil
02-04-2007, 05:43 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, Atleast have the champagne ready to open maybe by Monday. :cool: We shall see what happens. Marianita
Actually I have to wait a couple of years. There have been numerous promises that the property tax problem would be solved once and for all and then several years later, we're in the same situation with the same promises. Instituting the income tax was supposed to solve the property tax situation. Well here we are again and have been here for quite a while again. Just because they pass something, doesn't mean it has any lasting affect.

Marianita
02-04-2007, 05:56 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, I was hoping our champagne celebration could take place sooner. :lmao: But let's be hopeful and see what takes place. Now if this is passed by Monday does that mean the property taxes will go down 20% right away? We could also bring out the champagne bottle in 2 yrs if you wish. Marianita

NJPRIDE
02-04-2007, 07:50 PM
Marianita, First let me say ilovenj does not know what he/she is talking about! As reported in The Star Ledger even they (the editors) are skeptical. All the letters written to the editor believe in the long run Corzine and his Democrats are pulling our legs about this so-called relief. Even News 12 New Jersey has been reporting ALL weekend this will not work. I don't know who ilovenj is but it is best to ignore this person as they seem to have an agenda. If you look at everybody else who has chimed in on this topic we all say the same thing, that the Democrats must go in November and Cozine has done nothing positive for the state. Also ilovenj also says this mess is the fault of the Republicans, well they have not been in power in a while so how is it their fault? Remember everybody blames Pres. Bush right now for everything because he is in power, well I am blaming Cozine and the Democrats for this mess because THEY are and have been in power and things have gotten much worse! Again under their so-called leadership some of my family had to leave N.J. and some of my wife's friends are leaving this week. This has happened under the Dems. NOT Republicans! I agree with J.D. we will not know tomorrow if this works (if it passes) but in a couple of years, and by then how many more people will have to leave the state? News 12 reported it right the 20% is a fake number when you take into account no one will be getting a rebate check so that eliminates that money, and the towns can only raise taxes 4% each year meaning after 5 years the relief is gone. Actually they reported the numbers much worse then I did but I don't remember exactually what they said I think the number they gave to start was it would be 15% not 20%. One last thing ilovenj says the Republicans are keeping the taxes high.... the Dems raised our sales tax 16%, NOT the Republicans! Again I think we should All ignore ilovenj as this person has its head in the sand! P.S. If you would like a good idea of what is going on go to www.nj.com.

JerseyDevil
02-04-2007, 08:18 PM
If you would like a good idea of what is going on go to www.nj.com.
If you would like to read the full Star Ledger, but are out of state - you can also subscribe to the online version. This is the FULL newspaper (ads, circulars and everything), but online. Check out - http://ed.StarLedger.com (note it only works in Internet Explorer) I subscribe to this because it prevents newspapers from collecting. :)

Marianita
02-04-2007, 08:31 PM
Hi Jersey Pride, I see what you mean. Especially when you say the republicans have not been in office, only the democrats. So how can the republicans get blamed? The whole situation is a mess don't you think? And it is true. Corzine has don:( e nothing positive as yet. I am going to subscribe to the Star Ledger. Marianita

JerseyDevil
02-05-2007, 05:18 PM
I think Lordmarc had provided a link to this article from the Star Ledger, but I can't remember. Anyway, this demonstrates how the proposals to control property taxes and combat corruption has been great watered down.



How plans for tax reform were pecked to pieces (http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-11/116996351079750.xml&coll=1&thispage=1)
Five moments illustrate N.J. leaders' inability to aid homeowners
Sunday, January 28, 2007
BY DUNSTAN McNICHOL, DEBORAH HOWLETT AND JOHN P. MARTIN
Star-Ledger Staff

The double-wide wooden doors of Room L-202 in the Statehouse were shut tight, but they couldn't muffle the heated conversation last Monday.

Inside, Senate Democrats battled over a proposal to establish a state comptroller, a cornerstone of the attempt at property tax reform.

After a few hours, the lawmakers emerged from the room and hustled down one flight to the Senate chambers. They passed a resolution honoring the Rutgers football team and approved a study to consolidate local government.

Then they went home.

It was six months ago today when Gov. Jon Corzine and state leaders pledged to "get serious" about reforming the system that led to runaway property taxes.

Corzine convened a historic legislative session, challenging lawmakers to attack the "sacred cows" that paralyzed tax relief. Legislators formed four committees, held dozens of public hearings and pounded out 98 proposals that filled more than 500 pages.

The goal was simple: Reduce most property taxes 20 percent. Make it possible by cutting bloated pensions and benefits; consolidating some of New Jersey's 1,182 governments and school districts; capping yearly local tax increases at 4 percent; retooling the school aid formula; and establishing a state watchdog against wasteful government.

But the proposals have taken a unusual route, even by Trenton standards.

Instead of facing public scrutiny and debate in legislative committee hearings, they were hustled into Room L-202. Also called the Senate Majority Caucus Room, it contains a 36-foot conference table surrounded by brown leather chairs under a trio of recessed skylights. There is also a sideboard where chicken and pasta from one of Trenton's top Italian restaurants are usually simmering in chafing dishes.

In that room, 22 Democrats, under pressure in an election year, whittled, molded and reshaped the bills for the Senate floor.

What has emerged from that room in recent weeks is a reform package that looks vastly different from the one that went in.

School district consolidation? Gone. A ban on pensions for part-timers? Forget it. An all-powerful comptroller? Hardly.

Property tax reform is not dead. But even some party stalwarts say the process has all but ensured that New Jerseyans won't see the dramatic change they were promised.

"Somewhere along the way, we lost our heart," Sen. John Adler (D-Camden), who chaired one of the four special committees, said last week. "On almost every reform effort we've deferred to special interests, and every time we've done that, we've hurt the public interest. We'll end up with higher property taxes, more homeowners leaving New Jersey, more businesses leaving the state and a bigger crisis next year."

There is no single point where the plan jumped the tracks. But a few key moments in the past seven weeks illustrate how and why reform has stalled.

DEC. 7: THE PENSION LETTER
Corzine called it a "breakdown in communication." It was early December and lawmakers were struggling to meet their self-imposed deadline to achieve tax relief. Among the most critical pieces required was one that attacked the underfunded state pension and benefits system.

Legislators had pitched 41 proposals, from raising the retirement age and hiking insurance premiums to banning dual-office holders and canceling pensions for part-time public employees. Together they would have cut costs to state taxpayers by hundreds of millions of dollars.

A bipartisan group of lawmakers backed the concept. Thousands of union members and government workers were making plans to rally at the Statehouse.

Then the governor, in a letter to legislative leaders, removed unionized government workers from the proposal, arguing the unions should be able to negotiate for their benefits. Senate President Richard Codey (D-Essex) and Assembly Speaker Joseph Roberts (D-Camden) said Corzine's action sent the wrong signal at the wrong time to lawmakers worried about controversial proposals as they entered an election year. Even allies in his party said reform was crumbling.

Piece by piece, pension reform fell apart. By late last week, the pension bill had shrunk from 131 pages to 64; and the number of proposals to 18. Democratic lawmakers retreated to L-202 to "duke it out" over what to do about the rest.

"What's left to duke it out over?" quipped Sen. William Gormley (R-Atlantic).

Missing were the plans to ban dual-office holders, curtail pensions for part-time employees, and raise the retirement age to 62.

"It serves no legitimate public purpose; it saves no money," declared Sen. Nicholas Scutari (D-Union), the chairman of the special reform committee. "I could not be more adamantly opposed to this bill."

Many of the proposals have been crippled by party's slim majority. Only by getting support from 21 of the party's 22 senators can Democrats spare a floor fight and win passage. A coalition of just two senators in Room L-202 can hold a bill hostage.

Said Codey: "I don't have a lot of margin for error in my caucus."

JAN. 8: LEASHING A WATCHDOG
Sen. Barbara Buono (D-Middlesex) realized Jan. 8, the first day back after the legislators' three-week holiday break, that the plans for a comptroller were in trouble.

Corzine had first advanced his idea for an elected state comptroller while campaigning two years ago. It was the centerpiece of his ethics reform agenda.

The state needed a comptroller, he said, to serve as a citizens watchdog over state and local government budgets.

Almost immediately, it hit a road bump. Within Corzine's first month in office, lawmakers made it clear they would not support an elected state official answerable only to voters. So Corzine agreed to make the job an appointed post, removable only for cause.

Even that was too much, Buono discovered. As Senate Democrats mingled in Room L-202 on Jan. 8, Buono overheard three colleagues from Hudson County discussing the bill she had sponsored.

"A terrible bill," they said.

Sens. Joseph Doria, Bernard Kenny and Nicholas Sacco, the mayor of North Bergen, believed local officials didn't need the state looking over their shoulders. Doria, who is also mayor of Bayonne, protested that local budgets are already scrutinized by other state agencies.

"It was just adding a layer of bureaucracy," Doria said.

Together, the three men wield enough power to halt -- or at least slow -- any bill.

The Hudson delegation spent much of the next week negotiating with the governor. Late last Thursday, the Senate passed a retooled version, one that specifically says local governments do not need pre-approval to sign developer contracts, and one that limits auditing of local government entities.

Doria and Kenny hailed the change as improvements. Corzine also endorsed it, saying, "It has all the powers of anything I had asked originally."

Buono said the law "emasculates" the comptroller's authority. She not only withdrew her name as the sponsor, she bucked her party and voted against it.

JAN. 11: THE LOOSE-FITTING CAP
Three days after Democrats returned from their break, Corzine stood before a packed room at the Kelsey Theatre on the campus of Mercer County Community College.

Dozens of people had lined up behind microphones to quiz the governor about his tax plan, specifically the proposal to cap annual increases in property taxes at 4 percent.

The average New Jersey taxpayer had seen his or her bill balloon 6 to 7 percent each year -- more than twice the rate of inflation.

Corzine had been adamant about the need for a cap, even during his annual address to lawmakers that week. He and lawmakers decided to package the cap proposal with the least controversial reform provision -- a 20 percent tax credit -- so it would have a better chance of success in Trenton.

Many of the people waiting to quiz the governor weren't angry taxpayers looking for relief -- they were municipal or school officials looking to keep revenues coming. They wanted to be spared from the new limits.

"We struggle every year to put together a budget," Princeton Township administrator Jim Pascal told the governor. "We had to cut four police officers last year, when there was no cap."

For the first time, the governor acknowledged there would be exemptions so some towns and school districts could raise taxes as needed.

"This won't be a hard cap," Corzine said. In fact, he went on, "I'm fearful that it is going to be so holey we won't get the savings we're looking for."

By last week, Democrats had identified 27 categories for exemptions. After squeezing out the comptroller legislation Thursday night, Senate Democrats returned to L-202, sat down over pizza and began considering how to expand the list.

continued...

JerseyDevil
02-05-2007, 05:19 PM
JAN. 17: SCHOOL PLAN
Sen. Stephen Sweeney (D-Gloucester) expected opposition, but not like this. More than 2,500 parents, schoolteachers and administrators packed into Washington Township High School, most of them enraged by the prospect of school consolidation.

As part of their tax reform plans, legislators had proposed establishing a "pilot program" consolidating school districts or services in one unnamed county. With it, they hoped, would come the elimination of hundreds of school administration jobs, and possibly the saving of hundreds of millions of dollars. With 48,000 students in 28 separate districts, Gloucester was among the 11 counties considered for the pilot.

The plan had received a lukewarm reception in the Statehouse. In early December, a planned vote on the proposal was quietly withdrawn when it became clear it lacked support. Some blamed the teachers union.

"It just shows the NJEA is still powerful," said Sen. Bob Smith (D-Middlesex), sponsor of the short-lived bill, referring to the New Jersey Education Association.

Critics were mobilizing people on the street. School administrators issued dire warnings about the impact of a countywide school system.

"I walked into a convenience store and a woman's yelling at me: 'How could you possibly take busing away from disabled children?' said Sweeney, who is also Gloucester County freeholder director.

In Trenton, Democrats had hoped to resuscitate the pilot program by letting county residents vote on whether to participate. The meeting at Washington High changed that.

Sweeney told the assembled crowd that the bill could still be amended, but they hadn't come to listen. They taunted him and shouted him down. "A public lynching" was how state Assemblyman Paul Moriarity, also the Washington Township mayor, described the scene.

The next week, Sweeney and Sen. Fred Madden (D-Gloucester) returned to L-202 and told their colleagues they could not support the pilot program provision. Without their two votes, Democrats lacked the majority to push the legislation through.

Its death was complete.

A second bill to target towns and school districts for elimination through consolidation got further. But by the time it passed the Senate last week, the authority to do anything more than propose which towns and school districts might be ripe for consolidation had been gutted.

Sweeney now questions if homeowners really want reform.

"What I found out with that countywide school thing is that people actually like the government they have," he said. "They just don't like what it's costing them."

JAN. 26: SYMBOLIC REFORM
Reining in school costs was supposed to be a critical part of the reform. Commodore Barry wasn't.

John Barry was a hero of the American Revolution and founder of the U.S. Navy. On Friday he achieved another honor: He became a symbol of the tortuous path that lies ahead of any attempt to cut school spending and thus ease taxes in New Jersey.

Property taxes, the largest tab by far for New Jersey homeowners, generate $11 billion for the state's 618 districts. The state chips in an additional $7 billion.

Which districts get how much has long been a focal point of the tax debate.

The Joint Legislative Committee on Public School Funding Reform was one of the four special committees established last summer. Its members promised results by December.

No formula has been proposed. And one of the reform bills to make it to the governor's desk was rejected, partly in deference to Commodore Barry.

The bill would have given school districts the option not to commemorate five patriotic holidays during the year -- a gesture that some supporters said would spare cash-strapped districts a small expense. When Senate Republicans complained about a slight against Flag Day, the proposal ended up back in L-202.

With Flag Day reinstated, Senate Democrats pushed the bill through the chamber and sent it to the governor.

He wouldn't sign.

Corzine used a conditional veto, instructing Senate leaders to reinstate Memorial Day, Veterans Day, Columbus Day, Presidents Day and, yes, a day for Commodore Barry. Each, the governor said, "serves as needed recognition of the many great leaders who have helped form this nation."

One lobbyist said the governor's veto proved the reform efforts have become a joke.

"This was a well-intentioned mission, looking to reduce mandates, made a laughingstock," said Lynne Strickland, executive director of the Garden State Coalition of Schools, a lobbying group that represents dozens of moderate and high-income school districts.

"The bill that emerged was simply symbolic to begin with. In the end it's symbolic of the way the process has gone and the way the property tax reform session has gone in general."

Staff writer Joe Donohue contributed to this report. (Star Ledger)

Marianita
02-05-2007, 07:22 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, I can see it clearly now. The people of new Jersey do not like paying the taxes but don't want schools consolidated and jobs eliminated. Well, with good reason. I would be mad too. When things like this are done the quality of education goes down. I am sure there are other places to save money. I understand how people feel. Corzine is going to sign what he wants to sign and not sign what he does want to.I have noticed that Corzine gives money to places that can wait but wants to take it off universities. Education is very important. There seems to be a question of values here and poor choices. Marianita

JerseyDevil
02-05-2007, 07:27 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, I can see it clearly now. The people of new Jersey do not like paying the taxes but don't want schools consolidated and jobs eliminated. Well, with good reason. I would be mad too. When things like this are done the quality of education goes down. I am sure there are other places to save money. I understand how people feel. Corzine is going to sign what he wants to sign and not sign what he does want to.I have noticed that Corzine gives money to places that can wait but wants to take it off universities. Education is very important. There seems to be a question of values here and poor choices. Marianita
Consolidation of schools doesn't affect the level of education, what it does is eliminate duplicate jobs and makes things more efficient. Yeah, so jobs will be lost, but that has to be done to get out of the financial mess. The double pensions of politicians have to be eliminated, the fact that pensions are paid to part time employees is ridiculous. People are against the retirement age for state employees being raised to 62 when the national retirement age is 65 is another thing that makes no sense to be against.

Marianita
02-05-2007, 08:19 PM
Hi Jersey Devil, Well, I think I can see it. If they have to work until they are 65 they have to work longer to earn the pensions. simple as that. And if they don't want the retirement age to be raised to 62, at what age are they retiring at now? It is usually 65 or an early retirement at 62. Should it not be the same for everyone? I am surprised that those benefits are being given to part time employees. It just proves that some of the money is being is not being spent the right way. I know that elimination of jobs is most unpleasant but it happens all the time. That also contributes to a poor economy. Marianita

ilovenj
02-05-2007, 10:44 PM
Democrats are the reason N.J. is a triple AAA state. The highways are crowded, why because N.J. is a crowded state and we should be grateful that the Democrats keep it in great shape. I'm proud to pay my taxes, I'm proud of our Democratic Government. I hope they get lots of pensions, because they do lots of work, and as one said, it helps them understand the public better. N.J. is great, no thanks to the Republican. I cant help but giggle when I say " Republican" because they are such jokes.

davegering
02-06-2007, 10:59 AM
God created Democrats first then worked out the bugs and created

REPUBLICANS

GIULIANI IN 2008!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !

ilovenj
02-06-2007, 03:46 PM
Think how great America would be if Jon Corzine was President. America would prosper. It was written that N.J. wont share Mr. Corzine. I guess Hillary Clinton will be our next President. We need Democrats. N.J. is an example on how great Democrats run things.

davegering
02-07-2007, 04:04 AM
Maybe he could sell the Pentegon to the French and the Washington Monument to the Germans.

ilovenj
02-07-2007, 09:41 AM
If selling those away will help the economy, then why not. Someone has to pay the bills that Bush ( a Republican) has given us. We all know Mr. Cozine is an expert in balancing the books. Today he signs the bill to bring property tax down. Mr.Corzine did it. Corzine should save our country.

ilovenj
02-07-2007, 10:44 AM
We must remember to boycott all non union stores like Wal-Mart, BJ's, Wegmans and most all Costco. We must shop at Union, I said Union stores. Our Unions come through for us when they vote Democrat. We must return the favor. N.J. Unions are the best, we must pay extra to support them. Its for N.J. and our Unions.

JerseyDevil
02-07-2007, 12:24 PM
We must remember to boycott all non union stores like Wal-Mart, BJ's, Wegmans and most all Costco. We must shop at Union, I said Union stores. Our Unions come through for us when they vote Democrat. We must return the favor. N.J. Unions are the best, we must pay extra to support them. Its for N.J. and our Unions.
Actually I prefer to shop at NON-Union stores. I can't stand unions.

ilovenj
02-07-2007, 12:34 PM
Why would you hate Unions? Unions are why N.J. is the wealthiest state in America. I want everyone here to follow my lead and support our Unions and Democrats in N.J. Remember, they need our votes in November. Democrats have never failed us, we should not fail them. Lets all share a laugh, ready "Republicans" hahahahahahahahahaha.

JerseyDevil
02-07-2007, 02:37 PM
Why would you hate Unions? Unions are why N.J. is the wealthiest state in America.
You got to be joking - that's like saying the mafia is good for NJ. :roll:

ilovenj
02-07-2007, 04:35 PM
What does the Mafia have to do with Unions? Mafia's are illegal. Unions are not. Follow the law, follow Democrats. Laugh at Republicans. N.J. is a very crowded state. Everyone in America are coming here and we dont have enough houses for sale. I guess N.J. is the promised land and Mr. Corzine is our savior

JerseyDevil
02-07-2007, 04:51 PM
What does the Mafia have to do with Unions? Mafia's are illegal. Unions are not.

Well let's see, historically many of the unions have been controlled by the mafia and today they still hold the state hostage, just like the mafia going around demanding payments for protection.


Follow the law, follow Democrats. Laugh at Republicans. N.J. is a very crowded state.

What does the fact that NJ is crowded have to do with anything? especially since only the northeast section around NY is crowded. Our cities have been a disaster area and instead of our great democratic politicians worrying about attracting businesses to revitalize thes cities, they would rather put the money into building tunnels to NY and esporting our jobs. Democtrats NEED to go!


Everyone in America are coming here and we dont have enough houses for sale.

Sorry to tell you this, but there aren't a lot of people coming to NJ. This is one of the reasons why there is fear that the NJ housing market if going to collapse and we will lose a representative in Congress come 2010.


I guess N.J. is the promised land and Mr. Corzine is our savior
What is he saving NJ from - his fellow democrats? They've been the last three governors, the legislature has been democratically controlled. The mess we are in is BECAUSE of the democrats. They're just trying - if you can call it that - to fix their own mistakes.

The mismanagement of Newark under Sharpe James is just another example of the ineptitude of the democrats and what is wrong with the NJ government. This same politician is still a legislator in the state capitol. :roll:

ilovenj
02-07-2007, 10:03 PM
No one here can see your point? Houses are selling everyday in N.J. The roads are packed because everyone lives in N.J. Havent you heard about the house shortages in N.J. There is no houses for sale anymore, well maybe 1 or 2 in each county. Remember to vote Democrat this November, this way we can flush all the Republicans out and clean up N.J. once and for all. I agree with you that we have problems, why? Republicans.

JerseyDevil
02-07-2007, 11:05 PM
No one here can see your point? Houses are selling everyday in N.J. The roads are packed because everyone lives in N.J. Havent you heard about the house shortages in N.J. There is no houses for sale anymore, well maybe 1 or 2 in each county. Remember to vote Democrat this November, this way we can flush all the Republicans out and clean up N.J. once and for all. I agree with you that we have problems, why? Republicans.
This is just getting completely ridiculous. I'm beginning to think you're just a spammer. :D For someone who loves NJ so much you don't post in any other thread or subject dealing with the state.

ilovenj
02-07-2007, 11:45 PM
You end your statement every time about Rutgers. Do you think its fair that the Football coaches get a ridiculous salary while 800 instructors get laid off and 400 courses are cancelled? People go to college to learn. Rutgers is corrupt. They need the Democrats to clean house and funnel money where it belongs, the meaningful Instructors. You need to learn about how great the Democrats are. Mr.Bush is a prime example of a basic Republican.We Democrats have to find a way to pay for his war so his family can have oil drilling rights. Be thankful Democrats are there to keep Bush in check.

Hillary Clinton for President in 2008.

JerseyDevil
02-07-2007, 11:55 PM
You end your statement every time about Rutgers. Do you think its fair that the Football coaches get a ridiculous salary while 800 instructors get laid off and 400 courses are cancelled? People go to college to learn. Rutgers is corrupt. They need the Democrats to clean house and funnel money where it belongs, the meaningful Instructors. You need to learn about how great the Democrats are. Mr.Bush is a prime example of a basic Republican.We Democrats have to find a way to pay for his war so his family can have oil drilling rights. Be thankful Democrats are there to keep Bush in check.

This is about NEW JERSEY politics - NOT national. If you wish to discuss national issues - then go to the general discussion forum please.

As for 800 instructors getting laid off and 400 courses be9ng cancelled - do you always exagerate exponentially? Also in terms of always "ending" every statement with "Rutgers" it's in my signature. It automatically gets placed at the end of all my posts.

ilovenj
02-08-2007, 11:09 AM
Property tax relief is here. Mr.Corzine has done it again. Now you understand why the sales tax was raised? Because half of the new sales tax goes to property tax relief. Wow, we have savings, thanks to who? The Democrats.

JerseyDevil
02-08-2007, 12:50 PM
Property tax relief is here. Mr.Corzine has done it again. Now you understand why the sales tax was raised? Because half of the new sales tax goes to property tax relief. Wow, we have savings, thanks to who? The Democrats.
Yeah - typical bait and switch. "hey - look we lowered property taxes; don't look over there at the taxes we raised. LOOK!!! LOOK!!!!" what a joke. There is no property tax relief because none of the hard things were actually done. This is all sugar coating for the November elections.

This was in the Star Ledger today...



Progress, Trenton style

This time, we were promised, would be different. Merely tinkering with rebates wouldn’t do. This time Trenton would be serious about changing the way state and local governments raise revenue and how they spend it. In this systematic overhaul, everything was in play, including the previous untouchables.

That’s what Gov. Jon Corzine, Senate President Richard Codey and Assembly Speaker Joseph Roberts said last summer when the Legislature embarked on its special session on property taxes.

Seven months later, what we got was mere tinkering with rebates. No changes in the way state and local governments raise revenue or how they spend it.

A lot of spin is under way to convince taxpayers the legislation adopted this week is groundbreaking. Don’t believe it.

In fact, the promised rebates are only slightly more than what homeowners got in 2004. Only in Trenton would returning to what we had three years ago be considered progress. And the rebates could shrink just as quickly because, despite Corzine’s demands that the reductions be sustainable, there’s no long-term guarantee that the money will be available two or three years from now. Then there’s the property tax cap that’s not a cap at all because there’s an exemption for everything. The school aid formula remains unchanged. With schools responsible for at least 55 percent of the property tax bill, how can any real reform occur without addressing a redistribution of that aid? As with past property tax plans, the overriding goal for legislators has always been to get through the next election. If the type of government reform promised during those heady days last summer had to be sacrificed, so be it. The bills sitting on Corzine’s desk will get those wanting to return to Trenton next year re-elected. It’s just that this time it was supposed to be different. There would be no deepening of the public’s disillusionment with politicians, because this time they would make good on their promises. For a while, we actually believed them. Shame on us.

MITHRANDIR
02-08-2007, 01:07 PM
Actually I prefer to shop at NON-Union stores. I can't stand unions.

I generally agree with this sentiment and prefer to shop my pocketbook.

In some cases though, I will avoid certain stores regardless of their prices.

Some reasons for this:

if information is revealed that shows a particular store to be paying "non-living" wages to employees
encouraging employees to take advantage of public assistance while they do not offer and/or provide medical benefits
Only offering part time positions to avoid providing regular benefits and 401 k style options
level of service does not meet my expectations


A work place being non-union or union will not be the main factor in determining if I shop there or not.

JerseyDevil
02-08-2007, 01:20 PM
Here is another editorial from the Star Ledger concerning property taxes, how Corzine is literally in bed with the unions and how NJ is have the wool pulled over it's eyes by the politicians in Trenton....



How tax reform went into early retirement
Paul Mulshine may be reached at pmulshine@starledger.com.

Yesterday’s Star-Ledger had some good news and some bad news for the residents of the state with the highest property taxes in the nation.

The good news was on page one. The state Senate had passed a bill to send about $2 billion worth of property tax relief checks out right before the November elections.

The bad news that was at the top of Page 17 in an article about the unfunded liability for health benefits for retired government workers and teachers. The tab is $78 billion. To put that in perspective, the state would have to put about $8 billion aside this year and every year to cover that liability.

To put it in even better perspective, let us consider the case of Brett Butterline, a former Rutgers University employee who spoke at a union rally in New Brunswick last week attended by the governor.

Gov. Jon Corzine was there as part of an effort to pander to union activists who are trying to organize administrative employees at Rutgers. After he had finished buttering up the workers, the governor asked for questions from the floor. Butterline went to the microphone.

‘‘I’ve been laid off due to budget cuts, and my problem is I’m only 10 months away from retirement and I’m in danger of losing everything I’ve worked for,’’ said Butterline.

Corzine said the layoff showed the need for university workers to be unionized.

‘‘Sometimes when you have an organized collective bargaining unit, they stand up and represent you against the injustices that occurred in those circumstances,’’ he said.

Hmm. The ‘‘injustice’’ in question was authored by none other than Corzine and his fellow Democrats, who last year slashed the Rutgers budget while lavishing lots of dough on so-called ‘‘Christmas tree’’ items for legislators’ buddies.

That was odd enough. Odder still was Butterline’s age — or lack of it. When I interviewed him afterward, Butterline told me he was 44. How could a 44-year-old be just 10 months from retirement?

Simple, said Butterline. He had accumulated almost 25 years of service under the state’s rather complicated Public Employee Retirement System formula. His pension wouldn’t be much, he said, but he and his family would have statefunded health benefits for life.

That sounded nutty to me. But when I ran it by the Treasury Department, it turned out Butterline was right. The minimum age for state employees to retire with a full pension is 55, but with a mere 10 months more employment, Butterline could indeed have retired with health benefits for life.

Good for him. Bad for us. Corzine doesn’t have $2 billion to give away for tax relief. What he’s got is a giant hole in the budget — this year and for every year to come. The state pension fund is almost as deep in the red as the health benefits fund.

It is disingenuous, therefore, to claim, as Corzine did Tuesday, that this latest election-year giveaway represents ‘‘a turning point in regard to tax reform.’’ The turning point occurred last year, when Corzine decided to take the side of the state workers against the taxpayers.

In the beginning of the reform effort, everyone knew what the first step had to be. The retirement age for public employees would have to be raised to at least 60. And new hires would have to go into some sort of defined contribution plan rather than into the state pension plan.

But under union pressure, Corzine vetoed those reforms right in the beginning. That set a pattern for legislators to chip away at every other measure that would have created real reform.

Even Democrats were conceding as much. State Sen. Nia Gill of Essex County ended up voting against the bill on the grounds that it would do little to solve the property tax problems of towns in her district like Montclair, which may have the highest property taxes on Earth. Gill, who lives in Montclair, told me she can’t go to the supermarket without being cornered by some harried homeowner with an annual tax bill of $20,000 or so.

‘‘They yell at me: ‘When you gonna help us, Gill?’ ’’ she said.

Rebates won’t do the trick, especially not Corzine’s income-based rebates. They give the most relief to those families making less than $100,000 a year. What Montclair needs is a fair share of state school aid, Gill said. Like many suburban school districts, Montclair gets less than 10 percent of its budget in state aid.

‘‘The rebate does not solve the problem of most suburban communities,’’ Gill said.

That’s another problem Corzine swept under the rug. The school aid formula has been taken off the table.

‘‘If we just wanted to go for a rebate, why didn’t we just vote for it in the budget in the beginning?’’ asks Gill.

A good question. But then there wouldn’t have been any news at all — just the same old story.

MITHRANDIR
02-08-2007, 01:27 PM
Here is another editorial from the Star Ledger concerning property taxes, how Corzine is literally in bed with the unions and how NJ is have the wool pulled over it's eyes by the politicians in Trenton....

Sad tale.

The political leaders of this state need to put the good of NJ above their own re-election ambitions.

Only way the state will pull out of this mess. (either that or a major catastrophe)

ilovenj
02-08-2007, 03:54 PM
The problem is people will not vote, they just gripe. The unions will all vote Democrat and when, I said when the Democrats win, you will see a stronger N.J. The Unions know what is best and if they get a pension cut, they understand its for the best. This is why unions vote Democrat. They trust, as all of you should to do the right things for N.J. Now, someone here explained that Wal-Marts abuse employees. Why shop there. Pay a little extra and support a union store. Cut up your Sam's Club card and shop at the Mall. Lets show our support for the unions and show them thanks for supporting Democrats.

JerseyDevil
02-08-2007, 06:27 PM
...when the Democrats win, you will see a stronger N.J.
That's funny since the democrats have been consistently winning for a while now, and New Jersey is getting worse financially. You act as if the democrats aren't and haven't been the ones in power for years. As if the financial crisis was caused by some other force.

BTW - if the unions are so willing to give concessions - then why are they the first to send thousands to Trenton to picket??? Teachers Union anyone???? :roll:

ilovenj
02-08-2007, 06:52 PM
That's funny since the democrats have been consistently winning for a while now, and New Jersey is getting worse financially. You act as if the democrats aren't and haven't been the ones in power for years. As if the financial crisis was caused by some other force.

BTW - if the unions are so willing to give concessions - then why are they the first to send thousands to Trenton to picket??? Teachers Union anyone???? :roll:

How is N.J. getting worse financially? N.J. is one of the most wealthiest states in the country. Why? Democrats. The Unions only picket for attention. They want to show N.J. how they can unite for a fictional pension cut. They will prove my point when they do the smart thing and vote Democrat. Wait and see. The Democrats will win and in result N.J. wins

JerseyDevil
02-08-2007, 07:51 PM
How is N.J. getting worse financially? N.J. is one of the most wealthiest states in the country.

The PEOPLE of New Jersey are the wealthiest in the country, while our government has a 2 billion dollar deficit and basically bankrupt. There is a difference.


Why? Democrats.

Exactly - our state government is nearly bankrupt because of the democrats.


The Unions only picket for attention. They want to show N.J. how they can unite for a fictional pension cut. They will prove my point when they do the smart thing and vote Democrat. Wait and see. The Democrats will win and in result N.J. wins
The unions don't want to give up any of their inflated benefits. They don't want to contribute to their own health care, like most employees have to. They would rather see the state go into bankruptcy than make any concessions. NJ is losing with the democrats in power. All you have to do is just look at the recent audit that was done in Newark and the problems that Sharpe James left. He's even under federal investigation but he's still in the state house. Then of course there was wonderful Torricellii. He was under investigation and the democrats switched him with Lautenburg. It's really unbelieveable how you can defend the democrats with a straight face. :roll:

ilovenj
02-09-2007, 01:56 AM
Are you trying to blame the Democrats for the little problems in N.J.
If their is a problem, the Democrats are the cure.
N.J. is a very rich state , just look around. Your statements are irrelevant.

MITHRANDIR
02-09-2007, 10:24 AM
Are you trying to blame the Democrats for the little problems in N.J.
If their is a problem, the Democrats are the cure.
N.J. is a very rich state , just look around. Your statements are irrelevant.

I think the blame for the problems lie with all of the politicians (Democrats, Republicans and any others) and indirectly by the public for not voting ineffective leaders out of office.

I think that there is a problem with this state. One could look at their neighbors and see who is moving to other states because of the high cost of living (due primarily to the many different types of taxes) in NJ.

I know of several friends/neighbors who are in the process of moving out of state for a more affordable cost of living. If they had their way, they would prefer to remain in NJ and stay near friends and family.

Democrats (and Republicans) are only part of the cure for NJ's problems if they make the choices necessary that will


Reform how education is funding
Reform how the state spends for programs
Causes the state to operate in a fiscally responsible manner
Reform the burden of property taxes (In some cases property taxes can be as high as 50-60% of some peoples incomes, granted this is probably more common with retired citizens)


ilovenj,

Please explain why you think those statements are irrevlavent.

ilovenj
02-09-2007, 06:42 PM
We in N.J. should build a Mount Rushmore type Monument to salute N.J. best Governors. I think it should contain Byrne, Florio, McGreevy and of course Mr. Corzine. It should be built with union labor and funded by the proud people of N.J..

MITHRANDIR
02-10-2007, 07:27 AM
We in N.J. should build a Mount Rushmore type Monument to salute N.J. best Governors. I think it should contain Byrne, Florio, McGreevy and of course Mr. Corzine. It should be built with union labor and funded by the proud people of N.J..

I would appreciate an answer to my question.

In case you forgot:


ilovenj,

Please explain why you think those statements are irrelevant.



Are you trying to blame the Democrats for the little problems in N.J.
If their is a problem, the Democrats are the cure.
N.J. is a very rich state , just look around. Your statements are irrelevant.

NJPRIDE
02-10-2007, 08:22 AM
Now we find out Corzine is looking into the hospital bed tax again. His democratic goons in N.J. are also looking into what taxes they can raise now. This so-called property tax relief is nothing but a joke. They will not get the money through the property taxes but they will bend us over and take it from us another way. These people MUST go in November for the good of the state. I wonder how many more people will leave N.J. this year because of the democrats and their taxes. NEW JERSEYS AXIS OF EVIL, Corzine, Cody and Roberts. I wonder how many other states have an Axis of Evil.

ilovenj
02-10-2007, 02:41 PM
Mr.Corzine has raised the sales tax by a penny. Half of that will go to property tax relief. Mr. Corzine has agreed to that and he is a man of his word. Case closed.

ilovenj
02-10-2007, 02:43 PM
Your Statements are irrelevant because the Democrats run N.J. With the Democrats in charge, N.J. is in great hands. I have made my point.

JerseyDevil
02-10-2007, 03:38 PM
Mr.Corzine has raised the sales tax by a penny. Half of that will go to property tax relief. Mr. Corzine has agreed to that and he is a man of his word. Case closed.
That is where you are wrong. Taxes didn't just go up a penny when you include all the things that used to be tax exempt that we now have to pay taxes on. The Star Ledger estimated that the sales tax went up to about 16%. Some previously untaxed items were such things as magazines and fitness dues. There is a long list of items. Now he wants to revisit taxing hospital beds.

I can tell form your statements that you have never debated anyone. You think that just because you say something that everyone should just accept without you supplying any facts. What is funny though - is when you try supplying facts they're so exaggerated that they're basically lies.

BTW - your comment on McGreevy is just hilarious. He was one of the WORST governors. Not because of his homosexual affair either - but for putting his "lover" into a top position that he was not qualified for - namely NJ's Homeland Security. Then right at the beginning of his term he tried to make the citizens of NJ pay for his family reunion in Ireland which included a $500 a night hotel. In addition he would take the state helicopter to go to family weddings which we had to again pick up the tab on. McGreevey was a joke.

ilovenj
02-10-2007, 07:31 PM
If Mr. Corzine puts a tax on hospital beds, then its a good idea. You must remember, N.J. is a union state and the unions have spoken. The unions want Mr. Corzine and trust him to do the right thing. If people have pay a penny tax on hospital beds, then its a good thing. Unions want this, understand and remember to vote Democrat in November. McGreevy rocked, why? Unions voted him in and that makes him a good Governer.

JerseyDevil
02-10-2007, 08:08 PM
If Mr. Corzine puts a tax on hospital beds, then its a good idea. You must remember, N.J. is a union state and the unions have spoken. The unions want Mr. Corzine and trust him to do the right thing. If people have pay a penny tax on hospital beds, then its a good thing. Unions want this, understand and remember to vote Democrat in November. McGreevy rocked, why? Unions voted him in and that makes him a good Governer.
I'm glad you layout so nicely what is one of the problems with NJ. Contrary to your statements though, the governor nor the GOVERNMENT of New Jersey is supposed to be representing the interests of the unions, they are supposed to be representing the PEOPLE of New Jersey, that is ALL the people of NJ. The unions are another problem with NJ, they are the equivalent of the mafia back in the early 1900's.

As for you statement that people will have to pay a "penny tax on hopital beds", that again shows your ignorance. Hospital beds were previously exempt from tax, which means that they are an item that may see a 7% increase in cost. You might want to do some reading and research before spewing out nonsense and inaccurate information.

ilovenj
02-10-2007, 10:17 PM
Then why dont the people get off their asses and vote? Because they trust the unions to make the decisions for them. Its the right decision. Wait and see when the Democrats win in November, thanks to unions, who excercise their rights to vote. If the people in N.J. refuse to vote, then they need to stop crying, pay their taxes and let the Democrats do what they have to do.

JerseyDevil
02-10-2007, 10:38 PM
Then why dont the people get off their asses and vote? Because they trust the unions to make the decisions for them. Its the right decision. Wait and see when the Democrats win in November, thanks to unions, who excercise their rights to vote. If the people in N.J. refuse to vote, then they need to stop crying, pay their taxes and let the Democrats do what they have to do.
The problem is that people are voting - they're voting with their feet. They're packing up their stuff and moving out of state.

ilovenj
02-10-2007, 10:56 PM
Why is the Traffic so busy? Why is the tollbooths forever having cars go thru them? Why are the malls packed with paying customers? Because N.J. is a fruitful state. Thanks to our great, I said great Democrats.




Remember in November, Vote Democrat

JerseyDevil
02-10-2007, 11:45 PM
Why is the Traffic so busy? Why is the tollbooths forever having cars go thru them? Why are the malls packed with paying customers? Because N.J. is a fruitful state. Thanks to our great, I said great Democrats.

Our politicians have created NJ into a commuter state. Our cities have floundered and are only now coming back - not with the help from Trenton though. You want to know why our tollbooths are full? Because NJ is the main street between New York and Philadelphia and our politicians continue to shortchange NJ and make it even more so. Instead of developing our cities into powerhouses of their own, they're exporting our jobs to NY and Philadelphia and subsidizing those cities. We wouldn't need a second Hudson Rail Tunnel for commuters going to Manhattan if our politicians got off their asses and worked to encourage businesses to move back into Newark, Jersey City, Camden and the other great cities of NJ.

NJ is a great state - but the government and politicians are basically worthless and have been for centuries.

Impeach Corzine
02-11-2007, 09:41 PM
Just for the record, this 20 percent property tax rebate idea that’s been all the rage lately is another joke, no matter what happens to it.
The average New Jersey homeowner pays some $6,000 in property taxes. There are some 1.9 million households that would benefit from the property tax cut. Do the math, and you’re looking at $2.2 billion or nearly 10 percent of the entire state budget going back into our pockets.

Last I checked, we’re one of only two states operating at a deficit. Which means this property tax rebate plan is similar in scope to paying off your Visa bill with a MasterCard. And if that’s not brilliant enough for you, don’t worry it gets worse. The new hot idea in the legislature is to start selling or leasing our toll roads and lotteries. Basically, the state would get a lump sum up front for the rights to these moneymakers.

Now if our lawmakers were going to be smart with the money and pardon me while I spend the next 20 minutes in a full state of guffaw, I’d say it’s a good idea. It would be like if your dear Uncle Bob left you a million bucks. You could be conservative with it (like the state should be) and put it in a safe investment, pulling out maybe $50,000 a year without touching the principal.

But you just know the legislature will not be smart with the money, and they’ll blow through it in a couple of years, which would be the equivalent of taking Uncle Bob’s inheritance and deciding to hang out with girls named "Bunni" who encourage you to not only snort cocaine, but to do so off their stomachs.

Anywho, all this talk about property tax relief, no matter what happens, is just a bunch of smoke and mirrors. Bottom line, we’re paying a fortune in taxes, and will continue to do so. The average New Jerseyan, homeowner or not, pays $5,234 a year in state and local taxes, according to taxfoundation.org. On top of that, we pay seven percent sales tax, the second highest in the nation. The average New Jerseyan ponies up some $841 yearly right there.

What’s even more annoying is that seven percent of the sales tax goes right back to us in property tax rebates. In other words, the state is robbing Peter to pay, well, Peter. And if you’re a pack-a-day smoker, well, you should quit, if only because you’re paying $942 a year in taxes to the state. We get a break at the pump, where the 14.5 cent per gallon tax rate is the fourth lowest in the nation. So if you burn through 40 gallons a week, figure on $300 in taxes there. And then there’s are the little annoying taxes, like on booze, on your phone and cable, and on countless other things. Of course, we’re leaving out federal taxes in all this.

So where does this leave us? Two places: One is a little home ruled locale called "Aggravated," and two, circling May 6 on the calendar. That’s the day, according to The Tax Foundation, that the average New Jerseyan, you and I, will have earned enough money to pay off every last cent of our total tax bill. That’s 126 days, or 34 percent of the year.

ilovenj
02-11-2007, 11:08 PM
N.J. pays taxes, so does the rest of the country. We pay taxes so our state functions. It makes sense to the unions, it makes sense to Democrats, that means it makes sense to me and it should to you. The unions are the backbone of America and in N.J. support Democrats. If the Democrats raise our taxes, the unions will pay them. If the unions need to cut benefits and pensions, then the unions fully understand. We all want N.J. to function. The unions do their part, so do yours, Vote Democrat.

JerseyDevil
02-11-2007, 11:36 PM
N.J. pays taxes, so does the rest of the country. We pay taxes so our state functions. It makes sense to the unions, it makes sense to Democrats, that means it makes sense to me and it should to you. The unions are the backbone of America and in N.J. support Democrats. If the Democrats raise our taxes, the unions will pay them. If the unions need to cut benefits and pensions, then the unions fully understand. We all want N.J. to function. The unions do their part, so do yours, Vote Democrat.
yaaaaawwwnnnn. Broken Record. :roll:

As for Impeach Corzine - welcome. I do heartily agree with your post. I will probably expand my thoughts further. I hope you will stick around and continue to post.

ilovenj
02-12-2007, 01:11 AM
A Vote for Rutgers is a vote for Democrats.
PROOF: Democrats have taken good care of Rutgers. The teachers unions are strong, Thanks to Democrats. I hope you remember that in November.

JerseyDevil
02-12-2007, 01:54 AM
A Vote for Rutgers is a vote for Democrats.
PROOF: Democrats have taken good care of Rutgers. The teachers unions are strong, Thanks to Democrats. I hope you remember that in November.
Yeah - such good care that Corzine and the democrats just cut funding to Rutgers. :roll: Good try though. :p Next....

Impeach Corzine
02-12-2007, 08:19 AM
Thank you for your welcome JerseyDevil. I am sure that you will be seeing me frequently and hearing my opinion regarding how our wonderful state of NJ does not seem to get it when it comes to politics.

As for iLoveNJ, if you want to talk about politics and unions in the state of NJ you need to remember to not bring a knife to a gun fight. Do you need me to remind you of a small issue prior to Corzines election? Corzine had made an undisclosed loan of $470,000 to former girlfriend Carla Katz. That would not be anyone's business except that Katz happens to be head of New Jersey’s largest union, the Communications Workers of America. The Communications Workers of America endorsed his 2000 Senate campaign and his 2005 gubernatorial race.

One item I have to area with you on iLoveNJ is that yes, the Unions do their part… wink wink.

ilovenj
02-12-2007, 12:38 PM
Your Rutgers are over paying, I said overpaying football coaches while instructors are being laid off. You know Im right, its in the papers and you have to have read it. Football is a hobby and has nothing to do with education. What's next for Rutgers? A Starfleet Academy? A Jedi Knight Council? How many more qualified instructors will lose their jobs because of Rutgers stupid spending? The students need the Democrats to control spending at Rutgers. Thank God its the Democrats that run N.J. and not Rutgers.

JerseyDevil
02-12-2007, 01:35 PM
Your Rutgers are over paying, I said overpaying football coaches while instructors are being laid off. You know Im right, its in the papers and you have to have read it. Football is a hobby and has nothing to do with education. What's next for Rutgers? A Starfleet Academy? A Jedi Knight Council? How many more qualified instructors will lose their jobs because of Rutgers stupid spending? The students need the Democrats to control spending at Rutgers. Thank God its the Democrats that run N.J. and not Rutgers.
If you wish to discuss Rutgers funding and cuts - then start a thread in the New Jersey Schools and Education (http://forum.aboutnewjersey.com/forumdisplay.php?f=51) forum. This is discussing Corzine's tax hikes.

ilovenj
02-12-2007, 04:10 PM
I agree, this is about the great work of Mr. Corzine and the great Democrats of N.J. All I see is greatness in the most Powerful state in the Union. The unions run N.J. I am proud of that and if the union's have to pay more for benifits, then Im sure they understand. N.J. is a great state, thanks in part to Mr. Corzine.

Impeach Corzine
02-12-2007, 04:26 PM
I have to laugh at people who applaud ultra-wealthy Gov. Jon Corzine on his new budget proposal to alleviate severe poverty in New Jersey.

Now, if the multimillionaire was to reach deep into his own pockets and pay for his government programs, I'd be first in line to laud his efforts. But, being a good liberal Democrat, Corzine is simply transferring wealth from achievers to nonachievers. He is taking my money and your money to help pay for his programs. And HE gets the credit? What's wrong with this picture? He calls this our "moral responsibility." But don't liberals like Corzine always say government should never legislate morality? But that is when morality does not suit their purpose, of course.

This isn't about morality. Leave the programs for the poor up to the churches. It is not the government's job to help the poor. It is the government's job to create opportunities for people or stay out of the way so that people can prosper.

Corzine's plan is pure Socialism, plain and simple. Along the way, you can bet Corzine will make like a good Marxist and will raise taxes on "the rich," but Democrats never tell you who they think the rich are. If you own a home, Democrats believe you are rich and must share your "wealth" through higher taxes.

Now, do I want the poor people dying in the streets? Of course not. Some people cannot work and they should receive assistance.

But I think Corzine and his ilk would be better served to leave a lot of these people alone. If there were no free money and giveaway programs, many poor people will be forced to work, which is better for them - and better for all of us.

And, while we're at it, how do we define "poor" in this country? If you want to see a truly poor person, go visit India or a Middle Eastern country. That is true poverty.

In America, a lot of the so-called poor people are not as poor as they think they are - or as poor as Democrats lead them to believe.

How many of the "poor" people own an SUV, smoke 1-2 packs of cigarettes a day, own a cell phone and cable television? But when you're constantly told you need help by the Democrats, what are these people supposed to think?

After awhile, they believe the propoganda.

Haven't we learned a lesson from the government trying to help the poor from the Great Society? These Democratic programs simply keep people poor. It is not really helping them. But it does help the Democrats earn their vote in the next election, which is what these so-called compassionate people like Corzine are really after.

Teach them how to make money and stopping sending them money already! It's time for New Jersey government to simply create opportunities for work for the poor. Government should provide a safety net, not a couch for poor people to dry up and waste away.

If Corzine wants to be "morally responsible," he can start by lowering taxes on the middle class and cutting wasteful spending. Of course, don't hold your breath.

Corzine is a liberal Democrat who simply cannot stop himself from overtaxing us to death.

Stop The Tax Man! (http://www.stopthetaxman.org/)

ilovenj
02-13-2007, 11:34 AM
Jon Corzine has only been Governor for a year and he already balanced the budget. He had to make tough choices, but we should be grateful that he did that. Now, N.J. is flowing with massive income and people moving here from all over. If you want to be the best, then you must live in Gods country N.J., proudly governed my Jon Corzine. He deserves a statue, when the Democrats win in November, I hope they get a collection to erect him a statue. I know the people in N.J. will support it.

JerseyDevil
02-13-2007, 12:22 PM
Jon Corzine has only been Governor for a year and he already balanced the budget.
That doesn't mean anything. By FEDERAL law - states MUST have a balanced budget. :roll: The thing is - a properly run state ends up with balancing a budget without having to raise taxes year after year or borrowing from one account to another. :roll:

ilovenj
02-13-2007, 12:56 PM
Here I found a clip that Mr. Corzine tells the truth.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmxvawvXB44

I have not seen it, but if it has Mr.Corzine talking, then it has to be good.



Democrats in 2008. Yes!!!!!!

JerseyDevil
02-13-2007, 01:16 PM
Here I found a clip that Mr. Corzine tells the truth.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmxvawvXB44

I have not seen it, but if it has Mr.Corzine talking, then it has to be good.

Well after seeing the video now I KNOW you are being sarcastic about your support for the democrats and Corzine. :D

These videos are also recommended - Jon Corzine: The Tax Man (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNRy8DPAmec) and It's Spending Stupid (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzvsWgG6Ph8)

This is from the National Taxpayers Union -



New Jersey's Tax Hikes: Sowing Disaster in the Garden State (http://www.ntu.org/main/press_issuebriefs_printable.php?PressID=840&org_name=NTUF)
NTU Foundation Issue Brief 154
Sam Batkins
May 22, 2006

Introduction
New Jersey's fiscal and economic climates are turning decidedly cold despite the approaching summer. The Garden State is one of only ten states that have a structural deficit for Fiscal Year (FY) 2007. Current estimates of New Jersey's poor finances range from a structural deficit of $4 billion to $5 billion (14 to 18 percent of appropriations).[1] The elimination of this shortfall within one year seems highly unlikely. Former Governor Richard Codey summed up conditions when he noted, "The state is pretty much broke."[2]

Taxpayers know all too well that New Jersey's past fiscal policies have done little to attract new residents and business that would drive economic growth and fuel accompanying budget surpluses. From 1993 to 2001, yearly population growth in the state averaged just over 0.8 percent. After 2001, however, growth has averaged a paltry 0.6 percent, with a meager 0.4 percent performance last year.[3] As Governor Jon Corzine admitted recently, New Jersey already has one of the worst tax burdens in the United States—hardly a welcoming beacon for prospective citizens. He lamented that New Jersey currently has a "high level of income taxes," and worried that raising them would burden "the state's overall economic competitiveness."[4]

Voters were likely heartened when, during his campaign in 2005, Corzine stressed, "I'm not considering raising taxes. It's not on my agenda. We have a very high-rate tax structure. I'm not considering it."[5] Voters elected him with a 239,280-vote margin over his Republican opponent Doug Forrester,[6] and five months later (in March) Corzine added during his budget address that "tax increases are a last resort."[7] Thus, Garden State voters might have been a bit startled when Corzine proposed a massive $1.8 billion tax increase (including $1.5 billion in direct taxes and over $300 million in other revenue enhancements).[8] New Jersey previously had the ignominious reputation of a tax-hiking state, but the new budget makes even the most die-hard revenue raisers blush.

New Jersey's Budget History: A Mixed Record
Unlike other states, New Jersey has actually brought in more than it spent (in total revenues and expenditures, from FY 1995 to 2004). During that period, expenditure growth averaged 4.2 percent annually, while revenue growth averaged a robust 5.5 percent per year. Over the 11-year fiscal window (1994 to 2004), the state still managed to maintain responsible levels of overall spending. Expenditures averaged 5.2 percent annually and revenue increased 6.3 percent.[9] So why, with Trenton taking in more than it spends, does it habitually raid taxpayers' wallets for more? The answer can be found during the last economic slowdown, when state expenditures eclipsed revenues by substantial margins.

From FY 2000 to 2002, spending in New Jersey increased 21 percent. As an economic slump set in that caused a rise in unemployment from 3.5 percent in June 2000 to 5.9 percent in June 2002,[10] revenues actually declined 23 percent![11] This spending splurge in Trenton aggravated the current structural deficit, produced massive problems in the state's under-capitalized pension system, and gave lawmakers an excuse to start hiking taxes.

Since then residents of New Jersey have shelled out more in taxes than almost any other state in the U.S. From FY 2002 to 2005, taxpayers and businesses have been forced to foot the bill for $3.07 billion in new levies, and the state ranked first in tax increases during FY 2003.[12] Based on the state's 2005 population, this total amounts to approximately $350 in lost income for every man, woman, and child.[13] That's money businesses don't have to expand and invest in new capital, and resources that families could have used to make ends meet. In addition, despite a 41 percent recovery-driven revenue increase in FY 2003,[14] then-Governor James McGreevey and the Legislature managed to enact over $1.3 billion in tax hikes.[15] This troubling habit has not been confined to taxing the wealthiest of Garden State residents either. All citizens have had to bear the brunt of the nation's 2nd-worst business environment.[16]

Taxpayers have seen a myriad of tax and fee increases such as: reduced exemptions for "rich" residents with $100,000 or more of income, Internet taxes, $497 million in cigarette and other tobacco taxes, $950 million in additional corporate income taxes, and over $1 billion in other taxes and fees. These increased levies, or "selected revenue enhancements" as politicians call them, fueled record growth in expenditures during FY 2005. James McGreevey and Richard Codey increased general fund expenditures 13.3 percent in FY 2005, the eighth-highest amount in the nation, and the highest amount in the Mid-Atlantic region.[17] Regrettably, incoming Governor Jon Corzine has not learned from New Jersey's profligate past, and has proposed a 9.2 percent budget increase, along with $1.8 billion in additional revenue.[18] It seems Mr. Corzine's focus on winning elections kept him from reading the history books.

continued...

JerseyDevil
02-13-2007, 01:18 PM
The "Tax Increases are a Last Resort" Budget
Governor Jon Corzine summed up the proper action needed to address taxpayers' concerns with his budget address. "The solution is simple—stop! We must and we can." His proposal, however, gives a bright green light to massive spending increases and tax hikes. He states that the budget "exhibits a strong sense of fiscal discipline."[19] If $2.6 billion in new spending and $1.8 billion in higher taxes demonstrates fiscal discipline, what does he consider to be extravagance? Despite a large structural deficit and bonded indebtedness exceeding $30 billion, Corzine's budget proposes to make matters worse.[20]

When financial circumstances turn sour, states often find wasteful and redundant programs worthy of cuts. In order to meet constitutional balanced budget requirements (save Vermont), states cut general fund expenditures, rather than passing debt onto future generations or raising taxes that constrain economic growth and diminish competitiveness. For example, in the last two fiscal years (2004-2005), ten states managed to trim general fund spending, one (Oregon) by 12.8 percent. During this period New Jersey has averaged 7.45 percent in general fund increases.[21] The current budget does not seek to trim the fat, but add more.

One example is the budget request for the Office of Economic Growth. Most states see little need for such an office, and use low tax burdens and business friendly environments to attract potential employers. A public relations campaign might score political points, but history has shown more government does little to spur private sector prosperity and drive tax revenues. In terms of revenue growth, four states that have experienced some of the largest gains in the nation still lack a state income tax (Alaska, Wyoming, Nevada, and Florida).[22] Taxpayers of New Jersey would likely opt to keep the money that would be spent on this new office to help offset skyrocketing property taxes, which have risen an average of $1,300 in the past four years.[23] This new office might not be the driving force behind the state's budget growth, but health care and pension liabilities are, and the current request does little to address these looming problems.

In fact, many of the dedicated general fund expenditures in the current proposed budget do not obviate future tax increases or massive borrowing. The Department of Children and Family Services will see a 7 percent jump, and the Department of Human Services is estimated to grow 53 percent! The top five (in total spending) dedicated general fund expenditures will see record increases in the FY 2007 budget. The Department of Human Services (first), Department of the Treasury (second), Department of Transportation (third), Department of Law and Public Safety (fourth), and the Department of Health and Senior Services (fifth) will see a combined jump of 17.4 percent from the last fiscal year. These five departments would devour 84 percent of dedicated funds if the Governor's budget is adopted.[24]

Governor Corzine cannot honestly talk about fiscal discipline unless mandatory and dedicated funds are addressed with substantive overhauls that inject some cost control measures. Medicaid for example, which represents approximately 20 percent of New Jersey's budget, is one of several programs that will continue to squeeze state finances if not reformed.[25] Across the nation, state spending on Medicaid has increased from $67 billion in 1995 to $139 billion in 2005 (a 104 percent increase).[26] Holding the line on the Newark Museum ($2.7 million decrease) or the Paper Mill Playhouse ($1 million decrease) might appease some, but the main budget drivers will continue to fuel runaway spending.[27] And if spending cannot be constrained, politicians will use the tired rhetoric of "selective revenue enhancements" to pay their overdue bills.

The cornerstone of Governor Corzine's tax proposal is a 16 percent sales tax increase (to a statutory rate of 7 percent), which is projected to bring in $1.1 billion in new annual revenue.[28] The new 7 percent rate would comprise the second highest state-level sales tax in the U.S.[29] Sales taxes, of course, are considered to be highly regressive because they fall proportionally harder on middle-to-low income earners. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, citizens earning approximately $25,000 consume about 112 percent of their income. Food alone represents about 16 percent of total income. Someone earning over $118,000, by contrast, spends just 8 percent on food and consumes 65 percent of all income.[30] Furthermore, the bottom 40 percent of earners in New Jersey already pay between 5.2 and 7.2 percent of total income to New Jersey through sales and excise taxes, compared to 0.9 percent for the wealthiest 1 percent.[31] A sales tax hike will do little to enhance the "progressivity" in the Tax Code that Governor Corzine claims to be seeking. It appears as though tax increases are now option number one in New Jersey, rather than a "last resort."

As if this weren't enough, the Governor has also proposed a number of troubling "revenue enhancements" that practically beg residents and businesses to pack their bags. His budget includes a 2.5 percent corporation business tax surcharge, a surcharge on luxury car registration, a new real estate transfer tax, and an increase in the tobacco tax, among other schemes.[32]

The real estate transfer levy ($17 million in the budget) is opposed by several public interest groups including the National Association of Realtors and the United Homeowners Coalition. A higher transfer tax would have a negative impact on economic development and is a highly unreliable revenue stream given the volatility of the housing market. Once selling cools and transfer revenues fail to meet projections, policymakers could raise the rate to more punitive levels or search for other tax increases.

Tax and Spending Increases in Perspective
If enacted, Governor Corzine's $1.8 billion plan would be one of the largest tax increases in state history, amounting to about 6 percent of the estimated FY 2007 budget. To put this in perspective, if President Bush had called for such an increase on the national level, it would total about $162 billion. Since the U.S. income tax is "only" expected to bring in $998 billion this year, and total revenue will approach $2.3 trillion, this would be a radical step with dire economic consequences for the nation.[33]

At a time when New Jersey's business climate is already one of the worst in the U.S., population growth in the state is starting to stagnate, and some state revenue sources have unexpectedly declined during a period of robust economic expansion, New Jersey taxpayers can ill-afford a sixth consecutive year of tax and fee increases. In Governor Corzine's opening budget address he charged, "If you don't like what I've proposed, then give me an alternative that is as far-reaching and as fair."[34] Policy prescriptions for limited government and restrained spending have been employed for decades, but Mr. Corzine might want to follow the example of Colorado, a state that limits budget increases to population growth plus inflation.

Population growth in New Jersey has not exceeded 0.8 percent since 1995 and inflation has remained relatively tame. If yearly spending would have increased only at the rate of these two indicators since FY 1995, state expenditures would be approximately $42 billion, or about $8 billion less than current projections.[35] This difference amounts to a savings of over $900 per capita, which could have been (preferably) either refunded to taxpayers or used to address the state's structural deficit and unfunded liabilities. Other policy initiatives that could lighten future taxpayer burdens include modernizing the state government's retirement system by switching from a defined-benefit plan that is burdened by demographic constraints, to a defined-contribution arrangement. Finally, New Jersey could adopt some of the Medicaid reforms taking place in South Carolina and Tennessee, where the government might offer Health Savings Accounts and increased portability rather than the blanket coverage that has strained state and federal finances for years.

Conclusion: Trenton Must Reject Higher Taxes
After the release of the Governor's budget, one observer joked, "There are no immediate plans to tax the air we breathe—not this year, at least."[36] The proposal does not include plans to tax oxygen and nitrogen, but it does tax the water residents drink. An additional 4-cent surcharge per 1,000 gallons is just another sad example of the extent to which some policymakers will reach to capture the maximum amount of revenue while avoiding political accountability.[37] Garden State taxpayers have forked over enough money to the state in the past few years and double-digit budget increases won't deliver relief from this oppressive climate. Based on the Governor's previous remarks and business background, he is well aware of the impact of taxation and government spending, yet his rhetoric is not reflected in the budget. If he thinks simply adding to New Jersey's already high tax burden will drive economic growth and fill the coffers, why is the state still mired in deficits after soaking residents for $3 billion in additional taxes? New Jersey government has played the role of tax-hiker well over the past few years. After billions of dollars in higher taxes and increased debt, perhaps it is time to audition for a different part, one in which elected officials will learn the lines of fiscal discipline.

About the Author
Sam Batkins is Deputy Press Secretary for the National Taxpayers Union Foundation, the research arm of the 350,000-member National Taxpayers Union, a non-partisan citizen group founded in 1969.

ilovenj
02-13-2007, 04:12 PM
If your going to post, Post something Current

http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/states/new_jersey/16670699.htm


Real tax relief or election ploy?Many doubt there will be a permanent fix, given the state's spotty history of promises and follow-through.
By Jennifer Moroz and Elisa Ung
Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Haven't we been here before?

It's an election year in New Jersey and state lawmakers are offering up a property tax-relief package - one that would dole out an average of $1,051 to 1.9 million households this year.

Authors of the plan, which Gov. Corzine is expected to sign into law, insist this is the real thing: meaningful, long-lasting reform.

But critics swear the program is just another vote-getting gimmick that cannot be sustained over time. And recent history, it seems, is on their side.

Property-tax relief programs have been around for years, after all, and help for homeowners has ebbed and flowed.

In 1999, Gov. Christie Whitman introduced her popular NJ Saver Program, which doled out rebate checks averaging $120 that year and $240 the following year.

In 2001, acting Gov. Donald T. DiFrancesco signed a bill that accelerated the program, doubling most payouts to $500.

In 2003, under Gov. Jim McGreevey, the checks dropped to $250. But the next year, McGreevey boosted the rebates again, giving families up to $800 with help from proceeds from a new "millionaire's tax."

In 2005, Senate President Richard J. Codey - then acting governor - said the state's rocky finances could not support such generosity. So although senior citizens were allowed to keep their rebates - up to $1,200 - others saw their tax breaks slashed by more than half, to between $200 and $350.

Now Democratic leaders are proposing jacking up relief levels again as part of a six-month drive to overhaul the country's highest property taxes. Under the proposal, seniors would receive no less relief than they do now, while other households making up to $250,000 would get tax breaks ranging from 10 percent to 20 percent.

Given the past, many have a hard time believing the plan will survive into the future.

"I don't think anybody would project they would get the same [relief] next year," said Ingrid Reed, director of the Eagleton Center for Politics at Rutgers University. "I don't think people believe this is the beginning of routine, sustained commitment from the state. I think the trust needs to be built."

But this time, the plan's backers insist, the relief will stick.

A special provision would help make sure tax increases don't cancel out the relief, either, they say. Under that provision, towns, counties and school districts could not raise property taxes more than 4 percent a year.

Codey said homeowners could count on the tax relief for years to come "unless you have a 9/11, something like that."

What sets this plan apart from years past, Codey said, is the tax cap, which he acknowledged would take a few years to take full effect, but which he said "hopefully will work."

But critics of the plan say lawmakers have allowed local officials to exempt too many costs from the cap. As a result, they say, property taxes, which have been going up by 7 percent in recent years, will continue to rise.

Meanwhile, skeptics fear, the relief could dry up again.

Legislative leaders have proposed funding the $2.3 billion plan this year with more than $1 billion the state currently uses to fund rebate checks, plus proceeds from last year's penny sales-tax hike. Voters last year dedicated half of those new sales-tax proceeds - about $700 million a year - to property-tax relief, and for this year only, lawmakers have two years' worth of that money at their disposal.

In future years, they will have to find hundreds of millions of dollars to fully fund the tax-relief program.

But the fact that there is some money constitutionally earmarked for relief already sets this property-tax effort apart from others, said Assembly Speaker Joseph Roberts (D., Camden).

"We're not saying, 'Take our word for it.' We are saying that we have guaranteed it," he said.

Roberts hopes to dedicate another half-penny of the sales tax to help fund the relief in future years. But even if voters don't make that happen, he said, legislators would find a way to fund the program, which he estimated would be "about $400 million short."

"That is a little more than 1 percent of the state budget," he said. "It's a large number, but in the context of the state budget, it's not an insurmountable problem."

Legislative leaders and Corzine have suggested the state could unload a big chunk of debt - and free up billions it now pays in interest to help fund initiatives such as tax relief - by selling or leasing some of its money-making assets, such as the lottery and three toll roads.

But "asset monetization," which Corzine is now studying, has met with a lot of opposition from skeptics who worry that, among other things, fee levels would rise and service levels would drop under a private operator.

Corzine, who once questioned whether the tax-relief program could be sustained, now believes it could be - with the help of the cap, concessions he hopes to get from public employee unions on pensions and benefits, and savings uncovered by a newly established state comptroller.

Last week, Corzine called the Legislature's approval of the relief plan "a turning point with regard to reform."

But even if legislators do find the money to fund the relief in the long term, "it's still not property-tax reform," insists William Schluter, a former GOP state senator who advocates shifting more of the burden onto the income tax.

When legislators realized their efforts to reduce property taxes weren't working, Schluter said, they passed something "to get them through the next election."

Joshua Berry, chair of South Jersey Citizens for Property Tax Reform, which monitored the effort, agreed, calling the relief "a warmed-over rebate."

Added the engineer from Blackwood: "I'm afraid the leaders of the Legislature will pass this, the governor will sign this, and they'll wash their hands and say they're done, and in two years, we'll be back in the same position."

Trenton's Property-Tax Overhaul Effort Tax-Credit Plan Highlights

This is what came out of a six-month effort to reform America's highest property taxes.

On Gov. Corzine's desk

• The major piece of the effort, a bill creating a 20 percent property-tax credit for most households and a 4 percent cap on local tax increases.

• A bill establishing a state comptroller who would investigate and audit governments. The office could cost the state up to $9 million annually, and critics say its power has been watered down; Corzine says it will have strong authority to root out waste, thus eventually saving millions.

• A bill that would require elected or appointed officials who are convicted of a crime to forfeit their retirement benefits from the job in which the offense was committed.

• A bill that would create a panel to recommend town mergers subject to voter approval; lawmakers removed a provision that would have withheld some aid to towns who voted down the mergers.

• A bill that would establish accountability measures for schools, such as restrictions on travel expenses.

In the Legislature

• A bill giving county superintendents authority to eliminate nonoperating school districts and recommend mergers among local districts subject to voter approval; it also eliminates some barriers to consolidation and requires user-friendly budgets. Senate passed, Assembly expected to pass.

• A bill making some changes to pensions and benefits for elected and appointed officials. Senate passed, Assembly expected to pass.

Signed into law

• An elimination of some school mandates viewed as expensive or unnecessary.

• An elimination of inactive commissions and boards.

Dead or postponed

• A new school funding formula that was to have directed more money to middle-class suburban districts. Corzine has pledged to raise those schools' funding anyway, but he said the formula cannot be ready in time for this school year.

• A proposed pilot program that would have created a countywide school district to study whether it would lower school costs. Gloucester County lawmakers killed the bill after around 3,000 people protested it at a Washington Township school board meeting.

• A ban on holding more than one elected office, exempting the Legislature's 19 current dual office-holders. The Senate and Assembly disagree over when it should take effect, but legislative leaders and Corzine say it is still a priority.

• Changes in unionized public-worker pensions and benefits, including prohibiting employees from earning pension credits for more than one job, requiring them to forfeit their pension if convicted of abusing their office, and eliminating a sick leave and injury program. Corzine ordered lawmakers to pull these out of the bills, saying he wanted to handle them in union negotiations.

• Moving fire district and school board elections to November to increase voter turnout and save costs. The Senate threw that out of a consolidation bill.

• A bill that would have eventually consolidated property assessment on the county level, eliminating municipal assessors. It did not get enough legislative support.

JerseyDevil
02-13-2007, 04:43 PM
If your going to post, Post something Current

I'm sorry - but I can post whatever I wish to post. That being said, the article I posted contradicts everything you have been saying about how great the democrats have been ruling NJ. Also, an article that is less than a year old talking about the problems in NJ government is still VERY relevant. The thing is - Corzine ended up doing exactly what the article says he shouldn't have done. The so-called property tax reduction is a joke. As articles form the Star Ledger pointed out - only in Trenton would going back to what property taxes were in 2004 be called progress. :roll: The legislature needs to go, the governor needs to go and NJ needs a Constitutional Convention to keep New Jersey's GOVERNMENT and POLITICIANS in check and give control back to the CITIZENS of New Jersey.

ilovenj
02-13-2007, 09:16 PM
Are you going to vote Democrat this year or are you going to let the people of N.J. down?

Impeach Corzine
02-13-2007, 09:33 PM
JerseyDevil,
There is no talking with ilovenj, he has drank from the Jon "Jim Jones" Corzine cup of gravy train. Hey ilovenj, I hope you enjoyed the Kool-Aid that you have been drinking for years because it will be going away soon once the republicans sweep out the state legislature. Even if the Democratic Blob stays in control, they will probably come up with a new way to tax your Kool-Aid.

We will see how tomorrow goes in federal court and watch the Trenton Blob squirm as Christie beats the corruption out of them.

ilovenj
02-13-2007, 11:43 PM
I heard a great rumor and I hope it comes true. There is a chance that Mr. Corzine will lease the Parkway and Turnpike to raise $30 billion dollars. People in N.J. may feel that we will lose revenues from the tollbooths and the EZ pass system. Get ready to rub your Goosebumps down, Mr. Corzine will help the N.J. economy even more when he puts tollbooths on Route 78,287,440,80 and I hope Route 1. This way, N.J. gets the billions it needs and can still collect toll revenues. I'm happy I can still use my EZ pass. Keep your fingers crossed, its only a rumor.


Remember in November, Vote Democrat!!!

Impeach Corzine
02-14-2007, 07:44 AM
A rumor... where have you been.

I wanted to know myself just who is pushing the idea of turning over the state’s toll roads to private investors, after reading a report in Mother Jones magazine showing finance giant Goldman-Sachs, Gov. Jon Corzine’s old company, is pushing the issue of leasing American toll roads. Legislators on both sides of the aisle have expressed serious reservations about this proposal. With both Republicans and Democrats questioning whether this is a wise move it has been somewhat of a mystery as to why the idea of selling of this critical state asset has become so popular within the Corzine administration. But the mystery may now be solved.

The report in Mother Jones magazine found that Goldman Sachs has set up an infrastructure investment arm, and has been working closely with Australian-owned Macquarie Infrastructure Group (MIG) and the Spanish construction firm Cintra to leverage lease deals for public roads and building projects for public highways. The article describes efforts by Goldman Sachs officials to convince government officials around the country of the benefits of privatizing public roads. But the article also points out that Goldman Sachs is playing more than one side of the transaction. On one end, Goldman Sachs is advising government entities how to proceed with the transaction, the investment firm is also working in tandem with its friends at MIG and Cintra. On the another side, an account has created by Goldman Sachs to funnel investors’ money into an investment fund with the sole purpose of investing in highway infrastructure projects. More than $3 billion has already been accumulated into the account.

New Jersey is not alone in its exploration of toll road leases to aid in their hunt for more money. In Pennsylvania, Gov. Ed Rendell is exploring the idea of leasing the Pennsylvania Turnpike. In Delaware, Gov. Ruth Ann Miner is exploring leasing the Delaware Turnpike. In New York, former Gov. George Patacki got the discussion rolling to privatize the New York Thruway before he left office last month. The new governor, Elliot Spitzer won the election on a platform of eliminating all tolls on the thruway. Ohio, Kansas and other states could also be headed in the same direction.

To-date, Goldman Sachs has been hired by four government entities to advise them on how to proceed with privatizing highways. In the past five years, Goldman Sachs has helped turn over several highways from state-owned to privately run, including the 99-year lease deal of the 7.8-mile Chicago Skyway in 2005.

Most lawmakers have argued that any deal that would sign over the state’s road roads to private investors needs to come with much needed due diligence. There doesn’t seem to be a lot of support for this proposal coming from either party in the legislature right now. And if the idea is being pushed by the Governor’s old colleagues on Wall Street, maybe he should consider a second opinion, one not so ‘invested’ in the outcome.

NJPRIDE
02-14-2007, 10:23 AM
Impeach Corzine, Its good to have someone like you and J.D. pointing out the facts. What this Governor and his Democratic cronies are trying to get away with in this state is a crime! I for one pay attention to N.J. news and know these people must be run out of Trenton like we ran the Hessian's out in 1776! But we must also warn the Republicans that they will not get away with any of this either! I cant wait until Mr. Christi throws the book at the legislator! :D You gotta like that Dem. from Camden County who is history. Just another Democrat in this state who thought the people were dumb. I do not support any toll roads in our state being run by anyone but us! We must let Corzine know he does not have our permission to go through with this, the hospital bed tax or any new tax! In almost any other state my wife and I would be able to afford to buy a house but here our politicians will not give us that opportunity. As I pointed out earlier I will be voting Republican in November!

MITHRANDIR
02-14-2007, 10:34 AM
Impeach Corzine, Its good to have someone like you and J.D. pointing out the facts.

While it is good to some some people pointing out the facts, it is more important for people to act accordingly.

If people see wrong doing by our elected officials, then we, the public, need to vote them out at the next election (at the latest).

We cannot continue to vote people into office that do not represent the best interests of NJ as a whole. (Regardless if this may mean some financial discomfort for us individually.)

If our elected officials consistently work for the best interests of NJ then we will all benefit in the long run.

ilovenj,

It is difficult for me to always know whether you are serious in what you write or if you are trying to get peoples attention. (One problem with the Internet. Can not see inflection in peoples voices to clue me in the seriousness of what people are saying.)

As long as people are aware of the facts, I am hopeful that they will act appropriately.

ilovenj
02-16-2007, 01:50 PM
Mr. Corzine will most likely lease the N.J. Turnpike. This means we get $30 billion dollars to pay off our state debt. Its done, N.J., Thanks to Mr.Corzine, N.J. will be debt free. Only a Democrat could acheave this.

Marianita
02-18-2007, 10:23 AM
Corzine has already proven himself by taxing everything except the air we breathe. Before we count on the tolls being leased we need to see it happen and when and if it does we need to see what is done with the money. Marianita

ilovenj
02-19-2007, 11:51 AM
This Thursday, Mr. Corzine will make his Budget speech. Im sure he will tell us how strong N.J. is, thanks to his needed tax increases. Im sure we in N.J. will be happy and we get a rebate on our property tax. I cant wait until November when the Democrats win the offices they hold and secure N.J. for a rock solid future.

Marianita
02-19-2007, 12:26 PM
Hi ilovenj, These posts are just too funny. I will let you know if my son is paying $6000.00 a year in taxes when he buys his house. :lmao:

ilovenj
02-19-2007, 01:42 PM
Let your son know that his $6000 a year will contribute in keeping N.J. strong and maintain a healthy economy. To live in N.J., he is getting a good deal.


Democrats in N.J. in 2008

Marianita
02-19-2007, 04:50 PM
Hi ilovenj, I will let him know. I am sure he will be pleased to know he is contributing to a healthy economy.:lmao:

ilovenj
02-19-2007, 06:46 PM
We in N.J. should endorse Jon Corzine for President. He has fixed the problems of N.J. and if he was President, He could clean up Bushes mess in less then a year. Bush, A republican has done nothing move America forward. He is only focused on Iraq and spending billions of dollars and left Katrina in the forgotten zone. Mr. Corzine will clean up the Republican corruption and bring America to a strong future. Lets in N.J. help clean up the American corruption. Republicans!!

JerseyDevil
02-19-2007, 07:07 PM
We in N.J. should endorse Jon Corzine for President. He has fixed the problems of N.J. and if he was President, He could clean up Bushes mess in less then a year. Bush, A republican has done nothing move America forward. He is only focused on Iraq and spending billions of dollars and left Katrina in the forgotten zone. Mr. Corzine will clean up the Republican corruption and bring America to a strong future. Lets in N.J. help clean up the American corruption. Republicans!!
He can't even clean up the corruption of the Democrats in NJ - I seriously doubt he would be able to do anything about Republicans. As for fixing the problems of NJ - he hasn't done anything yet other than make speeches and increase the budget by a billion dollars.

Also, as I told you - if you wish to talk about national issues - start a thread in the General Discussion forum.

ilovenj
02-19-2007, 07:20 PM
I only mentioned " national issues" because of Mr. Corzine. I do not want to start another topic as N.J. politics is all I want to discuss. The Democrats have done so much for N.J. and you still complain. If your proud to be N.J., then be proud to pay the taxes to support your claim. Did you vote for Mr. Corzine? You know you did. I cant wait until the Turnpike is leased out. Im hoping the new owners will fix the Merger at exit 8. I hope they will add more lanes down south. I hope they dont continue to close the cars only lane all the time. When they lease the Turnpike, I hope they fire out the lazy rude people that work for them.

JerseyDevil
02-19-2007, 08:19 PM
I only mentioned " national issues" because of Mr. Corzine. I do not want to start another topic as N.J. politics is all I want to discuss. The Democrats have done so much for N.J. and you still complain. If your proud to be N.J., then be proud to pay the taxes to support your claim. Did you vote for Mr. Corzine? You know you did. I cant wait until the Turnpike is leased out. Im hoping the new owners will fix the Merger at exit 8. I hope they will add more lanes down south. I hope they dont continue to close the cars only lane all the time. When they lease the Turnpike, I hope they fire out the lazy rude people that work for them.
Believe me - I did NOT vote for Corzine. Based on his performance so far - I'm very glad I didn't. I wish more New Jerseyans would have voted against him. He didn't do anything for NJ while in the Senate and he hasn't done anything for NJ while governor. Of course NY will love him because he supports the second Hudson Rail tunnel while will just export New Jersey jobs to NY and subsidize their economy. :roll:

Marianita
02-19-2007, 09:06 PM
Hi ilovenj, It seems to me that the toll booths can be leased out but would the money be used in an appropriate manner? I am sure the workers have a good reason for being rude as they work in all kinds of weather and collect money all day. That's it as far I can see. But it is an important job as it needs to be done. By the way, did you watch that youtube clip about Corzine? You really should. Marianita

davegering
02-20-2007, 07:43 AM
I notice Ilovenj does not list what part of the stae he or she lives in I am curious wheter he lives in Jersey or not. As for Corzine running for President i wish he would so we can get him the h*** out of our state.

ilovenj
02-20-2007, 09:59 AM
OK, I will come clean. I'm being a wise ass. I'm speaking for the stupid voters who supports Democrats. We had Florio, McGreevy and the people say, we want more so we voted Corzine in. Corzine has killed the moral of N.J. Houses are for sale everywhere and people avoid his new taxes.Its so easy to cross the border to the next state to buy things and services. This may explain why he is still short on the budget. But the stupid people of N.J. keep voting Democrat and I was speaking for their stupidity. Corzine thinks he helps the unions, how buy raising all taxes and driving people to Wal-Mart. He thinks he helps the Unions, but he helps raise Wal-Mart stocks. I avoid Union stores, these uneducated people want to be a drone to vote Democrat, then get laid off when tax paying people have to avoid union stores to save money. This effects shipping and manufacturing. But Corzine's actions supports non union., well I'm leaving N.J. as well because its to disgusting to live here with all these stupid people. The people you all thought I was, what I wrote was stupid, but the people of N.J. live by what I wrote. They love Democrats. I hope the Democrat lovers love Foreclosures. Thanks to Corzine. Marianita, Are you as ignorant as I was writing? Why would you or your son want this life style? You love traffic? Taxes everywhere? If the Turnpike gets leased, at least that union can feel the effects of their decision of electing Corzine

JerseyDevil
02-20-2007, 03:40 PM
OK, I will come clean. I'm being a wise ass. I'm speaking for the stupid voters who supports Democrats. We had Florio, McGreevy and the people say, we want more so we voted Corzine in. Corzine has killed the moral of N.J. Houses are for sale everywhere and people avoid his new taxes.Its so easy to cross the border to the next state to buy things and services. This may explain why he is still short on the budget. But the stupid people of N.J. keep voting Democrat and I was speaking for their stupidity.

I figured this was what you had to be doing. I'm glad you came clean finally. I agree with you fully though. New Jerseyans seem to be blind. I'm not sure what it will take to get the electorate to wake up and demand change.


Corzine thinks he helps the unions, how buy raising all taxes and driving people to Wal-Mart. He thinks he helps the Unions, but he helps raise Wal-Mart stocks. I avoid Union stores, these uneducated people want to be a drone to vote Democrat, then get laid off when tax paying people have to avoid union stores to save money. This effects shipping and manufacturing. But Corzine's actions supports non union., well I'm leaving N.J. as well because its to disgusting to live here with all these stupid people.

Not all of us are drones though. How can we make New Jersey a better place and take the state back from the self serving politicians and unions if people like you leave? What I find ironic is that democrats ***** and moan about the high taxes and leave the state, such as my cousin's family, but yet they continue to vote for the same people that are taxing us to death. I will live in New Jersey, I love New Jersey, but I will continue to fight for change in our government.


The people you all thought I was, what I wrote was stupid, but the people of N.J. live by what I wrote. They love Democrats. I hope the Democrat lovers love Foreclosures. Thanks to Corzine. Marianita, Are you as ignorant as I was writing? Why would you or your son want this life style? You love traffic? Taxes everywhere? If the Turnpike gets leased, at least that union can feel the effects of their decision of electing Corzine
The Republicans have to start making a stand or at least someone has to start taking a stand. What is causing traffic in New Jersey? It's the sprawl. Instead of developing our cities and bringing people bakc to our cities, politicians would rather build another roadway through the Princeton Area, or eat away at the Pine Barrens with developments. If we want change we have to make our voices heard. The question is how when we have no broadcast media - which the majority of people get their news from - to keep Trenton in check. ILoveNJ - what are your suggestions - besides just packing up your bags and leaving?

[edit]
BTW - if Sharpe James gets re-elected into the legislature with all the scandals which have been revealed after he left the mayors office in Newark - then there is serious serious problems in northeastern New Jersey and hence very serious problems for the future of New Jersey.

Marianita
02-20-2007, 10:46 PM
Hi ilovenj, I am not ignorant at all. My son had a job offer that was lucrative to say the least only he had to relocate to New Jersey. It has turned out to be a positive move and he and his family are very happy there. Remember too that they are young enough to adjust to a drastic change from Southern Calif to New Jersey.
As for me I absolutely love the place but in part that is due to the success of my son.
The traffic is a bit much there and those circles are packed with cars. But we have our traffic jams here too. That is one reason I prefer living in this part of California as opposed LA county. Also I see New Jersey as having a better quality of life inspite of the tax situation. And there are places I love to go that I cannot even hope to find here. So there you have it.
As for Corzine taxing everything and in general not keeping his promises he can be removed. It happened here with a govenor. He was removed from office a few years ago. I sort of think he will not be re-elected anyway. marianita

ilovenj
02-21-2007, 01:19 AM
I get angry because only unions vote and they can have pension cuts and yet will vote Democrat because union members are drones. I cant fight Corzine, but I can protest. I fully boycott Union stores and I shop at Wal-Marts, Wegmens and BJ's. Unions have Corzine's Ass for breakfast every morning, but they will get no financial support from me. Unions picket at Wegmens, but when they need a plumber, do they go to the union hall? Nope, they look for a Mexican.


This was a Corzine truth.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56dAozVcny4

ilovenj
02-22-2007, 12:35 AM
www.impeachcorzine.com

ilovenj
02-22-2007, 11:10 AM
As usual, He is always 100% talk and 0% action.

JerseyDevil
02-22-2007, 06:42 PM
Well the Corzine Budget address was given today. Of course many of the democrats are trumpeting how there are "no new taxes" in the budget. That's great - considering he raised taxes by 17% last year. :roll: I guess they hope New Jerseyans will forget that little fact. Contrary many politicians belief - not all New Jerseyans suffer from short term memory loss. Belief it or not - many of us can remember what was promised last year and what we ended up with. :mad:

If you wish to watch the budget address - you can see it online at NJN - http://www.njn.net/newspublicaffairs/coverage/budgetmessage07.html

JerseyDevil
02-23-2007, 03:02 AM
Here is the front page article from the Star Ledger covering the Corzine Budget.

I find this very ironic where Corzine said - ‘‘We have tough choices coming, and the public needs to trust that we are working for them — not ourselves, not our friends, not for anyone else.’’ I guess that doesn't include him protecting his union buddies. :roll: Just another example of him speaking out of two sides of his mouth. :mad:



Think outside budget box, Corzine asks
Governor’s annual address champions asset sell-off and change in course
BY ROBERT SCHWANEBERG AND JOE DONOHUE
STAR-LEDGER STAFF

Proposing a $33 billion state budget with no new taxes, Gov. Jon Corzine yesterday issued dual challenges to lawmakers: End the ‘‘midnight spending sprees’’ of budgets past and restructure the state’s ‘‘crushing debt burden,’’ even if it requires selling assets such as the Turnpike or Lottery.

‘‘We must break with the patterns of the past,’’ Corzine told a joint session of the Legislature. In the short term, he demanded a more open process so the public can clearly see how the budget the Legislature adopts by the June 30 deadline compares to the one he proposed yesterday.

But the major thrust of Corzine’s speech was aimed at persuading a skeptical Legislature and public to consider the wisdom of cashing in state assets, such as toll roads or the Lottery, to pay off debt and free up revenues for new investments and programs.

Without such outside-the-box thinking, the former Wall Street wizard told lawmakers, the state has already doomed itself to a dismal future.

‘‘We can continue struggling every year, scraping by with duct tape and baling wire, and pulling together no-frill, investment-free budgets,’’ Corzine said. ‘‘Or we can change course.’’

Left unsaid, but plainly understood, was the legal and political cloud hanging over the budget-making process. U.S. Attorney Christopher Christie has subpoenaed legislative records relating to ‘‘Christmas tree’’ items — pet projects that lawmakers tuck into the budget.

A stalemate last year between Corzine and lawmakers over whether to increase the sales tax triggered an unprecedented week-long shutdown of state government. It was broken only after an all-night session in which lawmakers hung $378 million of baubles on the Christmas tree; $33 million of that was removed by Corzine.

This year, Corzine is demanding better. He said the budget should be available to the public a week before it goes to a final legislative vote, and the governor should have another three days to review it before signing it. He also called on the Treasury to prepare a before-and-after comparison of spending plans.

‘‘We need to build greater public confidence in the actions of government, especially when it comes to transparency and accountability of the purse strings,’’ Corzine said. ‘‘We have tough choices coming, and the public needs to trust that we are working for them — not ourselves, not our friends, not for anyone else.’’

Along with that dose of castor oil, Corzine presented a budget much more palatable to lawmakers in an election year than his first budget a year ago, with its draconian spending cuts and penny-on-the-dollar sales tax increase. Last year’s address was interrupted by applause just three times; Corzine’s 34-minute speech yesterday got 17 ovations.

Corzine called his new budget the first in six years ‘‘with no new taxes or tax increases.’’ With an expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit program, it effectively cuts income taxes ‘‘for almost 300,000 working families,’’ the governor said.

He said it ‘‘provides the largest increase in direct property tax relief in New Jersey history’’ — a $2.2 billion program that will give most homeowners a credit of up to 20 percent against their property tax bills. Indirectly, he added, the budget holds down property taxes by providing ‘‘the first real increase in school and municipal aid in a number of years’’ — $580 million more for schools and an across-the-board 2 percent increase for towns.

‘‘First and foremost, this is a property tax relief budget,’’ Corzine said.

Republicans cautioned that a detailed budget proposal has yet to be released, and could change dramatically by the time it is finalized in June.

‘‘This budget battle is far from over,’’ said Assemblyman Richard Merkt (R-Morris). ‘‘We’re quite certain that when all is said and done, this budget will include a host of hidden tax and fee increases.’’

With all 40 Senate and 80 Assembly seats up for election this fall, Democrats who rule both houses were delighted to have Corzine’s budget as a platform on which to run.

‘‘The governor’s budget proposal is a win-win-win for taxpayers, municipalities and schools alike,’’ said Assemblyman John Burzichelli (D-Gloucester).

Assembly woman Linda Greenstein (D-Middlesex) said, ‘‘For our seniors, tenants, and working families, this budget provides record levels of relief without the need for higher taxes, new taxes, or fiscal gimmicks.’’

Corzine quickly moved on to a bleak vision of New Jersey’s future if it proceeds on its current course. It was a speech designed to box lawmakers in.

The governor repeated the state’s well-known challenges: Debt service eats up $2.7 billion of this budget. In five years it is projected to consume $3.4 billion. Unfunded pension obligations are nearly $25 billion and the future tab for health care ‘‘approaches an incredible $80 billion,’’ Corzine said.

He recited a litany of goals — universal pre-kindergarten, new schools, expanded colleges, mass transit, reclaimed brownfields, open space, compensation for Highlands farmers — always ending with the refrain: ‘‘Where are the resources?’’

‘‘We all have a vision for a brighter New Jersey,’’ he said, ‘‘but today we can’t afford the investments to make our vision a reality.’’

He dismissed ‘‘unattractive options’’ such as raising taxes — saying they would ‘‘erode New Jersey’s competitiveness and make our state less affordable’’ — or layoffs. To save $500 million, he said, ‘‘we would need to lay off 10,000 workers. You get the math.’’

Corzine said the one viable option — one his administration is already exploring — is ‘‘asset monetization,’’ meaning leasing or selling ‘‘the Turnpike, the Lottery, naming rights, air rights or whatever.’’

‘‘Monetization could free up as much as a billion dollars or more in every year’s state budget — long into the future,’’ Corzine said. ‘‘To take this option off the table is to accept some combination of hand-to-mouth budgets without capital or social investments.’’

His pitch drew mixed reactions from lawmakers.

‘‘I’m more than a lot skeptical of selling these assets,’’ said Sen. Joseph Kyrillos (R-Monmouth).

Senate President Richard Codey (D-Essex) enthusiastically endorsed Corzine’s ideas.

‘‘I wanted to do it when I was governor. I didn’t have enough time,’’ Codey said. ‘‘I’m for: Let’s get the dough.’’

Senate Minority Leader Leonard Lance (R-Hunterdon) said, ‘‘Under no circumstances should we sell any state asset except if every penny of such a sale were to go to pay down state debt.’’

Some in both parties re-mained dead set against a Turnpike sale.

‘‘We believe everything you can do to turn a profit by selling byists to disclose their efforts to influence the budget. Codey also has vowed that, at least in the Senate, lawmakers will have to disclose their role in adding spending items.

Assembly Speaker Joseph Roberts (D-Camden) said the goal should be to make lawmakers’ actions more visible, not curtail them.

‘‘Members of the Legislature have the right and frankly an oblithe Turnpike to a private entity you can do in-house,’’ said Assemblyman Lou Manzo (D-Hudson).

Assembly Minority Leader Alex DeCroce (R-Morris) said, ‘‘I don’t know anybody in their right mind that would want to give up the people’s asset.’’

Later yesterday, the Senate unanimously passed a bill (S2505) by Codey requiring lobgation to fight for projects that matter to their district and to fight for projects that they think matter to the state of New Jersey,’’ Roberts said. ‘‘If they have to do that out in the open, with their name on the dotted line taking full responsibility for what they propose, frankly they should be proud to do that.’’

JerseyDevil
02-23-2007, 04:07 AM
Here is another example why in November New Jersey needs a COMPLETELY new legislature. Any senator or legislator who stands in the way of IMMEDIATELY eliminating dual office holdings should be forced out by the voters! We, as citizens of New Jersey, should be electing people who have the best interest of the state in mind - not people who just want to line their pockets and be lifetime politicians! :mad:



Corzine talks the reform talk as legislators walk . . . away
BY DUNSTAN McNICHOL STAR-LEDGER STAFF

Talk of reform filled the air in Trenton yesterday, but votes for actual reform proved harder to find.

In the morning, Gov. Jon Corzine told lawmakers to end dual office-holding ‘‘now,’’ saying the practice ‘‘is an obstacle to achieving the common good we all desire.’’

By the afternoon, both the Senate and Assembly declined to vote on proposals to end dual officeholding, the practice that allows lawmakers and other elected officials to hold more than one elected post simultaneously.

Legislative leaders promised the ban will be passed — but not until after primary elections this June, when the measure will not affect the ambitions of the 20 state lawmakers who currently hold more than one elective office.

Corzine also used his budget address to push for an end to campaign finance abuses, such as soliciting campaign funds from government contractors — known as ‘‘pay-to-play’’ — and the practice of sending money from one local political organization to far-flung races, called ‘‘wheeling.’’

‘‘If we’re truly serious about restoring the public’s trust in government, about restoring their trust in us, it’s time to act on those reforms sooner rather than later,’’ Corzine said in his morning speech.

About three hours later, the state Senate adjourned without taking up a pending proposal to set up an experimental round of publicly funded ‘‘clean elections’’ this fall.

Without prompt action, state election officials told lawmakers at a hearing earlier this month, the experimental campaign financing system for a limited number of legislative races will not be able to be set up in time for this November’s campaigns. A similar experiment two years ago was widely viewed as ineffective and flawed.

‘‘I think as a caucus, we have to talk about it and determine where we want to go with it,’’ Senate President Richard Codey (D-Essex) said of the proposal (S2438), which already has passed the Assembly. ‘‘It’s still alive.’’

In the Senate, lawmakers did advance an unrelated set of reforms (S222) that would take aim at gifts that lawmakers take in from lobbyists and campaign contributions from public agencies. And top Democrats in both chambers promised the day for reform will soon be at hand.

‘‘The Assembly will be considering reform proposals that have been advanced as we go forward this year, ’’Assembly Majority Leader Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-Mercer) said as she introduced a motion to derail a Republican sponsored reform proposal yesterday. ‘‘I commit to all of you . . . This body will take action.’’

Those promises rang hollow among Republicans, who, as a minority in the Legislature, have pushed unsuccessfully for reform measures for years.

‘‘Didn’t Jim McGreevey promise us pay-to-play reform five years ago?’’ asked Sen. Tom Kean Jr. (RUnion). ‘‘We’re all still waiting. We can no longer afford to wait.’’

Assemblyman Kevin O’Toole (R-Essex), sponsor of an unsuccessful motion to consider a dualoffice-holding ban and other reforms yesterday, said he was troubled that Corzine, Codey and Assembly Speaker Joseph Roberts (D-Camden) all seem to be pursuing different versions of reform.

‘‘They all have their reform flags hoisted, but they’re not going in the same direction,’’ he said. ‘‘They need to find a port.’’


Here is an article from the day before...



Lawmakers get cold feet on dual office-holding ban
Differences between Senate, Assembly bills appear to put reform effort on back burner
BY DUNSTAN McNICHOL STAR-LEDGER STAFF

Dunstan McNichol may be reached at dmcnichol@starledger.com or (609) 989-0341.

Competing political agendas among state senators and Assembly members are about to derail efforts to prohibit elected officials in New Jersey from holding more than one office at a time.

Despite Gov. Jon Corzine’s attempts to make a ban on dual office-holding part of the Legislature’s property tax reform package, lawmakers do not plan to take final action on it when they meet to wrap up their reform agenda today.

Instead, the measure remains hung up between the Senate and Assembly, a victim of political gridlock.

‘‘I think we’ll probably end up by June solving this political dilemma,’’ said Senate President Richard Codey (D-Essex). ‘‘Obviously there is a slight dispute.’’

Codey has posted one version of the proposed ban on dual officeholding (S-18) for a vote in his chamber. But that measure is unpalatable in the Assembly largely because it would also apply to Assembly members with designs on unseating senators in this November’s elections.

‘‘Our plans are to not accept the bill,’’ said Joseph Donnelly, spokesman for Assembly Speaker Joseph Roberts (D-Camden).

The Assembly passed a ban on dual office-holding last month, as part of a broader package of pension and benefits reform (S-17). But the Assembly version would not have taken effect until February 2008 and therefore would not affect this November’s legislative races. The Senate removed the dual office-holding provisions from the pension reform bill before adopting it Feb. 5 and sending it back to the Assembly for today’s final consideration.

The Senate’s dual office-holding bill would immediately ban it for all newly elected officials. In practical terms, the Senate version would throw a wrench into the ambitions of Assembly members like Brian Stack (D-Hudson), who is considering a challenge to Sen. Bernard F. Kenny Jr. (D-Hudson).

Under the new terms of S-18, if Stack successfully challenged Kenny, he would have to give up his post as mayor of Union City, a position that has brought him tens of thousands of dollars in campaign funds and a sturdy power base.

Also benefiting from the tighter Senate rules would be Essex County Sen. Ron Rice (D-Essex), the former deputy mayor of Newark. A dual office-holding ban effective this year would protect Rice from potential challenges from allies of Newark Mayor Cory Booker who hold seats on the Newark City Council.

By postponing action on the dual office-holding ban until June, after this year’s primary elections, the Legislature would avoid affecting the political calculations of any current office-holders. Currently, 19 lawmakers have a second elected office.

Corzine, through a spokesman, said it continues to be his ‘‘preference’’ to get a dual office-holding ban as part of the tax reform package.

Heather Taylor, spokeswoman for the Citizens Campaign, an organization formed to promote government reform and citizen leadership, said the lack of action on dual office-holding is not acceptable.

‘‘When the Legislature fails to even act on the common sense notion that no one should be able to hold more than one elected office at the same time, it sends the message they are not serious about changing the broader culture of corruption,’’ Taylor said.

Among Democrats, who control the legislative agenda with majorities in both houses, 10 of 49 Assembly members hold second jobs as mayors or council members, while four of 22 Senate Democrats hold second offices.

At today’s session, the Assembly is scheduled to take final action on two measures that would conclude the Legislature’s work on property tax reform: a bill to set up a new countywide school official with veto power over local school spending (A-4) and one to limit retirement benefits for future elected and appointed officials and professional contractors (S-17).


The reason politicians like the dual office holding - beside the money of course - is that they establish their little fiefdoms. They create power bases which are very difficult to break into. In addition to the elimination of dual office holding - I would also recommend term limits for senators and legislators. We should not have for life politicians.

ilovenj
02-23-2007, 11:36 AM
Don't let Corzine fool you, He is in full support of the legislature. He puts on a show to make NJ feel confident. I judge him by his actions, not his words. His actions so far to raise and invent new taxes. Corzine is a modern day Satan. He makes speeches and performs no action except to hurt the people of N.J.

ilovenj
02-27-2007, 02:53 PM
Whats up with the tax rebates that Corzine promised?

PROOF: He is all words and no action.

ilovenj
03-01-2007, 12:33 PM
Property-tax bills soar
State releases 2006 figures
Home News Tribune Online 03/1/07
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON — The average property-tax bill in New Jersey topped more than $6,300 last year, a 7 percent hike over what was already the nation's highest property taxes, according to new state figures.



Even as Gov. Jon S. Corzine and legislators spent five months last year trying to cut property taxes, the average bill rose from $5,914 in 2005 to $6,331 last year, according to numbers compiled by the state Department of Community Affairs.

The 7 percent increase last year was a bit less than in 2005, when property taxes — used to fund most county, municipal and school operations in the state — increased 7.3 percent.

Taxes in Middlesex County followed suit, with municipalities showing various increases, some below the state average.

The average Garden State property-tax bill has increased from $4,961 in 2002, according to the DCA figures.

In all, $20.9 billion in property taxes were collected in 2006 in New Jersey, where property taxes are twice the national average.

Meanwhile Wednesday, the state released details of a 2 percent municipal-aid increase in Corzine's proposed 2008 state budget. It's the first proposed aid increase for municipalities in five years. The money is designed to help control property taxes.

"This 2 percent aid increase for municipalities indicates Gov. Corzine's strong commitment to providing property-tax relief for the citizens of New Jersey while continuing to work toward meaningful property-tax reform," DCA Commissioner Susan Bass Levin said.

The budget also includes a $2.3 billion plan to cut property taxes by 20 percent for most homeowners. The plan — the centerpiece of last year's reform effort — would provide a 20 percent cut to homeowners who earn up to $100,000; a 15 percent cut for homeowners who earn up to $150,000; and a 10 percent cut for homeowners who earn up to $250,000.

In all, the plan would provide an average $1,051 tax cut for homeowners, though Corzine hasn't signed the plan into law yet.

Renters would also see tax help increased, with some getting more than four times as much property-tax relief as they got last year.

Under Corzine's budget plan, renters who earn up to $20,000 would get $350; up to $35,000 would get $300; up to $50,000 would get $200; and up to $100,000 would get $80.

Senior-citizen renters who earn up to $70,000 would get $860, up from $825 last year. Senior citizens who earn up to $100,000 would get $160.

Last year, all non-senior-citizen renters received a $75 check from the state.

Contributing: Staff writer Gene Racz

http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070301/NEWS/703010415/1001

ilovenj
03-02-2007, 11:17 AM
U.S. attorney subpoenas governor's office over budget documents

(02/28/07) TRENTON - Governor Jon Corzine’s (D-NJ) office received a subpoena from the U.S. Attorney’s Office Wednesday for its budget documents.

The subpoena is the latest in a round of subpoenas from federal investigators looking into the state’s budget development since 2004. A Corzine spokesman says the records requested from the governor’s office span the administrations of Democrats James McGreevey, Richard Codey and Corzine.

On February 16, the U.S. attorney subpoenaed documents from legislative leaders and their staff offices. Federal investigators were seeking information on grants that have been placed in the budget without public review just before the budget is adopted.




http://www.news12.com/NJ/topstories/article?id=190581

Marianita
03-02-2007, 02:41 PM
Hi ilovenj, It is searious business when subpoenas are served and especially when they concern the budget. It looks as if the funds were not properly used. If the public could not view them there must be something to hide. This should be interesting. When are we going to get leaders that have nothing to hide? Marianita

ilovenj
03-02-2007, 10:14 PM
TRENTON, N.J., Mar. 1, 2007
By TOM HESTER Jr. Associated Press Writer
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(AP) Federal prosecutors have subpoenaed budget documents from Gov. Jon S. Corzine's office in their investigation of the state's spending plan.

The grand jury subpoenas went to record custodians in the governor's office and his chief counsel's office, requesting "any and all documents" relating to grants that have typically been placed in the budget without public review just before the spending plan is adopted.

Corzine spokesman Anthony Coley confirmed Wednesday that the office had received the subpoena.


Prosecutors want documents, including e-mails, relating to budgets dating to 2004, a period that spans the administrations of Democrats James E. McGreevey, Richard J. Codey and Corzine.

The documents are to be provided by March 8 to the U.S. attorney's office in Newark.

"We will cooperate fully in this matter," said David Wald, spokesman for state Attorney General Stuart Rabner.

A spokesman for U.S. Attorney Christopher J. Christie declined to comment on Wednesday. Christie has repeatedly declined to discuss the inquiry, which so far has resulted in no indictments.

Federal investigators also subpoenaed documents from the Treasury Department, Department of Community Affairs, and Democratic and Republican legislative leaders on how the last three state budgets have been finalized.

The grants, commonly known as "Christmas tree items," are originated by lawmakers, but the governor approves them when signing the budget legislation.

The current $30.8 billion state budget, adopted last July, contained numerous last-minute add-ons from members of the majority Democratic Party. Corzine allowed them after a budget dispute that closed state government for a week and resulted in $1.8 billion in tax increases.

State Republican Chairman Tom Wilson said Christie's investigation "now touches the very pinnacle of the Democratic Party in New Jersey, Gov. Jon Corzine."

Wilson noted Republicans urged Corzine last year to veto the grants added to the budget by lawmakers, but alleged he instead "joined the back room cabal and signed the budget."

"Gov. Corzine talks about cleaning up government and restoring trust, but that's all he does," Wilson said. "It's time for him to do more than just talk."

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/03/01/ap/politics/mainD8NJ601G0.shtml

ilovenj
03-02-2007, 10:54 PM
WNBC-TV
6:12 p.m. EST February 28, 2007
TRENTON, N.J. - In a rare move by federal investigators, subpoenas were served on the office of New Jersey Gov. Jon Corzine Wednesday as part of an ongoing corruption probe. "We have received them," Corzine spokesman Anthony Coley said.

Newschannel 4 has learned a single FBI agent served the papers.

It's the latest round of subpoenas from federal investigators who on Feb. 16 subpoenaed documents from Democratic and Republican legislative leaders and their staff offices on how the last three state budgets have been finalized.

Coley said the subpoenas seek information about grants included in budgets dating back to 2004.

That would span the administrations of Democrats James E. McGreevey, Richard J. Codey and Corzine.

The grants, commonly known as "Christmas tree items," typically have been placed in the budget without public review just before the spending plan is adopted. The grants stem from lawmakers, but the governor approves them when signing the budget legislation.

The current $30.8 billion state budget, adopted last July, contained numerous last-minute add-ons put in by members of the controlling Democratic Party. Corzine allowed those add-ons after a budget dispute closed state government for a week and taxes were increased by about $1.8 billion.

Coley said the administration will cooperate with the request, and Corzine has asked Attorney General Stuart Rabner to oversee compliance, along with his chief counsel's office.

The U.S. Attorney's Office subpoenaed documents from the state Treasury Department and Senate Democrats last year as part of an inquiry into Sen. Wayne Bryant, D-Camden. Bryant has been under investigation by federal authorities looking into his role at the Stratford campus of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, in Camden County.

In September, a federal monitor asked by the U.S. attorney to review activities at UMDNJ issued a report stating Bryant received a no-work job at the school while helping to steer state funding to it through his role as Senate budget chairman.

After that report, state and federal authorities subpoenaed records about Bryant from Gloucester County and Rutgers University -- where Bryant also held jobs -- and the state Legislature. Bryant later resigned from his seat as influential Senate budget chairman.

Michael Drewniak, spokesman for U.S. Attorney Christopher Christie, declined to comment on Wednesday.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17388995/

Impeach Corzine
03-03-2007, 07:01 AM
Subpoenas are flying. Legislators are being questioned. Republicans are crying foul and Democrats are calling for cooler heads. It's been a whirlwind 3 weeks at the top levels of New Jersey government, with allegations aplenty as the U.S. Attorney's Office collects documents related to a key Camden County senator and his influence over the New Jersey budget. But what does all the legal jargon and political posturing mean? I am going to try and help everyone understand what is truely going on.

Q: Who's received a subpoena?
A: Legislative leaders in both political parties and staff offices, the Treasury Department and the Office of Legislative Services, known as OLS.

Q: OLS? That sounds like bureaucratic gibberish. What is that?
A: A nonpartisan research and legal agency that works for the Legislature. Staffers are prohibited from political activity and duties include bill drafting, legal opinions and handling public information.

Q: What's a subpoena?
A: A written command from a court requiring anyone or any group to, among other things, appear in court or present documents. They are used to collect evidence and testimony, but also to protect potential evidence from being destroyed.

Q: So what's this inquiry about?
A: Apparently how state money is directed and spent.

Q: Who is this key senator?
A: Wayne Bryant, of Lawnside, held huge sway as Senate budget chairman and raised eyebrows by simultaneously working as a senator, at a private law firm, at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Gloucester County and Rutgers-Camden Law School.

Q: So what?
A: In September, as part of an inquiry into UMDNJ, a federal monitor alleged Bryant got a no-work job at the school while helping steer state money to it. Federal investigators then subpoenaed data about Bryant from various agencies, and he resigned as Senate budget chairman.

Q: Any other legislators involved in this?
A: Four legislators voluntarily answered questions about Bryant in December by federal authorities who wanted to know how state funding was decided and how Bryant helped. The legislators said they cooperated and haven't heard again from authorities on the matter.

Q: What's the status of that inquiry?
A: The U.S. Attorney's Office and Legislative Services met in a closed federal court session, apparently to discuss whether Legislative Services had to turn over documents related to Bryant. Legislative Services doesn't want to give over the records because it contends New Jersey law makes communications between legislators and Legislative Services confidential.

Q: What happened in the hearing?
A: No one will say. It involves a grand jury, which is a secret process.

Q: What's a grand jury?
A: A group of citizens called to consider criminal allegations presented by prosecutors. They determine if there's probable cause to believe a person committed a crime.

Q: This doesn't sound so big if it involves one legislator?
A: Republicans think otherwise. They are pushing Democrats who control the Legislature to make Legislative Services turn over the documents. Democrats have resisted, saying that Legislative Services believes communications with lawmakers are secret under the constitution.

Q: Did that put an end to it?
A: Tthe U.S. Attorney's Office subpoenaed documents about the state budget dating back to 2004 from top legislators and Democratic and Republican offices. That indicates that either the Bryant inquiry has widened or a separate, broader investigation has begun.

Q: What are they looking for?
A: Likely whether legislators personally benefited from grants typically slipped into the budget just before it's adopted, so there's no public review.

Q: When will we know the outcome?
A: Nothing may happen. If something does it could be months from now. Such investigations typically take time.

JerseyDevil
03-04-2007, 02:41 PM
I was wondering if anyone watches Power and Politics on News 12 New Jersey.

Impeach Corzine
03-08-2007, 12:51 PM
We now know what Gov. Corzine's much ballyhooed increase in state aid to municipalities and schools plus the Legislature's "bold and courageous tax reform" efforts have yielded. Squat! After much fanfare and public posturing, the Legislature has given birth to a rewrite of the existing rebate program with highly questionable results for the overburdened taxpayers of New Jersey. The governor has trumpeted his budgeted increase in state aid. I have crunched the numbers.

The governor's budgeted aid increase of 2 percent for municipalities and 3 percent for schools, when applied to the 2006 taxes in Hunterdon, where I live, would yield a net tax reduction of $55 or less than 1 percent of my 2006 taxes. Notice that the governor's aid increase does not reduce taxes by 2 or 3 percent but is an increase in the aid amount, a much smaller number than the amount to be raised by taxes. I have already addressed the importance of the "reform" legislation enacted by the Democrats, who control the legislature, in an earlier blog entry. Many of us can expect to receive checks for amounts that are close to what we received last year under the now defunct "Saver" program.

Meanwhile, if I'm not mistaken, our friends in Trenton have quietly shoved a big chunk of the obligation for contributions to the public employee retirement fund off onto the municipalities. That new drain on the municipal coffers means an increase in our property taxes. As a result, Trenton's actions have actually created a net increase in our property taxes. Plus, we now have the highest sales tax in the nation. It is hard to find words strong enough to express an appropriate condemnation of those responsible for this egregious affront to our wallets and intelligence. I'm mad and I believe that every taxpayer in New Jersey should be too.

The only effective response that we can make is to vote the Democrats out. We probably can't get rid of the ringleaders from Essex, Hudson and Camden counties but we can deprive them of majority rule. These people are killing this state economically. Our window of opportunity to do something effective is closing. Once they sell the state's assets, there will not be anything to do but raise taxes some more. That will accelerate the state's decline.