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JerseyDevil
09-13-2005, 02:06 AM
Well I was looking up online speech synthesis information for a friend and I found a site talking about "Do You Speak American? (http://www.pbs.org/speak/)". One thing led to another and I found myself looking up on google "New Jersey accent (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22new+jersey+accent)".

I don't know whether I should be pissed or just feel sorry for the many ignorant people who think they actually know what a New Jerseyan sounds like because of the way we are portrayed in the movies. Listen - let's get this straight - we do not sound like that at all. What is considered a New Jersey accent is actually a New York accent - which some of northern NJ shares because of it's location. The other thing - a lot of New Yorkers move here and I know this might be hard to believe - but they bring that accent with them.

Just for the record NO New Jerseyan I have ever heard says "New Joisey" - but that seems to be a running joke whenever I go outside the state and say I'm from New Jersey. Usually the response is - "You mean New Joisey? HAHAAAHAAA" As some one in a messageboard said - No one in New Jersey says that and the joke is getting old. I think with all the turnpike jokes and "You from Joisey" jokes - that people outside of NJ must have very little imagination - they've rehashed the same jokes for decades.

What other ignorant stereotypes are there about New Jersey?

One other thing - when I was out in oregon I had been asked repeatedly if NJ has any trees. :) The standing joke about our beaches seems to involve hypodermic needles - which is funny - because that stereotype came about because New York dumped a section of Fresh Kills Landfill into the water, which then washed up on our beaches. new Jersey then proceeded to sue them for the clean up - which NY had to pay. This happened during the 70's whch just shows how ignorant people can be. New Jersey actually has the toughest water standards in the country.

By the way - my turnpike exit is 8A. :p I just wanted to make sure I saved some people from asking that old joke too. :D

MITHRANDIR
09-13-2005, 01:30 PM
By the way - my turnpike exit is 8A. :p I just wanted to make sure I saved some people from asking that old joke too. :D

IIRC that is next to good old SR-32 and near CR-535. :)

The NJTP is great road (although a bit expensive) if you are traveling from DEL MEM Bridge to GW Bridge. The most direct path if I remember my geography correctly.


One other thing - when I was out in oregon I had been asked repeatedly if NJ has any trees. :) The standing joke about our beaches seems to involve hypodermic needles - which is funny - because that stereotype came about because New York dumped a section of Fresh Kills Landfill into the water, which then washed up on our beaches. new Jersey then proceeded to sue them for the clean up - which NY had to pay. This happened during the 70's whch just shows how ignorant people can be. New Jersey actually has the toughest water standards in the country.

By the way - my turnpike exit is 8A. :p I just wanted to make sure I saved some people from asking that old joke too. :D

Related to the tree comment, It surprises me when I here it said that NJ has the highest population density of all 50 states. This is because I see all the relatively open areas in the Northwestern and Southern NJ. This tells me what I already now, the Northeastern part of NJ is very crowded. ;)

When I hear the New "Joisey" accent, I usually think of Italian and Brooklyn. I guess I watch to many mob/gangster films. ;)


What other ignorant stereotypes are there about New Jersey?
NJ is full of toxic waste dumps and superfund sites.

If you remember seeing the Fletch Lives film. The is a scene when Fletch is listening for the list of toxic waste dumps, he stops his editor and says to please just tell me of the sites that are not in NJ.

IIRC from history class, Nikita Kruschov (sp?) the USSR leader visited the UN the US gov't drove him down to PHL to see the naval shipyard and back. They used the NJTP to get there. Afterwards Nikita was asked what he thought of NJ. His reply was that it was full of chemical plants and trees. ;)

JerseyDevil
10-02-2005, 09:58 PM
IIRC that is next to good old SR-32 and near CR-535. :)

I have no idea. :)


The NJTP is great road (although a bit expensive) if you are traveling from DEL MEM Bridge to GW Bridge. The most direct path if I remember my geography correctly.

WelllOnly out of staters are driving from the Delaware Memorial Bridge to the George Washington Bridge (generally just passing through and not visiting NJ), so why should I care that it's expensive to travel the entire length on (I don't travel the entire length). I say better for them to pay for it than the NJ tax payers. :evil:



Related to the tree comment, It surprises me when I here it said that NJ has the highest population density of all 50 states. This is because I see all the relatively open areas in the Northwestern and Southern NJ. This tells me what I already now, the Northeastern part of NJ is very crowded. ;)

yeah, if you look the majority of people live in northeastern NJ (abour 10 miles on either side of the Turnpike and then along the RT 1 Corridor from Woodbridge down to Trenton, which includes my town, and then around Camden. The shore region, particularly Toms River is becoming a nightmare though. I think that sucks. Atlantic City is really the only city along the shore and much of the shore is protected. Look at the Pine Barrens - 1.1 million acres of woodland (mostly protected), the Meadowlands which currently includes 8,500 acres of protected marshland and wildlife habitat in the heart of the mos densly populated area in the country. not to mention the most expensive land in the country, then the northwest area where all the mountains are. Again another NJ stereotype shot to dust. :D


When I hear the New "Joisey" accent, I usually think of Italian and Brooklyn. I guess I watch to many mob/gangster films. ;)

yeah, it's generally a NY thing.:p They seem to be ashamed of it, so they act like it's our accent and make fun of it. :D It's rather hilarious. It's sort of like overhearing some New Yorkers at Seaside complaining about NJ and saying how boring it is. I just want to walk up to them and say "If you hate it so much, then why are you even here, why not go to the beaches on Long Island?" I actually think my cousin Steve may have done that this past summer.

I did a search on google for "NJ accent" and this thread is the second on the first page as of 10/2/05. Not too shabby there. Now if I could only get NJ Hotels and other key things in a good position. Anyway - number one is this forum on BBC America which talks about the NJ accent. I posted on it - Other then Southern Accents.. (http://discussions.bbcamerica.com/thread.jspa?threadID=35186&tstart=0)



NJ is full of toxic waste dumps and superfund sites.

The thing is, it's not necessarily quantity, but it's also size and location that counts too. Most of our toxic wastesites are in ONE location of the state (I initially said country which gives some indication of what I think of NJ :D).


If you remember seeing the Fletch Lives film. The is a scene when Fletch is listening for the list of toxic waste dumps, he stops his editor and says to please just tell me of the sites that are not in NJ.

There is a snide comment in "Cinderella Man" about NJ smelling and then I couldn't believe it - Weird NJ (well Weird US on the History Channel) had a snide comment too. I need to write to them about that. Why are tey perpetuating the erroneous negative stereotypes?


IIRC from history class, Nikita Kruschov (sp?) the USSR leader visited the UN the US gov't drove him down to PHL to see the naval shipyard and back. They used the NJTP to get there. Afterwards Nikita was asked what he thought of NJ. His reply was that it was full of chemical plants and trees. ;)
As is what most people see because all they do is drive through. I personally think that the NJ turnpike was one of the worst things to happen to NJ.

Eric Stephenson
10-03-2005, 08:45 AM
I feel I have to weigh in at this point...

I agree with the sentiments above and it is kind of funny that the national perception of NJ is based on the very limited views available from the NJTP and Parkway.

But on the flip side, I kind of like the fact that this perception has limited the tourist traffic to some degree. I know that the shore towns and other areas really depend on that tourism but this state is getting pretty crazy when it comes to traffic.

Alot of my "leave it alone" sentiment also derives from the fact that when I g camping or site seeing or just walking the boardwalk i really don't want to have to listen to somebody with a "different" accent whining about NJ.

I like my state and I don't like people "passing thru" complaining about it.

As JerseyDevil said (but I will say it a little less tactfully): YOU DON'T LIKE IT THEN GET THE HECK OUT!!!

Marianita
02-10-2006, 09:19 PM
Well, there are many interesting topics here. I think it was South Jersey magazine where I saw, ''You from Joisey, I'm from Joisey.'' I think it is all in fun. Now I may have been in California for a long time but I still have my accent and I am proud of it. Now I am not positive it is a NJ accent accent but is definitely east coast. It is part of me. As for the Garden State Parkway, I love it. And once a year NJ is my home for the time I am there. I am completely at home. And a note for Jersey Devil. My son is getting ready to buy a home in Marlton. They did renew their lease Feb 1st because my son and his wife are having a ''discussion.'' She wants a new condo and he wants a house he can do gardening and such. Let's see who will win out. I told him a new condo sounds wonderful but then so does his idea. By the way, I cannot understand why anyone would ask if NJ has any trees. I have never seen so many beautiful trees in my life. Maybe they have never been to NJ, Take care. Marianita

davegering
02-12-2006, 04:06 PM
email from my cousin

You know you're from Jersey if...

You've been seriously injured at Action Park.
You don't jog in the park, you smoke there.
18 to party and 21 to drink really means bring extra money for the bouncer.
All good mornings begin with a bagel, all good nights end at a diner and of course all good parties end with a fight.
You know that the only people who call it "Joisey" are from New York (usually The Bronx) or Texas.
You don't think of citrus when people mention "The Oranges."
You know that it's called "Great Adventure," not "Six Flags."
You've ordered a hard roll with butter, or pork roll and egg for breakfast.
It's pork roll, not taylor ham or canadian bacon!
Jersey girls are the best girls, just stay on their good side.
When you cut someone off, you get the horn and the finger.
When somebody tries to mimic a jersey accent you wanna take a bat to their head... badda bing
You've known the way to Seaside Heights since you were seven.
You've eaten at a diner, when you were stoned or drunk, at 3 am.
Whenever you park, there's a Camaro within three spots of you.
You remember that the "Two Guys" were from Harrison.
You know that the state isn't one big oil refinery.
At least three people in your family still love Bruce Springsteen, and you know what town Jon Bon Jovi is from.
You know what a "jug handle" is.
You know that a WaWa is a convenience store.
You know that the state isn't all farmland.
You know that there are no "beaches" in new Jersey - there's "The Shore," and you know that the road to the shore is "The Parkway" not "The Garden State Highway."
You know that "Piney" isn't referring to a tree.
Even your school cafeteria made good Italian subs, and, you call it a "sub" not a "submarine sandwich" or worse yet, a grinder, a "hoagie" or a "hero."
You remember the song from the Palisades Park commercials.
You know how to properly negotiate a Circle.
You knew that the last question had to do with driving.
You know that "Acme" is an actual store, not just a Warner Bros creation.
You know that this is the only "New..." state that doesn't require "New" to identify it (like, try ..Mexico, ..York, ..Hampshire (doesn't work, does it?).
You know how to translate this conversation: "Jeet yet?" "No, Jew?"
You only go to New York City for day trips, and you only call it "The City."
You know that a "White Castle" is the name of BOTH a fast food chain AND a fast food sandwich.
You consider a corned beef sandwich with lettuce and mayo a sacrilege.
In the 80's you wore your hair REALLY high.
You don't think "What exit" (do you live near?) is very funny.
You know that the real first "strip shopping center" in the country is Route 22.
You know that no respectable New Jerseyan goes to Princeton - that's for out-of-staters.
The Jets-Giants game has started fights at your school or local bar.
You live within 20 minutes of at least three different malls.
You can see the Manhattan skyline from some part of your town.
You've gotten on the wrong highway trying to get out of Willowbrook Mall.
You've eaten a Boardwalk cheese steak with vinegar fries.
You have a favorite Atlantic City casino.
You refer to all highways and interstates by their numbers.
Every year you have at least one kid in your class named Tony.
You know the location of every clip shown in the Sopranos opening credits.
You know that people from North Jersey go to Seaside Heights, and people from Central Jersey go to Belmar and people from South Jersey go to Wildwood.
You can spend countless hours on the boardwalk doing absolutely nothing...and still have fun.
You may say some words with an accent, but at least you don't say "ya'll".
You weren't raised in New Jersey -- you were raised in either North Jersey, Central Jersey or South Jersey.
You know 65 mph really means 80.
You don't consider Newark or Camden to actually be part of the state.
Its pronounced NORK not Newark
You remember the stores Korvette's, Two Guys, Rickel's, Channel, Bamberger's and Orbach's.
You also remember Palisades Amusement Park.
You start planning for Memorial Day weekend in February.
You've never pumped your own gas.
The only state to have farms, beaches, cities, vacation resorts, mountains, and they are never any more than a 4 hour drive. Oh, and NYC and Philly are extremely close as well.
You actually get these jokes and pass them on to other friends from New Jersey.

Marianita
02-13-2006, 12:48 AM
Wow , that's cool, all those New Jersey sayings. I am pretty much qualified. So the proper thing to say is, ''The parkway'', not Garden State Parkway?'' I have my favorite casino which is Balleys and they made my car payments for me for the months of August and Sept. lol. I have eaten at alot of diners, my favorite being in Medford but the Harvest is nice too. I know about Wawas and jug handles but have never driven a circle there, here I have though. I been to Wildwood from South Jersey and I been to Cape May. Oh yes, I know,''Route 70 to Marlton.'' lol. Marianita

JerseyDevil
02-21-2006, 08:39 PM
I don't agree with all of the above items in "you know you're from NJ...", but I'd say probably at least 90% are right on. For instance, I don't agree with the "You don't jog in the park, you smoke there." and I'm trying to break New Jerseyans of this one - "You weren't raised in New Jersey -- you were raised in either North Jersey, Central Jersey or South Jersey." and this one I really disagree with "Its pronounced NORK not Newark ". There are so many "You know you're from New Jersey if..." lists out there, but I don't think I've seen this one before.

Nurv had posted in the "Why so down on NJ (http://forum.aboutnewjersey.com/showthread.php?t=167)" thread about an artlce on Tomato Nation (http://www.earlygirl.com) and I thought this artilcle was VERY fitting for this section...



Perfect Together
Props to my peeps in the 908 (http://www.earlygirl.com/jersey.shtml)

If I could ban a two-word phrase from the English language, any two-word phrase, I would pick one in particular immediately and without hesitation. No, not "Bush administration," because experience has sadly proven that ignoring that phrase doesn't make its subject go away (ditto "Hilton sisters"). No, it's a far more innocuous-sounding collection of syllables, but I could live a long and happy life if I never heard them again, to wit: "Which exit?"

It isn't funny. It just isn't, and I'll tell you why. It's not not funny in the sense that New Jersey natives have no sense of humor about ourselves or our state; when the rest of the world thinks your home is all gigantic hair and hypodermics on the beach, you kind of have to find a way to laugh about it. But it's one thing to bust on Jersey if you grew up there, because you know what the hell you're talking about. "Which exit?" tells me right away that you don't, because -- which exit off of which road?

Yeah, yeah, you "meant the Jersey Turnpike." First of all, it's not "the Jersey Turnpike." It's just "the Turnpike." Second of all, not every goddamn residential dwelling in the state faces onto it. Look, people: owning The Sopranos on DVD and really liking the song "Thunder Road" does not equal "knowing anything about Jersey," and when you think it does, you annoy the natives. Greatly.

Sorry, jeez! So, if I take the Jersey Turnpike to the house where you grew up --

"The Turnpike." It's just "the Turnpike."

Sorry. So, I take the Turnpike to…Interstate 78? Right? And then Route 124 to --

Okay, stop. It's just "78." In L.A., everyone calls it "the 10" and "the 2," but we don't do that. It's just the number, or "Route [number]." So it's the Turnpike to 78 West to 124, or the Turnpike to 22 West.

And how would I get to the New Jersey shore?

You mean down the shore? Various ways; the shore is big. Start by taking the Parkway, usually.

And once I'm at the shore --

"Once you're down the shore," you mean.

Uh…huh?

You go down the shore, and once you're there, you're…down the shore. I don't know why, it's just how we say it. Actually, it's more like "downashore," but whatever.

But I shouldn't go to the beach, right? Because of all the needles?

I have never seen a needle on a Jersey beach. That's not to say that they aren't there; I've just never seen one. I've seen needles on Cape Cod beaches several times, but the biggest issue I've had on Jersey beaches is a jellyfish warning. Which I should have heeded, but that's a story for another time.

Okay, good to know. So what's with the "bennies go home" bumper stickers?

Heh. I didn't know they still made those. Nobody seems to know where the word "bennies" comes from, but basically it's year-rounders telling the obnoxious house-share people to get bent.

Wow. Tough crowd in Joisey.

Okay: no. If you remember nothing else, please please remember this: "Joisey" is a Brooklyn pronunciation. We don't talk like that. Don't say it that way, or write it that way. Ever.

Excuse me, then: "Tough crowd in New Jersey."

It's…just "Jersey." Sometimes it's "Jerz" or "the Jerz" or "New Jerz," but it's usually just "Jersey."

So what is a Jersey accent, then?

Ray Liotta in GoodFellas has a classic Jersey accent, but it depends on where in the state you are. A North Jersey accent is a bit different from a South Jersey accent.

But…the state is tiny. How can it have two different accents?

It's tiny, but it's two different states, sort of. The north is what everyone thinks of as the "real" Jersey with the refineries and the towns all crammed together and whatnot; the south is more farmland, and the Pine Barrens, and so on.

"Farmland"? That's a joke, right?

Oy. Look, contrary to popular belief, it's not called "the Garden State" as a joke. Jersey is something like fifty percent arable land. The Pine Barrens is a forest, and it's big. The Watchung Reservation, which you can see from my parents' front porch, is horse trails and trees with a road running through it, and it's a fifteen-minute bike ride to a U.S. Open championship golf course. If all you see is the view out the window on the Parkway, yeah, it looks like a concrete hell, but the state is really pretty. Go through the Delaware Water Gap sometime; it's a nice drive.

Anyway. In the southern part of the state, you can still find people who believe in the Jersey Devil down there; it's where that legend originated.

That's an actual thing?

According to the guys on the front porch of the Kingston General Supply Store, it is. But…obviously it isn't. It's something colonial farmers made up to explain why their livestock kept getting eaten; apparently, "wolf" was too obvious for them.

continued...

JerseyDevil
02-21-2006, 08:40 PM
I don't understand jughandles.

It's really not that difficult, but everyone's a comedian all "what's the deal with airline peanuts" about them, so let me try to explain. You know how, when you exit a highway, you peel off to the right, and then you loop back around to the left to go into the town or whatever? Same exact principle, just on a smaller scale. On some Jersey roads, allowing turns from the left lane would back traffic all the way up to hell, so: jughandle. They're quite handy.

Maybe if you're used to all those crazy Jersey dri--

We don't drive that badly. Really. This is a fifteen-year-old statistic so I should probably hunt up a newer one, but as of 1990, Jersey had the third-lowest rate of traffic deaths in the 48 contiguous states -- with the most paved roads per hectare, or whatever. Which means that, given how crowded it is, we drive quite safely. Your best bet when driving in Jersey: move it or lose it. It's the pokey Pennsylvanians that tend to gum everything up, so step lively, and we're not kidding around with our left lane -- if you can't hack it, move over.

Well, if you're such awesome drivers, how come they don't let you pump your own gas?

I think it's because of how much road there is, and how many gas stations there therefore are, in the state, but I don't rightly know. It's annoying, that I do know.

Is Newark really a big scary ****hole?

So glad you asked! No. It isn't Mayberry, but it isn't the gold standard of dangerous crappy urban blight, either. It has a spiffy arts center and great restaurants, and an inexpensive and convenient (if often hilariously incompetent) minor-league team right near the train. (Awesomely, the Bears do not sell foam fingers, but rather foam bear paws. Hee.) The go-to ****hole in New Jersey is Camden, which is maybe not a fair categorization any longer, but as of ten years ago…yikes.

So, a lot of Mafia there, then?

A lot of crack addicts, is the problem in Camden.

The Mafia is not really something most Jerseyans deal with in their day-to-day lives. We all knew a couple kids who had pagers before anyone besides doctors carried them, and when that one girl's dad and boyfriend each bought her a Beemer for her birthday? Yeah, her dad was not "in paper" and her 35-year-old boyfriend was not "in dental supply." But it had nothing to do with us. I mean, I went to a girls' school; we didn't do a lot of illegal gambling or construction work.

But you listened to a lot of Bon Jovi.

Well, if it was on the radio.

You're from Jersey and you don't like Bon Jovi? Do you not like Springsteen either?

Okay, honestly, this is like asking a Californian if she "likes" the Pacific. It's not a like/dislike issue. It's…just there. Sure, some Californians -- the ones who surf, I'd imagine -- are going to actively love the Pacific, and some Jerseyans actively love the Boss. But for some of us, he's…just there.

Bon Jovi is really not as strongly identified with Jersey, in a weird way. It's more of a time-period thing than a Jersey thing -- like, we'll happily claim Bruce and Sinatra, but mention Bon Jovi to us and we're kind of like, "Oh, this is about the hair, isn't it. Okay, fine." We didn't really decide he was A Jersey Emblem; everyone else did, because of the perm. I mean, yeah, we all listened to their music, because everyone did, because they had two huge albums in a row and were all over MTV.

Yeah, about the hair…

I don't think I understand how we ended up holding the big-hair bag. Texas? Hello? Don't get me wrong, I have attended heavy-metal battles of the bands in Union (and I guarantee you, the North Jersey readers just went, "Ohhhhh man," because…ohhhhh man), and no question, that's the biggest hair I've ever seen, not counting Patti LaBelle. Double-process perm, back-combed, ten minutes -- not spritzes, minutes -- of Aqua Net at the roots? Sure. Light a match in the ladies' and it's a Michael Bay movie.

But I've seen that hair in Philly, too. And Augusta. And Cleveland. And upstate New York, like, two years ago. I myself sported the fetching (read: "ridiculous") Ocean-Spray-wave bangs, but we didn't really do the big foofy poodle hair at my school or around my town. A few girls did, the girls who drove Camaros and had married boyfriends and got permission to smoke at school from their parents. It was like Bon Jovi in that it wasn't a function of Jersey; it was a function of the eighties. When the eighties ended, so did that hair.

See, here's the thing. We had TV. We had magazines. New York is right there. It's not like Jersey doesn't know what's going on. A lot of the stuff we catch **** for, everyone else does or did -- and worse.

So…you didn't work in a mall?

No, I worked as a gravedigger in order to subvert the stereotype. Duh, of course I worked in a mall. I was sixteen, I lived near a mall, I wasn't really qualified to do anything else yet besides straighten t-shirts -- so I worked at a mall store, like half the teenagers in America. I mean, they've got malls in Florida. I've seen them. But Floridians get the dip**** questions about Disneyworld, I guess, and we get the mall question. And yes, my friends worked there too, and yes, I would time my break to coincide with my boyfriend's break and we'd meet at the Mrs. Field's. Yes, I am a Jersey cliché. Happy now?

I also worked at a church, and for a lobbyist organization, and as a pool tester. My question is whether people from the Minneapolis area get the mall crap, because you can see that mall from space, but I bet they don't. I bet they get the "cold enough for ya?" thing, and everyone trying to do the accent from Fargo, and Jerseyans get the mall thing.

I mean, see above. The whole country's got malls, and bad hair, and crappy driving, and pollution. We just get "the credit" for that stuff for some reason. The fact that we also coughed up Thomas Edison doesn't seem to count for anything. Or WFMU. Or Weird NJ. Come on, people. At least try to see the good.

I'm from California, and I think our tomatoes --

Just…stop right there. They're not better. They're just not. Find me a person with a California tomato tattooed on his or her person. Yeah, I didn't think so.

A Jersey beefsteak tomato is the apotheosis of tomato-ness. If you don't agree, you've never eaten one in season. This is not up for debate or alternative interpretation. The Jersey tomato is the best tomato in the world. Period.

February 7, 2005

Again - I don't agree with ALL of these - for instance the just calling it "Jersey" - it actually grates on my nerves a bit. It's been used quite a bit as putdown from NY. I also like having full service gas stations and prefer them over self service. Let the rest of the country have self service if they want - in general for having to pump their own gas - they generally have more expensive gas.

Just a note - my cousins live in Beachwood - just south of Toms River which is the frist town you enter whe leaving Seaside Heights - according to him they still have what they call the "Bennie Parade" at the end of the season. I have also gotten into arguments with my cousins because they have wanted to call me a "Bennie", at least asked if I was one first - but for the recorde - I am NOT a Bennie - I grew up in Bricktown adn when to school 4 blocks from the ocean in Pt Pleasant Beach at St Peters. So - the bennie name is still popular with the locals along the shore - as is the term shoobies as far as I know.

By the way - supposedly the term "benny" comes from the names of old train stations along the Jersey Shore line....

(B)ayonne
(E)lizabeth
(N)ewark
(N)ew (Y)ork

Marianita
02-22-2006, 01:00 AM
I don't think I have been to Newark. But I asked my son about the pronunciation and he said people say something like,''Nwark'' only with little more emphasis on the ''new''. In other words it is not ''Newark'' as spelled. Maybe I am not clarifying it but you can get the idea. As for the New Jersey drivers, I don't see that they drive badly but the driving situation is different so they drive differently. I have never driven there in NJ but I don't think I would have a problem with it. We do not have jug handles but we have a lot of open roads which mean a temptation to speed. As regards tomatoes, I have never seen such nice red tomatoes anywhere like I did in New Jersey. Let's give due credit. I am a professional cook and notice those things. Now since there seems to be much a do about the accent I have given it more thought. It could be a combination of several things. It depends on different factors. As I told you I speak fluent Spanish but being Norwegian I naturally picked up some of the language from my parents. I was born and raised in Maryland and moved to California. So what kind of accent do you think I have? It is a combination. Interesting. So when you say that only the new Yorkers say,''New Joisey,'' it is quite possible. Am I making sense? LOL. Marianita

davegering
04-09-2006, 10:45 PM
You might be from New Jersey if...
1. You don't understand why there aren't more 24-hour diners elsewhere in the country.
2. You know what a Wawa is, and know the location of at least 15 of
them.
3. You think a mountain is that big freakin' hill in Atlantic
Highlands.
4. You know Asbury Park is no longer the mecca of East Coast resort
towns.
5. Even though there's a new Walmart in your town, you still go to the
Englishtown Auction for cheap stuff.
6. You can name all the flavors of salt water taffy.
7. Your car is covered with yellow-green dust in April and May.
8. You buy Shop-Rite brand food at Shop-Rite.
9. You can smell and know when it's low tide.
10. The Jets/Giants game has started fights at your school and/or
local bar.
11. There are no self serve gas stations and you like it that freakin'
way... "yous gotta problem wit dat?"
12. You've had sex on the beach, and I'm not talking about the
beverage.
13. You know how to successfully handle a traffic circle.
14. You know what skeeball is and you can get three 50's in a row.
15. You think the Olive Garden is crap and should have never opened any restaurants in New Jersey.
16. You've run out of money on the Parkway.
17. You're Italian.
18. You know where to get the best bagel.
19. Donald Trump is mentioned at least daily in your local paper.
20. You say "water" weird. (Wadder, Cawfee, Dowg, wadever)
21. Even your school made good Italian subs.
22. You've lived through hurricanes, nor'easters and fires, but have
never seen a tornado, earthquake, tsunami or volcano.
23. You can't believe MTV went to Seaside Heights.
24. You know that ACME is an actual store, not just a Warner Bros.
creation.
25. You only go to New York City for day trips.
26. You know what a "jug handle" is.
27. You have mandatory recycling. Enforced by law.
28. You've eaten a pork roll and cheese on a hard roll...and like it.
29. You go to at least one parade at the boardwalk each year.
30. You've pondered, "Maybe basketball would be more popular in New Jersey if the Nets didn't blow,"
31. You can go bowling at 1:30 A.M. (with automatic scoring)!
32. In high school, you worked at a Friendly's.
33. Route 18 doesn't freak you out at night.
34. Because your town was founded before 1776, all the restaurants,
taverns, and shops have "ye," "olde," and"colonial" in their names.
35. You don't have to go to red lobster to get fresh seafood.
36. You once said, "It smells like New York in here,"
37. You've waited for the goddamn drawbridge for more than 20 damn minutes.
38. At least three people in your family still love Bruce Springsteen.
39. There's a fruit and vegetable stand down the road.
40. "Anyone who makes bad pizza can go to hell" is your attitude.
41. You always use a minimum of 10 variations of the word "damn"while
driving.
42. You don't take any **** from anybody. Especially from someone from New York, because you live here for Christ's sake and just who the hell do they think they are anyway? Invading our damn beaches and bars, they're just here for the damn summer and they think they own the damn place and....
43. You've gone to the race track with twenty different daily double
bets from twenty different people
44. You've spent St. Patrick's Day in Belmar.
45. You know that there are bakeries which are not part of a
supermarket, but actual individual stores.
46. You've ordered a "hard roll with butter" for breakfast.
47. One time, a sea gull crapped on your head.
48. You've eaten at a Windmill, drunk off your ass, at 3am at least a
dozen times.
49. You know what a "benny" is and can pick one out at the beach.
50. You've planned a local trip around ensuring you pass at least one
Dunkin' Donuts.
*51. You don't think of citrus when people mention "The Oranges"
*52. You know that it's called "Great Adventure"... not "SixFlags",
dammit!
*53. When people ask you where you live, you tell them your
Parkway/Turnpike exit number.
*54. You watched "Mallrats" and said "I've been to that mall!"
*55. At least half the people you knew in high school went to Rutgers.
*56. You know where Jimmy Hoffa is buried.
*57. Your big class trip in elementary school was to Morristown.
*58. You long for the days when the Devils wore Christmas colors.
*59. You know that the only people that call it "Joisey" are from New
York.
*60. You're radioactive and proud of it.

JerseyDevil
04-09-2006, 11:52 PM
Sorry Dave I moved this new "You know you're from NJ" list because it had nothing to do with people thinking NJ is a borough of NY (http://forum.aboutnewjersey.com/showthread.php?t=312) - where it was initially posted and then also - I have to say - most of these things are negative stereotypes against NJ. I don't know why we should be "proud" of these lists. I mean - are you radioactive and proud of it? Do you say Cowfee - or is that more of a brooklyn/NY accent that has migrated across the river? The one about the Nets is a bit old - no one can deny that the Nets are good now. Of course now they're supposed to move to Brooklyn, but the way our politicians work, they'll probably allow the team to play in NJ, but rename themselves the Brooklyn Nets. I do like number 42 though :)

I don't deny I don't like reading them, so you are more than welcome to post more you come across, but please let's keep them in this thread, because I do think most of them just are stereotypes of New Jersey - some negative.

DebbieSans
04-11-2006, 05:24 PM
47. One time, a sea gull crapped on your head.

I really LOL'd at that one because, yes, that has happened to me! (still laughing)

Debbie

JerseyDevil
04-11-2006, 05:30 PM
I really LOL'd at that one because, yes, that has happened to me! (still laughing)

Good to see you back Debbie, I was afraid you might have left for some other messageboard. :p As for number 47 - I can luckily say that it has never happened to me.

Jersey Warren
04-11-2006, 05:31 PM
This is my first post. It's good to be here. I moved out of NJ in 1970 but my heart is still there, along with my Mom, brothers, nephews, and nieces. After bouncing around the country, I now reside in Florida, and get back every few years.

The first state I lived in outside the New Jersey/New York metropoitan area was Massachusetts. For years, I had many conversations like this:

Them: "Where did you grow up?"

Me: "New Jersey."

Them: "New Juhrsey?" (In Boston accent)

Me: "Yes, New JURR-Zee" (In NJ accent)

Them: "That's strange, you don't TALK funny!"

Me: "What do you mean, funny?"

Them: "Well, you don't say JOIZEY!"

Me; "NO ONE in New Jersey says Joizey."

Them: "Yes they do, I'e heard them."

Me: "No you didn't, because NO ONE from New Jersey says JOIZEE. If you heard someone say JOIZEE, they must have been an eighth-grade dropout from Brooklyn!"

Them: "Well I still think you don't sound like you're from New Juhrsey. You sound more like you're from Connecticut."

Me: "That's probably because I grew up in Bergen County, where people talk almost identically to people from Southwestern Connecticut. Besides that, the two areas probably have the greatest concentration of wealth on the face of the Earth!"

Them: "Well you mst have grown up in a city."

Me: "I grew up about 25 miles from New York City, but in a small rural town."

Them: "New Jurhsey has small, rural towns?"

Me: "My town was called Upper Saddle River. When I lived there, we had apple orchards, strawberry farms, a dairy farm, one general store called Elmer's, no sidewalks, no sewers, no street lights, a four-man police department, and a volunteer fire department."

Them: "That sounds like New Hampshuh!"

Me: "Actually, my town in the 1960s looked very much like a small New Hampshire town of today (the 1970s-80s).

Them: "I never would have thought that."

I've been doing my part to educate the rest of America about the Garden State since 1970. It's not an easy job, but somebody has to do it!

JerseyDevil
04-11-2006, 05:36 PM
This is my first post. It's good to be here. I moved out of NJ in 1970 but my heart is still there, along with my Mom, brothers, nephews, and nieces. After bouncing around the country, I now reside in Florida, and get back every few years.

The first state I lived in outside the New Jersey/New York metropoitan area was Massachusetts. For years, I had many conversations like this:

Them: "Where did you grow up?"

Me: "New Jersey."

Them: "New Juhrsey?" (In Boston accent)

Me: "Yes, New JURR-Zee" (In NJ accent)

Them: "That's strange, you don't TALK funny!"

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I've been doing my part to educate the rest of America about the Garden State since 1970. It's not an easy job, but somebody has to do it!
Welcome Jersey Warren. I love it. :lmao: I've had the same encounters. People have no idea what NJ is like. But as you said, it's not an easy job, but someone has to do it.

BTW - this thread is one of the most retrieved threads off of Google. :)

Jersey Warren
04-11-2006, 05:38 PM
While I'm on this page, I thought I'd say something about that, too.

My grandfather, who was born and raised in Jersey City, not far from Newark, always pronounced it to rhyme with Buick: "Newick."

Am I the only one to snicker when out of staters mispronounce the names of NJ cities?

It's Puh-SAKE, not Pa-SAY-ick.

It's Pa-RAM-us, not PAR-A-mus.

It's SEA-caucus, not Se-CAU-cus.

DebbieSans
04-11-2006, 05:38 PM
Good to see you back Debbie, I was afraid you might have left for some other messageboard. :p As for number 47 - I can luckily say that it has never happened to me.

Thanks JD! There's only one Jersey message board for me ;) Been very busy lately with work and music, but I'm still lurking around :)

Take care,
Deb

JerseyDevil
04-11-2006, 05:43 PM
While I'm on this page, I thought I'd say something about that, too.

My grandfather, who was born and raised in Jersey City, not far from Newark, always pronounced it to rhyme with Buick: "Newick."

Am I the only one to snicker when out of staters mispronounce the names of NJ cities?

It's Puh-SAKE, not Pa-SAY-ick.

It's Pa-RAM-us, not PAR-A-mus.

It's SEA-caucus, not Se-CAU-cus.
I have always pronounced Newark as New-erk and Seacaus as Suh-cau-cus. It was only recently when I moved back to NJ that I have heard people saying "SEA-cauc-us". I'm going to have to ask my father about this, because he grew up in Newark and I would like to see how he pronounces it. I also say Puh-SAY-ick for Passaic. I do say Pa-RAM-us for Paramus though.

DebbieSans
04-11-2006, 06:32 PM
Does anyone else have the "You say tomato, I say tomahto" song running through their heads? ;) I've always said New-erk, Puh-SAY-ick and Suh-cau-cus too, and I grew up in Bergen County. My dad, however, who grew up in Patterson used to say them the other way.

Deb


I have always pronounced Newark as New-erk and Seacaus as Suh-cau-cus. It was only recently when I moved back to NJ that I have heard people saying "SEA-cauc-us". I'm going to have to ask my father about this, because he grew up in Newark and I would like to see how he pronounces it. I also say Puh-SAY-ick for Passaic. I do say Pa-RAM-us for Paramus though.

Jersey Warren
04-12-2006, 02:18 PM
Does anyone else have the "You say tomato, I say tomahto" song running through their heads? ;) I've always said New-erk, Puh-SAY-ick and Suh-cau-cus too, and I grew up in Bergen County. My dad, however, who grew up in Paterson used to say them the other way.

Deb

There is a definite difference, even from county to county. While my grandfather (Hudson county raised) said Newick (rhymes with Buick), I called it New-erk, like you, being a Bergen County native. (Some people from other states call it New ARK, as in, Noah built a new boat!)

I went to high school with several kids from Passaic and they all pronounced it Pa-SAKE. My family owned a restaurant on Main Avenue in Passaic in 1965 and all of the natives said it that way. Age affects someone's pronunciations, too, since sometimes they evolve with time. For example, I'm 58 and I remember when Secaucus was known for its pig farms. Maybe people who wanted to divest themselves of that image decided that Se CAUCUS sounded more gentile that SEA caucus! Beats me.

I also remember real NJ oldtimers (over 50 years ago) who pronounced Route (as in Route 4) to rhyme with "out" instead of like root. But that seemed to die out.

Marianita
04-12-2006, 08:43 PM
Hi Jersey warren, I always pronounced Newark new ark but I guess the proper way is to say it is Newerk. I agree that accents do change with age and location. I was born and raised in Maryland, am Norwegian and live in California so think what that would do ones accent. lol. People still say they know I am not from here. As for the word ''route,'' I think it does depend on location. I always pronounce it ''root.'':) Take care. Marianita

MITHRANDIR
04-13-2006, 10:45 AM
Hi Jersey warren, I always pronounced Newark new ark but I guess the proper way is to say it is Newerk. I agree that accents do change with age and location. I was born and raised in Maryland, am Norwegian and live in California so think what that would do ones accent. lol. People still say they know I am not from here. As for the word ''route,'' I think it does depend on location. I always pronounce it ''root.'':) Take care. Marianita

I have used both pronounciations (sp?) for route 46. ("root" and "rout")
I usually use "root" though. :)

Newark I think should be closer to "Newerk" than "New ARK" (1 word vs. 2 words).

Newerk is probably from trying to say Newark too quickly. ;)

Jersey Warren
04-13-2006, 02:47 PM
Hi new friends,

Anyone who is really interested in this topic might like to view (and take, if it's still open) the dialect survey created by Bert Vaux, of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

I took it sometime ago. But if you do, be prepared to set aside a couple of hours. I think there are a few hundred questions.

Here's the link: http://www3.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/survey/Login.asp?SurveyID=101

P.S. At times, I hae been asked on message boards to give my example of a celebrity who talks with a "real" New Jersey accent. The best example I think of is Alan Alda, who to me, sounds very much like the people I grew up with.

Marianita
04-13-2006, 07:34 PM
Hi mithrander, I will pronounce Newark new werk from now on. lol. Keep me updated on how these things are done. Soon I will be Jersey bound. Take care. Marianita:)

Jersey Warren
04-21-2006, 04:10 PM
I was very surprised recently to learn that "big hair" somehow became associated with New Jersey! This is completly outside my scope of experience. The last time I remember "big hair" in New Jersey was around 1963 or 1964 or so when the "teased" look and lots of hair spray were popular. (As illustrated by Lady Bird Johnson [she was Texan but I'll explain that in a minute] and "girl bands" like the ones who did "Leader of the Pack." (Shangri-Las?)

Around 1963, when the Beach Boys and Jan and Dean became popular, the "surfer look" became popular, especially with those who went to the Shore a lot. My home was almost two hours from the prime surfing beaches, yet it seemed every girl bleached (and even ironed) her hair to get it straight and blonde. Even some guys who were into the surfer image bleached their hair. A friend of mine, Mike Winget (who now lives in Huntington Beach, Calif.) used to leave his board on his car all week long (he was a weekend surfer) so that when he cruised down Main Street in Ramsey after school, girls who all look and point and go "O-ooo! Look! A surfboard!"

Then with the Beatles came the Carnaby Street look (which also included vinyl micro minis, wide vinyl belts, and vinyl boots with textured stockings) started by London designer Mary Quant and popularized by Mick Jagger's girlfriend Maryanne Faithful, and that also involved long, straight hair. Ditto with the folksinger look popularized by singers such as Carly Simon, Joan Baez, Mary of Peter, Paul, and Mary, etc. That look was still popular when I left New Jersey in 1970.

But up until 1989, I was back for a visit at least twice a year. All of my brothers' wives were very preppy during the 80s and cerainly did not have "big hair." They still wore their hair fairly straight, shoulder length, with a little flip at the end.

I spent 1989-1992 in Los Angeles County and still no big hair. The first time I encountered it was in the Dallas area, especially among the Country & Western crowd. In fact, until I moved to Texas, I thought they had stopped making hairspray sometime in the late 60s! So, I went from 1964 to 1992 without every seeing "big hair," except in Texas. So how did New Jersey get stuck with that undeserved image?

Any clues, anyone? :confused:

Edited to note I forgot a couple of other styles I remember seeing on women in the 70s and 80s: the shag look, the Farah Fawcett look, and the short curly perm. But I never saw the "big poofy hair," either in Massachusetts or during my twice-a-year visits to New Jersey. However, I only visited between Bergen County and Ocean County. I rarely went in the heavily urban areas of N.J. during those years.

DebbieSans
04-21-2006, 04:56 PM
Hi Warren,

Big hair was definitely prevalent in Jersey in the early to mid 80s. It wasn't "beehive" big like in the 60s...it was more..."poofy". The style in my high school was long, poofy hair, teased up at the top (guilty look). A good, if somewhat exaggerated, example of this style can be seen in the movie Working Girl with Melanie Griffith.

Take care,
Debbie

Marianita
04-21-2006, 10:37 PM
Hi Jersey Pride, It looks like we have 2 topics here so I will touch on both. I know that there were puffy hairstyles in the late 50's and 60's. In the early 70's I had an afro. I wore the puffy hairdo's too and my pictures look old fashioned. It could be that New Jersey got a rep for big hair due to the styles some of the bands have. Actually I did not see anyone with big hair in New Jersey, nary a one.
As for the Jersey accent I am not sure if it comes from New York or what, maybe it does. I have one myself but as I said before it may be blended with my being Norwegian and speaking fluent Spanish and living here. My granddaughter in New Jersey is almost 6 and I talked to her on the phone the other night. My son is on his 3rd year there in Marlton. Well, my little granddaughter does have an accent now. She goes to school and picked it up. At any rate no one says,''I'm from Joisey,'' except maybe New Yorkers. I myself think it is pretty awesome to have kept some of my east coast accent. Marianita:)

MissingNJ
09-25-2006, 06:21 PM
I feel I have to weigh in at this point...

I agree with the sentiments above and it is kind of funny that the national perception of NJ is based on the very limited views available from the NJTP and Parkway.

But on the flip side, I kind of like the fact that this perception has limited the tourist traffic to some degree. I know that the shore towns and other areas really depend on that tourism but this state is getting pretty crazy when it comes to traffic.

Alot of my "leave it alone" sentiment also derives from the fact that when I g camping or site seeing or just walking the boardwalk i really don't want to have to listen to somebody with a "different" accent whining about NJ.

I like my state and I don't like people "passing thru" complaining about it.

As JerseyDevil said (but I will say it a little less tactfully): YOU DON'T LIKE IT THEN GET THE HECK OUT!!!

Yeah .. only the out of staters are the ones that really commute on the turnpike, the parkway or the AC expressway.. because if you're really from Jersey .. you know better than to travel that way. If you live in South Jersey .. you know that you can get to the shore by either Delsea Drive, Black Horse Pike or Route 9. You also know to take 42 towards Philly.

I miss Jersey so much!!!

Marianita
09-25-2006, 10:51 PM
Missing NJ, I really do, especially since my new grandson was born there on the 23rd in MtHolly. I wish I was there but have no vacation time left. I rather like traveling along the parkway but nice to know that there are easier ways to get where you want to go. New Jersey is the best place on earth and I intend to live there some day. Take care. Marianita

Nvme
09-28-2006, 04:56 PM
Hehe I live 5 minutes from Newark and we do in fact pronounce it " Nork " most times.

Now I know a lot of folks hate the spilting up the state but there are some differences - I grew up in Jersey City and when I moved to essex county I definitely had a "jersey accent" even though its 10 minutes away .
When I used to visit the grandparents in PA when I was a kid I was constantly asked to say words like " quarter , chocolate and coffee". I can always tell a Hudson county native by their accent-

And ever drive the Belleville turnpike on a hot summer day - smells like death :mad: - but its not the whole state people :)

But it could be worse we could be known for kissing cousins :rolleyes:

Marianita
09-28-2006, 07:10 PM
Hi Nvme, I too pronounce Newark ''Nork'' because my son in Marlton said that is how it is said. lol. I am not sure about the accent but everyone seemed to have one when I was there. lol. I myself am from the east coast originally, Maryland, and everyone knows I am not from here because of the way I talk. I found myself sort of copying the way things are said when I was in Jersey but not intentionally. I do notice my 6 yr old granddaughter has a definite accent now after 3 yrs there. Now as for the the turnpike I rather like it myself. I am a Jersian at heart. My granddaughter in Marlton took some pictures with my camera. Being only six she did rather well. She took a nice snapshot of ''Dunkin Donuts'', also a sign that said ''Medford'' and some open fields and wooded area and an excellent snapshot of my son's neighbors car. lol. These things alone made me miss New Jersey. I am thankful that my new grandson was born there. What a fortunate little person. Take care. Marianita:)

Jersey Warren
03-01-2007, 02:36 PM
Hi Jersey warren, I always pronounced Newark new ark but I guess the proper way is to say it is Newerk. I agree that accents do change with age and location. I was born and raised in Maryland, am Norwegian and live in California so think what that would do ones accent. lol. People still say they know I am not from here. As for the word ''route,'' I think it does depend on location. I always pronounce it ''root.'':) Take care. Marianita

Hi Marianita, :wave:

This is a real old thread, but I never commented about this before. You said your ancestry is Norwegian and you live in California. I lived in California for two and a half years years [1989-1992] and always wanted to visit Solvang, which is a little north of Santa Barbara. I visited Santa Barbara twice and each time, when I suggested visiting Solvang, I was outvoted by others who wanted to head for home.

Solvang was settled by Danish settlers (I know, not Norwegian,but Scandinavian) and they have a Danish style shopping village there. Maybe someday I'll get back there.

Marianita
03-02-2007, 01:47 AM
H Jersey Warren, How have you been? What part of California did you live in? I have not been to Solvang but would like to go. I found a Scandinavian shop in San Diego and have gone back there a couple of times. but I hear great things about Solvang. As for the Scandinvian shop I found it by accident. I was on a cruise ship and it stopped for the day in San Diego and that is when I found the shop.
There is absolutely nothing like that here. Infact there are people here who do not even know what a Norwegian is. LOL. especially one who speaks Spanish.:lmao: Anyway I hope you get to Solvang and I hope I do too. By the way the Solvang shop probably carries Norwegian and Swedish products as well as Danish. Take care, Marianita:wave:

Jersey Warren
03-02-2007, 09:31 AM
H Jersey Warren, How have you been? What part of California did you live in?

Hi Marianita,

I lived in Glendora, which is between "the 210" and "the 10" (in California speak) about 18 miles directly east of Pasadena. (I recently found out how Sig alerts got their name, when the man after whom they were named, whose last name began with Sig — Sigfried or something — passed away.)

From where we were, we could go down to Pomona and pick up the Newport Beach Freeway and be at Orange County beaches in an hour. We could also head east "San Berdoo" and visit apple farms in the mountains in an hour, or Palm Springs in two hours. I liked it there pretty much, except for the lack of good Italian food (unless you went near Hollywood and all its East Coast transplants) and the fact that I couldn't find work and we nearly went broke!

It's alway good to hear from you! :)

P.S. I twice had to correct my directions in this post and replace west with east. I always did that when out there and was told it was a common mistake for East Coast transplants. Easterners alway regard anything away from the ocean as "west," whereas in California it's the opposite. It's also strange when you get on I-10 ("the 10") in Santa Monica and see a sign that says, "East — Los Angeles." That's the ony place in the country where L.A. can be East!

Marianita
03-02-2007, 11:58 AM
Hi Jersey Warren, I have a brother in Glendora. I have been all those places, driven the 210 and San berdoo. I have family all over the LA area. I can tell you that Central California is by far better, a different world.
I have never lost my east coast roots. Everyone knows I am not from here as it is easy to tell.
As for the Italian food I really do not know of any good places here, the real thing. I love Italian food and enjoy cooking it. I fixed ziti at work the other day.
I am an east coast transplant also. lol. Have a wonderful day. :wave: marianita

Dreamer
02-22-2008, 01:10 AM
I'm really late to the party on this, but I just came accross this thread (and forum as a whole) and had to jump on the "Nork" train. My father works in Newark, and ever since I was little, I've called it "Nork". I had no idea that it was seriously called anything else until I graduated from college and started working. Once, however, I heard a news reporter on a Philadelphia station refer to it as "New Ark". That totally blew my mind, and I assumed that she was new to the area.

Regarding the various lists - I think they are very funny, however so many of the items tend to be region and lifestyle specific and can take away from the implied generality. I lived in Essex County when I was in elementary school, lived in Union County until sophmore year of high school, went to college in Gloucester County, and I currently live in Monmouth County. I only get "most" of the jokes because of the places I've lived. I think that it is funny that I'm still in the process of "getting" the references. For example, calling New York "The City" is completely new to me. I only became aware of it because I was recently working in Edison, and many of my coworkers refered to living or working in "The City".

Jersey Warren
02-22-2008, 09:18 AM
I'm really late to the party on this, but I just came accross this thread (and forum as a whole) and had to jump on the "Nork" train. My father works in Newark, and ever since I was little, I've called it "Nork". I had no idea that it was seriously called anything else until I graduated from college and started working. Once, however, I heard a news reporter on a Philadelphia station refer to it as "New Ark". That totally blew my mind, and I assumed that she was new to the area.

Regarding the various lists - I think they are very funny, however so many of the items tend to be region and lifestyle specific and can take away from the implied generality. I lived in Essex County when I was in elementary school, lived in Union County until sophmore year of high school, went to college in Gloucester County, and I currently live in Monmouth County. I only get "most" of the jokes because of the places I've lived. I think that it is funny that I'm still in the process of "getting" the references. For example, calling New York "The City" is completely new to me. I only became aware of it because I was recently working in Edison, and many of my coworkers refered to living or working in "The City".

Hi Dreamer, and welcome to the forum! :)

I've seen all the "You know you're from New Jersey" lists, too and I usually relate to over half of them. There are two factors that make it impossible for these lists to be universal for everyone: 1) They are region specific, and 2) they are age specific. I grew up in Bergen County but the rest of my family moved to Ocean County the year after I got married. So I am familiar with both places and aware of the differences. (In Ocean County it's a "sub"; in Bergen County it's a "hero.") To appreciate why Northeast New Jerseyans call New York "the City," they have posters at the train station in Ridgewood advertising plays at the theaters in Manhattan. In grammar school, we took class trips to the Bronx Zoo and the Museum of Natural History. My next-door neighbor had season box seats at Yankee Stadium and Ralph Houk, the manager of the Yankees lived in Saddle River. I once saw him in the Swiss Pork Store. As a boy, I could stand in an apple orchard in Upper Saddle River and see the Manhattan skline silouetted in hazy blue along the horizon — it was that close.

Both of my grandfathers said things differently than I did because they grew up in Jersey City and in a different era. (The very early 1900s). My grandfather called Newark New-ick (rhymes with Buick). They said radiator "RAD-iator" with a short a, not "RAID-iator." They referred to highways as "ROWT" 4 or "ROWT" 7, not "ROOT." (Interestingly, people in Wisconsin say that too, maybe it's a German thing.) My grandfather always ran the name of Jersey City together so it came out like "Jerzzcity."

Of course, some things ARE universal to New Jersey, particularly diners. The idea of popping into a diner for eggs and Taylor ham, or bacon, or sausage at 2 or 3 am on a Sunday morning after a big night out are a Jersey tradition.

One thing that always annoys me is when out of staters pronounce our state New Joisey! (G-r-r-r-r-r! :mad:) It always prompts this dialogue:

"Why do you call it Joisey?"
"Because that's how they say it there."
"No they don't."
"Yes, they do, I heard them."
"NO you didn't""
"YES I did!"
"If you heard someone call it 'Joisey' they must have been an eighth-grade dropout from Brooklyn, because NO ONE from New Jersey calls it 'Joisey.'!"
"What do they call it, then?"
"New JER-zee. It rhymes with Mersey, the river in Liverpool, England. Remember the Jerry and the Pacemakers song: 'Ferry 'Cross the Mersey'? Well from New York, you could take the ferry 'cross to Jersey!"
"Well, where are you from?"
"New Jersey."
"Then how come you don't talk funny?"
"What do you mean?"
"You don't say Joisey!"

G-r-r-r-r-r-r! :mad:

Marianita
02-22-2008, 09:53 AM
Hi Jersey Warren, How have you been? I learned from my son that Newark is pronounced ''Nork''. Dreamer said that that is how he knew it to be said all his life. Now as for the accents it is hard to say but there is a difference in the way people talk but ''Joisey?'' I never heard it there.:lmao:
The funny thing is that people from here have asked me if I was going back to ''Joisey.'' Now I don't think people there talk funny although people always asked me where I was from, not so much anymore. I do have some kind of an accent and used to get teased when using the intercom at work so now don't want to use it. :lmao: I am rather proud to be from the east coast. I meet all kinds of people who were born here and have never been anywhere. I mean nowhere out of California. Can you imagine such a thing?
Jersey Devil can tell you we sure had fun in ''Nork'' with Dave and my son and daughter-in-law. :) Marianita

JerseyDevil
02-22-2008, 05:29 PM
I've been too busy to post and I do have a lot to say - but realy quick about the pronunciation of Newark. I have never heard it pronounced Nork - rhyming with "York" My father grew up in Newark and pronounces it like I do - New-erk.

BTW - welcome Dreamer.

Jersey Warren
02-22-2008, 05:44 PM
I've been too busy to post and I do have a lot to say - but realy quick about the pronunciation of Newark. I have never heard it pronounced Nork - rhyming with "York" My father grew up in Newark and pronounces it like I do - New-erk.

BTW - welcome Dreamer.

Actually, in 22 years in New Jersey, all of that time within 25 miles of Newark, I never heard anyone call it Nork, either. Most people said it "New-erk," except for a few people like my grandfather (probably all from Jersey City) who said it so it rhymed with Buick! (New-ick)

Dreamer
02-22-2008, 11:33 PM
Hi all!

Marianita, I'm actually a she. :) But, thanks for supporting the "Nork" thing.

I think Nork comes from a lack of enunciation on the "New" in Newark. It probably causes others to hear it as Nork, and therefore repeat it. I suppose the Newick pronunciation would be the result of the reverse happening. But, I've never heard it.

Jersey Warren, I actually went to elementary school in East Orange. So, I'm familiar with a few of the things you mentioned (The Bronx Zoo, and the Museum of Natural History). But, most of all, the skyline. Until I was nine I lived in a 7th floor appartment that had a huge picture window; and I could sit on the RAD-iator :p and stare at the Twin Towers. We could even see the fireworks on the 4th of July. However, the item that you refer to as universal - eating at diners - is not something that has ever been a tradition for me. And, regarding the Joisey crap - I just want to smack the silly grin off the face of anyone that says it.

Dreamer
02-22-2008, 11:51 PM
On a different note, for those of you familiar with Eatontown, how do you (and/or people you know) pronounce it? Do you pronounce the first "t", or do you drop it the way people will drop the "t" in the name Martin? I drop it, and so do most people I know. Unfortunately, it becomes a problem when you're talking to people who have never heard of it. They have no idea what the heck you're trying to say. To them, it sounds like the place must be called Eatin'(Eating)town :D .

Also, once when my sister called into a radio show, she was "corrected" by one of the show's hosts. In my opinon, this was beyond rude. Thank goodness my sister didn't have to mention the county. I'd hate to think how she would have been treated after droping the "n" from Monmouth. (Which by the way also confuses people).

Jersey Warren
02-23-2008, 09:26 AM
On a different note, for those of you familiar with Eatontown, how do you (and/or people you know) pronounce it? Do you pronounce the first "t", or do you drop it the way people will drop the "t" in the name Martin? I drop it, and so do most people I know. Unfortunately, it becomes a problem when you're talking to people who have never heard of it. They have no idea what the heck you're trying to say. To them, it sounds like the place must be called Eatin'(Eating)town :D .

Also, once when my sister called into a radio show, she was "corrected" by one of the show's hosts. In my opinon, this was beyond rude. Thank goodness my sister didn't have to mention the county. I'd hate to think how she would have been treated after droping the "n" from Monmouth. (Which by the way also confuses people).

I've always pronounced it "Eatin' Town." (Or Eton Town, like the famous prep school in England!)

Most people I knew pronounced Monmouth County "Mommith," but when I reached my teen years and started getting more careful about my pronunciation, I started pronouncing like the place in England it was named after: MON-mith. (The mouth is never pronounced like the place you shovel your food into!)

I still stand by "SEA-caucus" (rather than "Se-CAU-cus") because "in the old days" that's how everyone n Hudson and Bergen County said it. I honestly think the "Se-CAU-cus" pronunciation came from transplants from elsewhere, as part of the gentrification process. Secaucus was known for its pig farms and I think the yuppies who went there in the 80s from Manhattan wanted to disassociate themselves from the place known for its pig farms so badly, they invented a new way to say it. :p

davegering
02-23-2008, 03:44 PM
I use to live in Eatin town as I pronounce it and my wife is from Sea caucus as we pronounce it

NJBarb
03-04-2008, 07:39 AM
It seems that North Jersey is influenced by NYC and South Jersey is influenced by Philly. So you have words like "beautiful" that are pronounced "byooduhfl" in North Jersey and "byoodeeful" in the South. And yeah, when I lived up there it was Nork, as opposed to "New-ark", which was the town in Delaware. "Joisey" always gets me, because wherever I lived, I never heard anyone from Jersey pronounce it like that - but people in Brooklyn and Queens do.
I don't like the TV show "House" but when I have watched it I'm always surprised that nobody sounds like they are from NJ - just this homogenized TV accent.

Jersey Warren
03-04-2008, 09:14 AM
It seems that North Jersey is influenced by NYC and South Jersey is influenced by Philly. So you have words like "beautiful" that are pronounced "byooduhfl" in North Jersey and "byoodeeful" in the South. And yeah, when I lived up there it was Nork, as opposed to "New-ark", which was the town in Delaware. "Joisey" always gets me, because wherever I lived, I never heard anyone from Jersey pronounce it like that - but people in Brooklyn and Queens do.
I don't like the TV show "House" but when I have watched it I'm always surprised that nobody sounds like they are from NJ - just this homogenized TV accent.

I always hold up Alan Alda as an example of someone who speaks with the same kind of New Jersey accent I grew up with. Though he was born in the Bronx, Alda went to high school in White Plains, in Westchester County, which is suburban and middle class, like Bergen County, where I grew up. Alda has been a resident of Leonia, in Bergen county, for many years. While he was filing M*A*S*H, he commuted between L.A. and New Jersey, because he didn't want to move his family to L.A. Another actor with a fairly typical Southern New Jersey accent is Bruce Willis. Bruce Springsteen has a typical working class Jersey Shore accent, and Frank Sinatra had a middle class Hudson county accent when he spoke, but was almost Boston-esque when he sang.

JerseyDevil
03-04-2008, 04:08 PM
I don't like the TV show "House" but when I have watched it I'm always surprised that nobody sounds like they are from NJ - just this homogenized TV accent.
Actually - the way the speak on House, is the way most people in central new Jersey speak. I lived in south Brunswick and went to school in Princeton at St Paul's on Nassau Street. When I moved back to New Jersey - I moved to Plainsboro which is on the other side of Rt 1 from Princeton. Anyway - I'm very familiar with the area and the way people speak there. Most people along the shore also don't have a NY or Philly influenced accent - although of course you do always run into the transplants.

NJ is actually a very complicated state - even when it comes to the "accent" because there are so many different varieties. The accent is also influenced by ethnicity. What many people think of the New Jersey accent is not only a more New York accent - but it's also heavily influenced by the Italian immigrants who came over through Ellis Island. Southern New Jersey accent is actually heavily influenced by the Swedes and other Scandinavians who settled southern New Jersey in the early colonial days.

I think I said this before - when I traveled around the country - whenever I said I was from New Jersey - they always looked at me funny and told me that I couldn't be from there because I don't have an accent. But I grew up in Bricktown and Kendall Park - both that have a more proper dictionary accent.

Momz
07-01-2008, 05:21 PM
Interesting. From my childhood, I still remember Taylor Ham as being Taylor Ham, not "pork roll", and my parents were born in NJ. (Both born and reared within 5 miles of Newark.) They were both lower working class types who were teens during the depression - perhaps the era has something to do with it, just like how armadillos and roadkill were "Hoover Hogs" in other parts of the country, pork roll was "Taylor Ham" in theirs?

There's definitely a kind of accent that I hear from some tourists from NJ who come here to California, and when I ask them where in NJ they are from, it's usually North Jersey (and not New York). It's identifiable, but it's not "Joisey", not by any stretch of the imagination. :)

I'm still stuck with a bit of a NJ accent (now mixed up with several others, long story!) but only for a few words unless I think of them before I say them. "Dog" comes out something like "dhawwwg" and "Newark" comes out something like "Nork". I had a friend googling "Nork" one time when I told her there was a major airport there, and she was a bit perplexed until I spelled it for her. When I was a young kid we moved away from there, down to a southern state. They put me in speech therapy class when I got there because I spoke so rapidly nobody could understand me!

We lived up near Montville when I was a kid. I remember playing in the woods, and lots of dairy and farm land. And seeing soapsuds on the Passaic River and trash everywhere on the ground in the more urban areas when we went into Newark or anywhere. We went back for a really fast visit about 20 years ago and I was kind of shocked that there was still so much litter blowing around in the streets (of course, winter was probably not the best time to see NJ, as everything was pretty barren). I hope that was just a fluke.

Momz
07-01-2008, 05:41 PM
On Seacaucus - I remember hearing it in the early 1960s as sea-CAU-cus pig flats, all one phrase, never just sea-CAU-cus. ;)

Jersey Warren
07-02-2008, 02:17 PM
On Seacaucus - I remember hearing it in the early 1960s as sea-CAU-cus pig flats, all one phrase, never just sea-CAU-cus. ;)

Hi Momz,

Growing up, my parents always referred to it as "Taylor Ham," and most diners still call it that on their menus. But the Taylor company has officially called it Taylor Pork Roll for many, many years.

I think I first heard the pronunciation sea-CAU-cus on a Siskel and Ebert movie review and I remember thinking: "What do they know about New Jersey, they're from Chicago!"

I remember driving past Secaucus with my grandparents around 1953 or 52 and smelling the pig farms! My grandparents and many other relatives lived in nearby Jersey City and Union City for years (they were married in Union City in 1923) and everyone around there called it SEA - caucus, with the accent on the first syllable. (Actually, with a real New Jersey accent, it's more like "SEA-cawk-iss")

I really think it was when the New York clothing merchants started building factory outlet stores there that they decided they wanted a more gentrified pronunciation.

I also don't know where this "Nork" for Newark comes from because everyone in the Jersey City-Newark area back then said it to rhyme with Buick : NEW-ick, hitting the "New" very hard.

Notice that New Jerseyans who go to college out of state come home with a different accent. Just living in Massachusetts for 17 years softened mine quite a bit, and I went from saying CAW-fee to COFF-ee! :lmao:

Momz
07-03-2008, 11:14 AM
Notice that New Jerseyans who go to college out of state come home with a different accent. Just living in Massachusetts for 17 years softened mine quite a bit, and I went from saying CAW-fee to COFF-ee! :lmao:

EXACTLY. That's it - the "awww" thing! It's in the words one doesn't expect to have an "awww". ;) Only it's a kind of more nasal "awwwk" than a crow-like "awwwwk".

Yes, I remember the smell of the pig flats, as well. We were going to the airport (???) when I was very young, and had to for some reason drive through them. It was summer, and long before cars had air conditioners in them. PWHWEW!:eek:

Another thing, I knew a guy from No Jersey a few years ago, and I don't think it's typical of NJ, but he kept putting "r" in places it didn't belong. Called Washington "Warsh-ngg-ton". Did something odd with "ing" as well, it became more of a "nggg" sound. Stuff like that. But he was a little peculiar. I assumed he just had really bad sinuses. Now, I know the folks from Bahston misplaced their "Rs" many years ago, but thought they'd ended up in NYC somewhere? What's with the "warshing" clothes, etc.? Is that a Joisey thing? :-D

JerseyDevil
07-03-2008, 11:47 AM
EXACTLY. That's it - the "awww" thing! It's in the words one doesn't expect to have an "awww". ;) Only it's a kind of more nasal "awwwk" than a crow-like "awwwwk".

That seems to be a Long Island accent.


Another thing, I knew a guy from No Jersey a few years ago, and I don't think it's typical of NJ, but he kept putting "r" in places it didn't belong. Called Washington "Warsh-ngg-ton". Did something odd with "ing" as well, it became more of a "nggg" sound. Stuff like that. But he was a little peculiar. I assumed he just had really bad sinuses. Now, I know the folks from Bahston misplaced their "Rs" many years ago, but thought they'd ended up in NYC somewhere? What's with the "warshing" clothes, etc.? Is that a Joisey thing? :-D
I lived in Indiana for a while and this seems to be a Indiana/Kentucky thing - particularly southern Indiana and northern Kentucky. They say warsh instead of wash and wrestling is pronounced "wrassling".

Welcome on board by the way. :) I had started writing a welcome message before, but got busy doing something else int he middle of it.

Marianita
07-05-2008, 11:51 PM
Hi Momz. When I was in New Jersey I noticed the accent. I am not from New Jersey but from Maryland but the accent is much the same. I think too as others have said that being so close to New York has something to do with it. At any rate people here in Calif still say they know I am not from here. I get teased when using the intercom at work.
My love of New Jersey has earned me the name of ''Jersey lady'' which I simply love. I don't think anyone says''joisey'' either. I think someone just made that up. As for ''warshing clothes'' I have heard that before on the east coast. I have heard Newark being called ''Nork'' or Newerk but said real fast.:lmao:
On a searious note I simply left my heart in New Jersey and miss the place so much. I spent 4 vacations there with my son and daughter-in-law and he moved to Texas. Their little boy was born in Mt.Holly so is a genuine Jersey baby. Little Savannah still has an accent.
My son and daughter-in-law and baby Christian met Jersey Devil at the Jersey store at the Newark airport and Jersey Devil held the baby who is almost 2 yrs old. Dave Gering has a wonderful store there in the airport. That was a memorable time having lunch together. Take care. Marian:)ita

stalepie
09-09-2008, 09:20 PM
Here I posted a thread:

http://forums.project2612.org/showthread.php?t=317

asking why don't black people ever have New Jersey accents. I also kind of duplicated it over here: http://www.intothelabyrinth.net/forums/viewtopic.php?p=12052#12052
but that one will probably get deleted.

stalepie
09-09-2008, 09:53 PM
I don't think New Jersey accents exist anymore. I think everyone just kind of talks the same.

Marianita
09-10-2008, 05:16 AM
Hi stalepie. I don't tknow the answer to that one for sure. But not everyone speaks the same. The accent is more pronounced in some then in others. That is a good question though. Marianita

Jersey Warren
09-10-2008, 09:30 AM
Hi folks,

I couldn't resist jumping in. I can even spot a New Jersey accent here in Florida. I've met several people who are transplants and had them pegged right away.

Of all celebrities people might be familiar with, the one that I think has a most representative New Jersey accent is Alan Alda. (Hawkeye on M*A*S*H).

However, the accent varies according to the part of New Jersey and the level of education of the speaker. People in the northern half of Bergen County (where the median home price is around $1 million) are often educated at New England colleges and sound like they're from Connecticut. Former Governor Kean sounded like that.

The belt around Newark and Jersey City sounds a lot like New York City.

Further South, the accent is more like Pennsylvania.

One odd thing I've noticed traveling around the country: Transplants to Los Angeles and Florida tend to keep the accent of where they were from. But people in Dallas tend to lose their original accent and start saying "I'm fixin' to go with y'all!" Except for me. I REFUSED to be "Texified"!

Wherever I roam, I'm always a New Jerseyan! :)

stalepie
09-10-2008, 09:39 AM
But isn't George Bush from Connecticut?

True. Notice that George H.W. Bush (the father) pretty much kept his Northeastern way of speaking. (He was originally from Massachusetts.) He spent most of his adult Texas years in Midland, where the pressure to conform wasn't as great as the big cities. He also spent much time back at the family home in Kennebunkport, Maine, and moving in circles where he was in constant contact with people from all over the world. The son, George W. (the president) was born in New Haven, but spent more of his childhood in Texas, married a Texas woman, and succumbed to the pressure to become Texan. This would have been important in state politics (he ran for governor, while his father started his career as an Ambassador and went directly to Washington as Vice President). So we have George the elder still sounding like a "Yalie" while his son gave up his Yale heritage and sounds very much like a Texan.

stalepie
09-10-2008, 10:02 AM
Well if he was raised there then I guess he is a Texan.

Jersey Warren
09-10-2008, 01:17 PM
Well if he was raised there then I guess he is a Texan.

You would think so. :D

However, the old-time Texans say you can't become a Texan, you have to be BORN a Texan!

It didn't matter to me at the time, since I was not interested in becoming a Texan any more than I was interested in becoming identified with any other state I've lived in. I've always considered myself a New Jerseyan-in-exile wherever I've lived.

Marianita
09-10-2008, 08:48 PM
Hi Jersey Warren. I agree that it is not hard to notice a New Jersey accent. My son had one when he left for Texas and my 8 yr old grandaughter did too. I have an accent but do not notice it myself, others do as I am from Maryland. I wonder if Jersey Devil noticed it. Anyway whoever comes to live in Nj will probably acquire an accent over time especially if they are children when they arrive. I am not sure about people from Texas.
Anyway I consider myself to be a Jersey girl. I just was not born there. lol. Take care. MaryAnne

Jersey Warren
09-11-2008, 02:22 PM
Hi Jersey Warren. I agree that it is not hard to notice a New Jersey accent. My son had one when he left for Texas and my 8 yr old grandaughter did too. I have an accent but do not notice it myself, others do as I am from Maryland. I wonder if Jersey Devil noticed it. Anyway whoever comes to live in Nj will probably acquire an accent over time especially if they are children when they arrive. I am not sure about people from Texas.
Anyway I consider myself to be a Jersey girl. I just was not born there. lol. Take care. MaryAnne

Hi Marianita! (I never knew your name was really Mary Anne!) It was funny that during my years in Massachusetts people would often say: "You don't sound like you're from here originally. Where are you from — Connecticut?" When I said New Jersey they wanted to know why I didn't "talk funny"! They were used to the stereotypical "Vinnie Barbarino" accent. I grew up within walking distance of Rockland County, New York, and that area is already in the Upstate New York/Westchester County/Fairfield County, Conn. speech pattern area.

My daughter, on the other hand, was born and raised in Massachusetts, but with a father who was a New Jersey native and a mother who was a Maine native of New Hampshire parents who also grew up in New Jersey. So my daughter sounds like she went to broadcasting school and has no discernible accent whatsoever. She went to grammar school in Massachusetts, middle school in Los Angeles County, high school in California and Texas, and never changed. (She must take after me!) I always think if you know who you are, you don't need to "fit in" — let others accept you for who you are.

If you ever get a chance to see California Dreamin' with Robbie Benson, it's very funny. It's about a guy from Jersey City who fulfills a lifelong dream of moving to Los Angeles and when he gets there it reminds him of New Jersey! :)

jersey_girl93
11-15-2008, 08:10 PM
I live in South Jersey and I know that I say waa-ter not wu-tur.
I also know that when I went to Savanna Georgia, everyone there was like, "These folks her are from New Joisey!" So I thought thats where that started.
We have a lot of farmlands and corn fields and apple orchards.
We also have some of the cheapest gas in the U.S. Thats right, today gas is $1.89 on average. And we dont pump our own gas. So deal with it.
If I stand at a gas station, I can see at least 2 more if I look to my left and right. SOem are right across the street from each other. The same with Wawa, which is a STORE! And also the same with McDonalds.

We go down the shore in the summer to Cape May and Atlantic City to go to the boardwalk where we walk around and eat Philly Cheese steaks and HOAGIES! not subs.

The stereotypical hell hole that we have is Camden.

We are also the hoem state of the Jonas Brothers! so take that Hollywood!

Also, when we talk about interstates, we dont say 'Interstate 95' or '95'. We say 'i95' (eye-ninety-five)



I dont know, just thoguht I'd share some facts on South Jersey for people who dont know.







---------------------------------
New Jersey, where the weak are killed and eaten.

JerseyDevil
11-16-2008, 01:33 AM
Welcome Jersey_girl93 - Thanks for posting. I hope you will share some of the great things about southern New Jersey. It is beautiful down there and is home to the second oldest tavern in the US. People seem to define New Jersey by the northern section and sadly forget about the great southern half. There is definitely a difference in the phrases between northern New Jersey and southern New Jersey.

There is only one WaWa that I know of that is north of 195 by the way - and that is in Princeton by the Train Station across from McCarter Theater.

One thing that surprises people - including many New Jerseyans is that we have mountains - and that the Appalachian Trail goes through New Jersey.

Always Amy
12-09-2008, 06:40 PM
I live in Central Jersey, so its kinda hard to fit into either side of the pronunciation fights...but again, what do I know, I use "y'all" every so often, use "bloody" as an adjective like a British person, and have a fondness for the word "git". But from reading the previous conversation and how alot of ya are out of state, a younger opinion might be nice...I'm still in high school.

When I was little, I used to see the signs for Newark while driving on 22, and thought it was a contractional form of New York. So that might be why I pronounce Newark as Nork. The first time I went to Delaware and saw signs the said "Newark" and someone told me that they pronounce it "New-ark", I was insanely confused.

Other common words...
Whadjya - What did you
Puh-SAY-ick and Suh-cau-cus
Root - Route


I listen to both z100 and PST and hate it when I travel and can only get one station.

206 cuts through my town. All within town, we have a 7-11, Wawa, and Quickcheck.

A sandwich on a long roll is a sub. Not a submarine, and definitely not a grinder, hoagie or hero.

I personally support NY sports teams, though my town is somewhat split. More go NY, though. The only sport I really care about is hockey, though. I admit, I must say LET'S GO RANGERS!

I just turned in a project this morning for Driver's Ed on Circles and Jug handles. And I laughed while doing my "research" so many people complain that they're confusing...I didn't think places existed where there weren't any.

I hate when I leave the state and can't get a good bagel. A bagel is more than round bread...it has to have that nice chewy outside while keeping its soft inside. My dad and brother like to have Taylor Ham on the weekends.

But speaking of leaving the state, the idea of not having someone pump gas for you creeps me out.

It takes about 2 minutes in any direction to get to the nearest farm. And 2 minutes from any of those to reach the next .

People in Jersey don't know we have mountains? Every kid in town has been up in the Sourlands at least once...

I'm excited...my family is going to The City to see Spamalot.

There's alot more worth saying, but this is probably getting too lengthy...so, yea.

Jerseyboy1963
12-20-2008, 10:00 PM
Hi,

I just thought I'd put in my two cents to this thread. I work as a customer service rep answering the phone, and speak to people from all over the country. Many people tell me that I have a "northern quality" to my voice or that they think I'm from New York, because I speak fairly quickly. I tell them that I work in Philadelphia and live in New Jersey. (I'm only 20 minutes across the Delaware River from Philly.) One woman told me that I don't sound like I'm from Jersey, that I don't have an accent. A man once asked me if I had "that accent". "You mean 'Joisey'?" I then told him that no, I didn't think so, and that I thought it was a New York thing.

Most people tell me that I have an accent, although I don't notice it, probably because most of the people I'm around talk like I do. If anything, it's more influenced by Philly than anywhere else. For example, I will call a "sub" a "hoagie" (although technically, Philadelphians say that a "hoagie" is a "sub" with lettuce and tomato). When I was growing up on Merrick Avenue in Westmont, a part of Haddon Township named after a horse named "Westmount", my best friend and I often said "wooder" instead of water, or "crick" instead of creek (although it's a lake, we still call it "Newton Crick"). Mike still uses "crick" to mean "creek", and it drives his Haddonfield-born wife, Karen, crazy.

Jim